Dealing With Depression at University?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi!

So I'm a first year at uni and I've had symptoms of depression for around 3/4 years now, but its only now that my counsellor that I've started recently seeing has said that I am, in fact, depressed.

I feel like I'm struggling a lot, and everything feels difficult, and I've been getting massively behind on my work. I've always managed to be a relatively good student despite what I'm dealing with, but since coming to uni (about three hours away from home), things feel like they're slipping an awful lot more.

And at this point, I'm just really lost about what to do. Dropping out isn't really an option - nor something that I want to do at all - but talking things through with a counsellor isn't doing a lot to combat just feeling bad most of the time. The idea of antidepressants is a bit scary, and the last time I went to a doctor they said it might not be worth it since I'm so young, and I could be setting myself up for a lifetime on them - that is, if they even end up making much difference.

I guess ultimately what I'm asking for is just some kind of advice. Its never as simple as 'get on with things' or 'just exercise more', and I'm getting more and more scared of living my whole life like this.
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marinade
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#2
Report 1 year ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
And at this point, I'm just really lost about what to do. Dropping out isn't really an option - nor something that I want to do at all - but talking things through with a counsellor isn't doing a lot to combat just feeling bad most of the time. The idea of antidepressants is a bit scary, and the last time I went to a doctor they said it might not be worth it since I'm so young, and I could be setting myself up for a lifetime on them - that is, if they even end up making much difference.

I guess ultimately what I'm asking for is just some kind of advice. Its never as simple as 'get on with things' or 'just exercise more', and I'm getting more and more scared of living my whole life like this.
Therapy doesn't work for everyone. So called antidepressants don't work for everyone (where 'work' is quite an interesting semantic argument). Always a difficult conversation to have because if you start quoting stats people react differently some will say things like well if the rates are that low then why bother whereas other people will be positive and wow, this is great that there is a treatment that works in so many patients for such a debilitating disease. There's that whole difficult conversation about people often have to try a few before they find one that works better.

I'm sure the doctor has their reasons for saying that, if you saw them a while back there are different guidelines on medications depending on age. Or maybe they were being very honest of their experiences prescribing.

At uni it is such a vastly long time, but you will likely have very large ups and downs, maybe more the downs by the sounds of it.
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999tigger
Badges: 19
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi!

So I'm a first year at uni and I've had symptoms of depression for around 3/4 years now, but its only now that my counsellor that I've started recently seeing has said that I am, in fact, depressed.

I feel like I'm struggling a lot, and everything feels difficult, and I've been getting massively behind on my work. I've always managed to be a relatively good student despite what I'm dealing with, but since coming to uni (about three hours away from home), things feel like they're slipping an awful lot more.

And at this point, I'm just really lost about what to do. Dropping out isn't really an option - nor something that I want to do at all - but talking things through with a counsellor isn't doing a lot to combat just feeling bad most of the time. The idea of antidepressants is a bit scary, and the last time I went to a doctor they said it might not be worth it since I'm so young, and I could be setting myself up for a lifetime on them - that is, if they even end up making much difference.

I guess ultimately what I'm asking for is just some kind of advice. Its never as simple as 'get on with things' or 'just exercise more', and I'm getting more and more scared of living my whole life like this.
Uni is the last place I would want to be with depression. I always suggest trying to get it under control before you go. You need to remember that with MH then the very thing you use to assess your wellbeing is not working properly and clouds how you see things.

Talking therapies are good along with making changes. The common response is that people believe they cam deal with it by themselves, when in fact they have spent years in not dealing with it at all.

Carry on talking with the therapist and see your GP.
If talking therapy.
Exercise.
Other strategies havent worked, then what have you got to lose with trying medication for a month? They help some people and not all.

Do you have any idea of the causes?

My other tip is by seeing third parties such as your GP, then you create a record of attempting to deal with the issue and that may be very significant for your degree and finance later on. Its common to see people with no evidence and who have just got more depressed, then hide in their room. That leaves them with no evidence for extenuating circumstances to the uni or student finance.

Why isnt dropping out or taking an interruption of studies an option? If its not then you are going to have to weigh up your options and et on with making some positive changes or at least testing what works.

It is possible to beat but different things work for different people and it also takes a different amount of time.

Try just taking it one day at a time and looking after yourself. Eat, sleep, socialise, do the right amount of work and a few things each day which make you feel good.

If medication is the only thing you havent tried then I suggest you do and make a decent attempt rather than ruling it out if you dont see instant improvement.

https://www.counselling.cam.ac.uk/se...ewselhe/depres

PS let your department know.
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lilacdolphin
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#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi!

So I'm a first year at uni and I've had symptoms of depression for around 3/4 years now, but its only now that my counsellor that I've started recently seeing has said that I am, in fact, depressed.

I feel like I'm struggling a lot, and everything feels difficult, and I've been getting massively behind on my work. I've always managed to be a relatively good student despite what I'm dealing with, but since coming to uni (about three hours away from home), things feel like they're slipping an awful lot more.

And at this point, I'm just really lost about what to do. Dropping out isn't really an option - nor something that I want to do at all - but talking things through with a counsellor isn't doing a lot to combat just feeling bad most of the time. The idea of antidepressants is a bit scary, and the last time I went to a doctor they said it might not be worth it since I'm so young, and I could be setting myself up for a lifetime on them - that is, if they even end up making much difference.

I guess ultimately what I'm asking for is just some kind of advice. Its never as simple as 'get on with things' or 'just exercise more', and I'm getting more and more scared of living my whole life like this.
I would say one of the most important things is to make sure you have a good group of friends who will support you. Starting uni is such a big life change and going through that with MH issues must be so difficult. It seems really positive that you've accepted your diagnosis. Have you visited your GP again? You never know what they might be able to do for you - they might know of support groups or other alternatives to medication in your area. I think it's perfectly normal to be hesitant about trying antidepressants and that's a decision that you will need to make yourself.

Do you get to go home a lot? If things are feeling like too much it can sometimes be nice to go home and be looked after for a weekend. Also I tend to find that (though I am loathe to say it) mums and dads often have quite useful advice.
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