Do you ever feel like not doing what is expected of you? Watch

blacksheep8
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#41
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#41
(Original post by gjd800)
Those sort of instances are examples of ******** moves, for sure. But there's a difference between doing that and saying 'look, this part of your argument is really weak because x y z'. If we were to take the dog analogy seriously, we'd ignore the weakness and pat them on the head for managing to do something else reasonably well. That's the other end of the extreme. Instead, a middle ground where you robustly deal with a piece, but fairly. I don't think that this should be too controversial.
You are legit so sly? That laser focus on the apparent 'dog analogy', I said children too. Unbelievable.
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Lady Jamie
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(Original post by gjd800)
Those sort of instances are examples of ******** moves, for sure. But there's a difference between doing that and saying 'look, this part of your argument is really weak because x y z'. If we were to take the dog analogy seriously, we'd ignore the weakness and pat them on the head for managing to do something else reasonably well. That's the other end of the extreme. Instead, a middle ground where you robustly deal with a piece, but fairly. I don't think that this should be too controversial.
Agree, there is a reason why my Property lecturer is my fav, her criticisms are so on point and constructive. Felt more motivated to study after discussing them rather than feeling deflated.

My crim taker treats us like dogs hahaha, maybe that's why I'm so behind...that blind optimism and an illusion of safety :rolleyes:

Btw, out of curiosity - do you ‘cold-call’ in ur seminars? What is the rationale behind it? Can you not? :lol:
(Original post by blacksheep8)
Oh gosh, that's horrible. Honestly, I'm a really empathetic person so it actually hurt just reading what you wrote happened to that poor guy. That's beyond terrible, and just wrong on so many levels.

See, to me I think effort needs to be made on both sides. Lecturers/ teachers need to strive to be more gentle with criticism, and focus on being constructive and praising what goes well (this is a genuine concern of mine because I have often got essays back where I have failed to get the praise they meant to 'imply' by not criticising chunks of work, and I've just been like... okay, was that good or bad? Do I need to change that??- tell me for future reference!! It's a genuine issue. Like they're oh so shy of praising students -_-) and students should respond to this positive feedback positively - and in most cases they sure as hell would. I've had lecturers give me constructive feedback, nothing too special, but a sign that they know where I'm going with this etc, and I've been like YES I can do this! I'm going to do better next time.
Yeah, I think he was having a bad day tho. He's an excellent seminar leader but is just an intimidating and temperamental individual.

Oh yeah, praises are definitely vital. It's encouraging and provides a basis for students to build their work upon. Definitely and speak to ur teachers individually if you are unsure, it's good to have a clear idea about exactly what you are doing right AND wrong.
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sknudson
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#43
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(Original post by blacksheep8)
sknudson, Max1989, AspiringAccount, Lady Jamie At school I wasn't someone who was praised or noticed much so I think I rebelled in this way. It just sort of felt futile? Like I just wasn't one of the chosen kids that all the teachers doted on and I would never be, so what was the point?

Do you guys relate at all?

Or was it more like pressure from parents?
I wouldn't say I rebelled. I just wasn't particularly compliant. There were lessons I cared about and excelled in, like RE and philosophy. Other things I just completely blanked and did just barely enough to pass or end up with Ds. I wasn't noticed much either. I think I just blended in with the other failures around me. It's easy to get lost in the crowd though when you started your GCSEs after moving here at the end of Year 10 and only having a year to finish two year's worth of studying, coursework, and whatnot. Parents evening was nothing more than "I'd be happy if he got a C". Me too.

Note: 2 Bs, 4 Cs, 4 Ds, 1 Es at GCSE. 1 D and 4 Es at AS Level. Left school then.
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blacksheep8
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#44
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(Original post by sknudson)
I wouldn't say I rebelled. I just wasn't particularly compliant. There were lessons I cared about and excelled in, like RE and philosophy. Other things I just completely blanked and did just barely enough to pass or end up with Ds. I wasn't noticed much either. I think I just blended in with the other failures around me. It's easy to get lost in the crowd though when you started your GCSEs after moving here at the end of Year 10 and only having a year to finish two year's worth of studying, coursework, and whatnot. Parents evening was nothing more than "I'd be happy if he got a C". Me too.

Note: 2 Bs, 4 Cs, 4 Ds, 1 Es at GCSE. 1 D and 4 Es at AS Level. Left school then.
Sounds like you had a negative experience with education. You should know that it doesn't reflect your intelligence and value as a person. Throughout school I always got mediocre grades too, then sometimes better grades, sometimes worse, but often I was middle of the road/ average. I assumed I just wasn't that good at school/ I wasn't that smart. But as I started learning about self-love etc, I started recognising my strengths. It was all because my self-esteem was growing, not because I was taught better or more, or my intelligence was somehow now growing out of nowhere. I still got some crappy grades at the more memorise-y subjects at a-level (even though I actually found them interesting for the first time ever, probably similarly as a result of a boost in self-esteem, and maybe also because there were less subjects and in more detail) but I was starting to really see my strengths in English for example because I started to see that I had good ideas and that finding links was easy for me. The point is, this had always been the case, but when I was younger I was just a kid, I was reliant on someone telling me that I was good but no one ever did so I grew up feeling like I was no good at school, which was just a lie. I think environment plays the biggest part in differentiating students from one another (levels of self-esteem, how much someone has been introduced to a subject in their home environment etc, how good they are at talking and writing will depend on their parents' language skills etc) but it can simply bd learned, so don't be fooled that just because you got crappy grades sometimes that you're not an intelligent, able mind.
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gjd800
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#45
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(Original post by blacksheep8)
You are legit so sly? That laser focus on the apparent 'dog analogy', I said children too. Unbelievable.
The point is the same. Leading a dog or a toddler away from negative behaviour is not the same as leading a student away from bad technique. I don't think you know what 'sly' means.
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gjd800
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(Original post by Lady Jamie)
Btw, out of curiosity - do you ‘cold-call’ in ur seminars? What is the rationale behind it? Can you not? :lol:
Not sure what this means. Do you mean directly questioning quieter students? Sometimes but not often. Better to try and win some confidence, but every now and again you get someone that won't offer anything to the room but sits whispering wisecracks to their mates. If they can share with their mate, they can share with the rest of us, pretty much.
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