Aimee_101
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I spend most my time making flashcards but the problem is, it takes me months on end to make full revision notes for whole topics and I feel like I'm really behind for this reason and its taking me too much time. Thing is when I make revision cards i don't learn them straight after I leave it and tell I've gotten through the whole syllabus to memorise everything because I get scared that I will run out of time and not manage to make notes on abosultley everything. I don't find que cards easy to remember from either, I have to go through them at least 3 x over and over it's so boring. My teacher keeps giving our class mocks as well alongside me getting homework from other subjects it means i can't properly revise the whole syllabus because i feel like I have to revise the specific stuff he's told us to revise. It's march and I've got 2 massive mocks and another 2 in April and I keep getting stressed for them and I feel that it stunts my revision for the real thing. I don't think I have enough time to make flashcards for the whole of sociology and I'm scared I'm running out of time I don't know what else to do. (This is A level btw)
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S_x_m_x
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Have you tried doing pastpapers
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Sinnoh
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Do practice questions and stop wasting your time making so many flashcards.

It's the exams that actually give you your grade, so learn how to do the exam. Try doing a few papers or exercises 'open book' just to get used to the style of questions. Then try it without your notes so you know which areas need the most work. I'm in year 13 and I've never made a flashcard in my life.

Memorising a hundred flashcards inside out won't give you the grades. Answering the exam paper properly will.
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Aimee_101
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Do you find you can memorise the whole syllabus in detail that way? Not to be nosey, but what did you get and in what subjects? I find that for the sciences and maths just doing past paper questions is usually enough, but for essay based subjects where you have to memorise a breadth of detail to condtructs essay's, I fear that might not work so well.
(Original post by Sinnoh)
Do practice questions and stop wasting your time making so many flashcards.

It's the exams that actually give you your grade, so learn how to do the exam. Try doing a few papers or exercises 'open book' just to get used to the style of questions. Then try it without your notes so you know which areas need the most work. I'm in year 13 and I've never made a flashcard in my life.

Memorising a hundred flashcards inside out won't give you the grades. Answering the exam paper properly will.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Aimee_101)
Do you find you can memorise the whole syllabus in detail that way? Not to be nosey, but what did you get and in what subjects? I find that for the sciences and maths just doing past paper questions is usually enough, but for essay based subjects where you have to memorise a breadth of detail to condtructs essay's, I fear that might not work so well.
Fair enough. So with the essay/memory-intensive subjects I did, I got an 8 in English lit and a 7 in English language, plus A* in history and German.
I didn't actively try to memorise the syllabus - I think that just came with doing the questions and helping out people in my class.

With English and history I remember making lots of essay plans, even if I didn't actually do the essay it was helpful to just connect together the ideas, arguments and evidence. I would still recommend you do some essays (or even just mini-essays, like do one paragraph) because once you actually apply what you've tried to memorise, I think you remember it a bit better.
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Aimee_101
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Fair enough. So with the essay/memory-intensive subjects I did, I got an 8 in English lit and a 7 in English language, plus A* in history and German.
I didn't actively try to memorise the syllabus - I think that just came with doing the questions and helping out people in my class.

With English and history I remember making lots of essay plans, even if I didn't actually do the essay it was helpful to just connect together the ideas, arguments and evidence. I would still recommend you do some essays (or even just mini-essays, like do one paragraph) because once you actually apply what you've tried to memorise, I think you remember it a bit better.
Sorry, I meant for A levels? Unless you haven't already taken them
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Aimee_101)
Sorry, I meant for A levels? Unless you haven't already taken them
My bad. Been predicted 4 A*s and in my mocks I got A*ABB. (A in history)
Well, for history I still do make essay plans when I've got an unseen essay coming up. Rote-learning facts is something I try to avoid as much as possible because it's so boring. When I had a Tudor history mock to revise for, I did a load of mini-essays on individual sources. And when I had an unseen closed-book civil rights essay, I practically rewrote the one I'd done a week prior because the info had stuck in my head better from actually making an essay out of it.
I'm sure this is transferable for sociology - the idea of writing a short essay is to save time spent in total and really hone your knowledge in on a particular area.
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sotor
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i have the same problem! but remember, set past papers and homework is revision, just because you didn't schedule it doesnt mean it isnt helping you

also yeah honestly just abandon the flashcards at this point except for key studies/cases or quotes. for essay subjects id focus a lot on exam technique and planning essays - will help you remember the content as you'll have to look through it to find the points you want to make and it will help you to recall them by connecting them in your mind.
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Aimee_101
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(Original post by sotor)
i have the same problem! but remember, set past papers and homework is revision, just because you didn't schedule it doesnt mean it isnt helping you

also yeah honestly just abandon the flashcards at this point except for key studies/cases or quotes. for essay subjects id focus a lot on exam technique and planning essays - will help you remember the content as you'll have to look through it to find the points you want to make and it will help you to recall them by connecting them in your mind.
So, I basically have to get through a whole topic in psychology. Instead of learning specifics through flashcards do you think I should just go straight into past papers and do them as I work through the syllabus? The only problem I find Is I don't know how else to learn materials unless I have something to actively memorise from... Idk, Its so annoying, I've been in education for over a decade yet, I still don't know how to best revise. I'm really not prepared for these A levels :/
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