whichuni050100
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I know I want to work with children, but what's an Education course like?

Is it worth spending all the money when there are other ways to get into teaching?

Is it looked down upon as a degree, and is it enjoyable?
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04MR17
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(Original post by whichuni050100)
I know I want to work with children, but what's an Education course like?

Is it worth spending all the money when there are other ways to get into teaching?

Is it looked down upon as a degree, and is it enjoyable?
An Education (BA) course is not a route into teaching. It's a valid degree from which you can go into teaching, just like Chemistry or English. Education (BA) is the conceptual study of Education within society and the analysis of policy in social, economic, geographical, religious, political contexts.

It's not particularly hands-on and many of the graduates from these programmes end up occupying roles in education outside of teaching.

If you're interested in Primary Teaching then a Primary Education degree will be a lot more child-centred, a lot more engaged with classroom pedagogy and often will qualify you to teach (if a degree has "with QTS" written in the title, that means you can become a teacher from it).
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whichuni050100
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(Original post by 04MR17)
An Education (BA) course is not a route into teaching. It's a valid degree from which you can go into teaching, just like Chemistry or English. Education (BA) is the conceptual study of Education within society and the analysis of policy in social, economic, geographical, religious, political contexts.

It's not particularly hands-on and many of the graduates from these programmes end up occupying roles in education outside of teaching.

If you're interested in Primary Teaching then a Primary Education degree will be a lot more child-centred, a lot more engaged with classroom pedagogy and often will qualify you to teach (if a degree has "with QTS" written in the title, that means you can become a teacher from it).
That’s interesting, thank you. What sort of other occupations do people go into, do you know?
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Liverpool Hope University
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(Original post by whichuni050100)
I know I want to work with children, but what's an Education course like?

Is it worth spending all the money when there are other ways to get into teaching?

Is it looked down upon as a degree, and is it enjoyable?

Hey whichuni050100 :hello:

Sorry if I'm a little late to this discussion. I second what 04MR17 says (hello 04MR17, hope you're well).

Education courses tend to be more about the concept of Education rather than the pedagogy. In other words an Education course will not be focused around 'how to teach' as such and instead more theoretical.

I studied this course at Liverpool Hope and found it interesting to deconstruct Education from a number of different perspectives. For example, my course was split into 4 disciplines of: History, Sociology, Psychology and Philosophy of Education.

When I was choosing a course I was really unsure about whether or not I wanted to go into teaching or not. If you are certain you want to go into teaching then a Primary Education with QTS course may be more suited for yourself. If you are unsure, like myself, it may be worth looking in to some Education courses in that case. By the end of my course I knew that I did not want to go into teaching, however, the option for a PGCE was always there (which many of my class went on to do) so teaching afterwards would always be an option. Those that did go on to PGCE's started the course with the underlying knowledge of the Education system, past Educational Acts and social implications too.

In terms of some graduate opportunities, there are a range of Postgraduate opportunities if you wanted to continue with studying. I combined my Education course with Special Educational Needs and stayed in academia by doing a MA part time in Disability Studies. I do this alongside working for the university in Student Recruitment. A large part of my job has involved working with Shaping Futures with a focus on Widening Participation. As I did focus on access to Higher Education within my degree and challenging access for individuals from low socio-economic backgrounds, I was able to use this in my current role to raise aspirations of children from the schools we work with. So although I am not in teaching currently, I chose a path in higher education and my degree has certainly been useful. Other people on my course, as I say, went on to do a PGCE and are now qualified teachers.... others have gone into more pastoral roles.

I hope this helps in some way, but of course do give me a shout if there is anything I can help with

Ruth:rave:
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whichuni050100
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Hey Ruth, thank you so much, that's so helpful!

I'm really interested in working with children who have additional needs as well. Did you enjoy the course then? And can I ask what sort of career within the field do you hope to go into?

Also (sorry for all the questions) can I ask for a little more description about what sorts of pastoral work people on your course went into/do they enjoy it? If you know!

Rosie x
(Original post by Liverpool Hope University)
Hey whichuni050100 :hello:

Sorry if I'm a little late to this discussion. I second what 04MR17 says (hello 04MR17, hope you're well).

Education courses tend to be more about the concept of Education rather than the pedagogy. In other words an Education course will not be focused around 'how to teach' as such and instead more theoretical.

I studied this course at Liverpool Hope and found it interesting to deconstruct Education from a number of different perspectives. For example, my course was split into 4 disciplines of: History, Sociology, Psychology and Philosophy of Education.

When I was choosing a course I was really unsure about whether or not I wanted to go into teaching or not. If you are certain you want to go into teaching then a Primary Education with QTS course may be more suited for yourself. If you are unsure, like myself, it may be worth looking in to some Education courses in that case. By the end of my course I knew that I did not want to go into teaching, however, the option for a PGCE was always there (which many of my class went on to do) so teaching afterwards would always be an option. Those that did go on to PGCE's started the course with the underlying knowledge of the Education system, past Educational Acts and social implications too.

In terms of some graduate opportunities, there are a range of Postgraduate opportunities if you wanted to continue with studying. I combined my Education course with Special Educational Needs and stayed in academia by doing a MA part time in Disability Studies. I do this alongside working for the university in Student Recruitment. A large part of my job has involved working with Shaping Futures with a focus on Widening Participation. As I did focus on access to Higher Education within my degree and challenging access for individuals from low socio-economic backgrounds, I was able to use this in my current role to raise aspirations of children from the schools we work with. So although I am not in teaching currently, I chose a path in higher education and my degree has certainly been useful. Other people on my course, as I say, went on to do a PGCE and are now qualified teachers.... others have gone into more pastoral roles.

I hope this helps in some way, but of course do give me a shout if there is anything I can help with

Ruth:rave:
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Liverpool Hope University
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(Original post by whichuni050100)
Hey Ruth, thank you so much, that's so helpful!

I'm really interested in working with children who have additional needs as well. Did you enjoy the course then? And can I ask what sort of career within the field do you hope to go into?

Also (sorry for all the questions) can I ask for a little more description about what sorts of pastoral work people on your course went into/do they enjoy it? If you know!

Rosie x
Hey whichuni050100

In that case you may be interested in the Special Educational Needs and Education combination course that I studied. There is also a Disability Studies in Education course that you may also be interested in. These courses critique how disability is viewed within wider society and within education. It definitely lays a good foundation for going on into teaching, giving you the space to think critically about current education structures so that you can aim to be inclusive within your own practice in the classroom. I enjoyed this course so much that I still study within this area for MA and will hopefully stay within academia.

In terms of career, my initial goal at the start of my MA course was to go on to a PHD and work towards becoming a lecturer. However, my thoughts now may be to work within areas such as student support within higher education, within disability arts organisations,or even disability and employment.

Some pastoral roles have been student support in colleges, supporting students with additional needs. Also some friends have went on to provide 1-1 support for children in schools or working within the school to improve their inclusion practices. Others have went on to work for disability arts organisations etc..... there really is a wide scope of different areas afterwards as well as postgraduate course opportunities and Teacher Training.

I hope this gives you an insight into other options that are not teaching, yet can lead you into teaching later on should you wish to consider it then. Please do ask away, I'm more than happy to share my experiences of studying these courses and sharing my passion for these areas. Similarly, I'm happy to share my experience just as a student in Hope in general if you have any questions about student life too.

Ruth
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