Frostbun
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In my textbook it says because the daughter nuclei produced have a higher binding energy per nucleon, but I don't understand how this answers my question.

Surely energy would be released if the daughter nuclei had a lower binding energy per nucleon, as the energy released would make up for the difference in binding energy between the first nucleus and the daughter nucleus?

I am very confused on this topic if it wasnt easy to tell :')
Thanks in advance
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anosmianAcrimony
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Binding energy between nucleons means the energy required to pull those nucleons apart. It's also the amount of energy that's released when those nucleons are put together in the first place. So if you dismantle a nucleus with a lower binding energy and build some nuclei with a higher total binding energy, you will get out more energy than you've put in.

Does that make sense? If you've still got questions, don't hesitate to ask.
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Frostbun)
In my textbook it says because the daughter nuclei produced have a higher binding energy per nucleon, but I don't understand how this answers my question.

Surely energy would be released if the daughter nuclei had a lower binding energy per nucleon, as the energy released would make up for the difference in binding energy between the first nucleus and the daughter nucleus?

I am very confused on this topic if it wasnt easy to tell :'
Thanks in advance
I agree that this topic has some confusing concepts or seemingly contradicting concepts.

I would add to what anosmianAcrimony had explained in terms of the definition(s) of binding energy. Quite well explained.

If you have studied chemistry, you would have come across phrases or terms like “bond-forming involves releasing energy” and “bond-breaking involves taking in of energy”. In forming of “more stable” products, energy is released during a reaction. Energy is taken in to form a “less stable” product in a reaction.

Using similar ideas (I hope it) would help to see “why” energy is released during a fission reaction when the daughter nuclei have more binding energy per nucleon. As the daughter nuclei have more binding energy per nucleon, the “bonds” in the daughter nuclei would be stronger, energy is released to form the stronger “bonds”.

Another way of seeing it is in terms of the “rest mass” of the parent nucleus and daughter nuclei. The total “rest mass” of the daughter nuclei is less than that of the parent nucleus. The decrease in “rest mass” has a corresponding increase in binding energy.
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