Leah.J
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#1
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I don't understand the role of stretch receptors and what they really do.
In some areas, I read that it stretches when we do exercise, in others I read that it is stimulated when a surrounding muscle stretches ... I know that it should send an impulse to the Cardiovascular centre when its stimulated but I don't get how its stimulated .
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Jpw1097
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#2
Report 2 years ago
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(Original post by Leah.J)
I don't understand the role of stretch receptors and what they really do.
In some areas, I read that it stretches when we do exercise, in others I read that it is stimulated when a surrounding muscle stretches ... I know that it should send an impulse to the Cardiovascular centre when its stimulated but I don't get how its stimulated .
Since you're asking about the effect of stretch receptors on heart rate, I'm assuming you're referring to the stretch receptors found in the arch of the aorta and the carotid sinus. There are other stretch receptors in muscles, tendons, lungs, etc.
The stretch receptors (or baroreceptors) found in the aortic arch and carotid sinus are responsible for maintaining blood pressure. If there is a fall in blood pressure for some reason (e.g. haemorrhage), these barorceptors send signals to the cardiovascular centre in the medulla. This in turn increases the sympathetic output to the heart and blood vessels and decreases the parasympathetic output to the heart. This causes the heart rate and contractility (strength of heart contraction) to increases (increasing stroke volume and hence cardiac output). The increased sympathetic drive to blood vessels causes vasocontriction (as well as venoconstriction) which increases the total peripheral resistance.
Mean arterial pressure = cardiac output (which is stroke volume x heart rate) x total peripheral resistance. Therefore, by increasing total peripheral resistance (by vasoconstriction) and increasing cardiac output (by increasing stroke volume and heart rate), you will increase the blood pressure.
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