Appropriate answer ? (different approach to the textbook one) Watch

SkillBill
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=uP7RBWsoQ44

I am an older guy with a physics background doing the A-levels for college entry. Would it qualify as a full mark solution in the exam answering this problem using Energy Conservation Theorem ?
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Pangol
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(Original post by SkillBill)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=uP7RBWsoQ44

I am an older guy with a physics background doing the A-levels for college entry. Would it qualify as a full mark solution in the exam answering this problem using Energy Conservation Theorem ?
That's an interesting question - but hard to answer. Energy does not feature at all in the mechanics component of the regular Maths A Level, so an energy solution is certainly not expected. I'm not at all sure if alternative approaches would be permitted. Anyone with more exam board or exam marking experience?
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begbie68
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Firstly, the understanding when marking most maths exams is that a correct final answer would usually qualify for full marks to be awarded.

I apologise for vague wording, 'most' and 'usually' because there are standard types of questions eg involving 'show that' where marks awarded are for showing a correct method & fully correct working.

There are other types of questions where candidates are instructed to use a specific method / process. In these cases, responses which do not follow this instruction will achieve zero marks.

There are a limited number of cases, also, where candidates achieve a correct final answer but they have made two mistakes, or used a method incorrectly, and just been lucky to arrive at a result matching the expected correct answer. These types of responses get few or no marks.

So, answering this particular question, using ANY valid method, formal or informal, which correctly leads to the final answer will be awarded full marks.
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begbie68
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2 more quick points:

1. In most questions involving "solve", many candidates find a solution to a given equation by "trial and improvement", except their trial and improvement steps are more like "hit or miss". These responses rarely/never score full marks, and most often achieve no marks.

2. In the video you've shown, taking 15 mins to achieve the required answer is about 14 minutes too long.
Create & solve a simultaneous, and use v^2 = u^2 + 2as twice is probably as efficient, or more efficient, compared to using conservation of energy.
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Notnek
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Adding to the above, I think it's good idea to stick to on-spec methods as much as possible. This is because exam questions have been designed to be solved using methods in the spec so those will often be the fastest ways to answer the question. You should only use an off-spec method if you are sure that it's correct and if you have a good reason to use it e.g. if your method will clearly be faster than anything else.

Also, there's always the small possibility that the examiner won't follow correct procedure and award you marks that you deserve for using a method not in the spec. This is probably very unlikely but I don't see any harm in being cautious and sticking to methods in the spec.

SkillBill if you are asking about using energy for this question because you are not confident with the methods in the video then I strongly recommend focusing on improving your understanding of these methods. Using energy may not be an option in other similar tough questions.
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SkillBill
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Τhank you all for your replies! High school exams are of a bit different style/methods than the ones I m more used to. I will stick to following textbook material from now on.
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