How many languages can you think in? Watch

hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
How many languages can you think in?
0
reply
Glaz
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 months ago
#2
Does British English and American English count as two separate languages?
3
reply
username4355882
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 10 months ago
#3
(Original post by HowToBeABlobfish)
Does British English and American English count as two separate languages?
When they must, they do! In this case, yes :yes:
2
reply
Mruczega
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 months ago
#4
British, English, American, Polish and Idiot.
2
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 months ago
#5
One. And barely that sometoimes :rolleyes:
There are a couple of things that I can automatically come up with in other languages without taking deliberate steps to translate, but just like saying thanks or excuse me or "I don't speak french" in french. Not exactly thinking in another language.
Although saying "I speak french" in french does help to one up smug kids when they start boasting their language skills to the ski instructor in english. I can't follow it up to save my life, but for one glorious moment I outdid them and that was sweet.
0
reply
username4355882
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 10 months ago
#6
(Original post by Kindred)
One. And barely that sometoimes :rolleyes:
There are a couple of things that I can automatically come up with in other languages without taking deliberate steps to translate, but just like saying thanks or excuse me or "I don't speak french" in french. Not exactly thinking in another language.
Although saying "I speak french" in french does help to one up smug kids when they start boasting their language skills to the ski instructor in english. I can't follow it up to save my life, but for one glorious moment I outdid them and that was sweet.
That is petty and awesome. I LOVE IT :proud:
1
reply
Elle666
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report 10 months ago
#7
3 eng span & frnch somtimes a mix of it all + other languages
0
reply
Aivicore
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 10 months ago
#8
Just 1 for me, sadly, although the odd word or phrase is more thoroughly cemented in another language. So I'll catch myself thinking some frankenstein's monster of a sentence and have to fix it to be complete English.
1
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 10 months ago
#9
English and Cantonese, my mandarin is quite poor so I have to translate it back to English in my head.
0
reply
yzanne
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 10 months ago
#10
I can't fluently think in french but I sometimes mix up french and english words and translate them without thinking.
1
reply
esrever
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 months ago
#11
3. English, Hindi and Marathi.
0
reply
hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#12
bump
0
reply
hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#13
(Original post by esrever)
3. English, Hindi and Marathi.
What is your default thinking language? What age did you learn them?
0
reply
eMdnE
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#14
Report 10 months ago
#14
One. I'm sure you can guess which.
0
reply
esrever
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 10 months ago
#15
(Original post by hj232)
What is your default thinking language? What age did you learn them?
Learnt English at age 3 (even though got fluent many years later). Marathi is my mother tongue. Learnt Hindi at age 7.

My default language for think was Marathi until around age 13 when I started making conscious efforts to think in English (in order to improve).
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 10 months ago
#16
3.

English, Japanese and Bengali.

I grew up as a multilingual fluent in English and Bengali as well as understanding completely but not being able to speak/write/read Hindi and Urdu.

I grew up watching Japanese animation even though I didn't understand the language and relied solely on the subtitles. In primary school I studied French; in high school I studied French and Spanish; and, at university I studied Japanese, French and Spanish. My level of English greatly decreased at university even though it was my best subject at high school and I was always considered to be well-spoken.

I spent a year studying in Tokyo during my undergraduate degree. During this time, my thinking voice shifted to Japanese and my general level of English and Bengali decreased so much so that I struggled communicating with family and friends back home.

As soon as I graduated university, I went to Japan for work where I stayed for a year. I had many foreign colleagues and spoke quite a bit of English at this time, so my level of English didn't decline like it had done during my previous stay in Japan.

These days I'm situated in the UK and as a result I mostly think in English. In Japan, my thinking voice changes to Japanese. I used to think in Bengali when I was a child until the age of around 14 or 15.

Since my year studying in Japan during my undergraduate degree, my dreams have shifted to being in Japanese which they are even now.
Last edited by Quick-use; 10 months ago
0
reply
hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#17
(Original post by esrever)
Learnt English at age 3 (even though got fluent many years later). Marathi is my mother tongue. Learnt Hindi at age 7.

My default language for think was Marathi until around age 13 when I started making conscious efforts to think in English (in order to improve).
what is the default now?
0
reply
hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#18
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
English and Cantonese, my mandarin is quite poor so I have to translate it back to English in my head.
What is default thinking language?
0
reply
Lala143
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#19
Report 10 months ago
#19
I know it's not that impressive but I can think in 12 different languages
British English, American English, Malaysian English, Australian English, Canadian English, New Zealand English, South African English, Indian English, Brazillian English, Chinese English, Japanese English and a bit of French.
0
reply
hj232
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#20
can you think in bengali now?
(Original post by Quick-use)
3.

English, Japanese and Bengali.

I grew up as a multilingual fluent in English and Bengali as well as understanding completely but not being able to speak/write/read Hindi and Urdu.

I grew up watching Japanese animation even though I didn't understand the language and relied solely on the subtitles. In primary school I studied French; in high school I studied French and Spanish; and, at university I studied Japanese, French and Spanish. My level of English greatly decreased at university even though it was my best subject at high school and I was always considered to be well-spoken.

I spent a year studying in Tokyo during my undergraduate degree. During this time, my thinking voice shifted to Japanese and my general level of English and Bengali decreased so much so that I struggled communicating with family and friends back home.

As soon as I graduated university, I went to Japan for work where I stayed for a year. I had many foreign colleagues and spoke quite a bit of English at this time, so my level of English didn't decline like it had done during my previous stay in Japan.

These days I'm situated in the UK and as a result I mostly think in English. In Japan, my thinking voice changes to Japanese. I used to think in Bengali when I was a child until the age of around 14 or 15.

Since my year studying in Japan during my undergraduate degree, my dreams have shifted to being in Japanese which they are even now.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Has your university offer been reduced?

Yes (42)
32.06%
No (68)
51.91%
Don't know (21)
16.03%

Watched Threads

View All