GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
The title says it all, i have learnt almost all of the words on the aqa spec, what should i do next? I struggle on speaking and writing especially.
0
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#2
If this post can blow up that would be great!
0
reply
Jazzybear01
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
Hmmm I'm not sure if aiming for a 9 in AQA french is even viable, not in my case of course. I got a 7 after doing my second mock and I felt quite comfortable thinking that I'd achieve a 7 or above at the final exam. When I sat the final exam, the Listening paper was absolutely hard, I couldn't understand a single word! It was the same case for so many others in my school. The reading paper was hard but it wasn't as ridiculous compared to listening. I ended up getting a 6 at the end. I can either blame the AQA curriculum for being too harsh or maybe it was my school's fault for not teaching us sufficiently enough.

Either way, I would focus a lot on listening and writing if I were you and not worry too much about reading or speaking . Having great listening skills will be needed so that you can understand the accent and cope with the speed of the persons voice. It would also be helpful to have a good pronounciation at the speaking test. Even though most students have their cliche british style accent, it would be good to build a rapport with whoever's testing you at the speaking test by having a good accent and pronounciation.
0
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
thanks for the feedback
(Original post by Jazzybear01)
Hmmm I'm not sure if aiming for a 9 in AQA french is even viable, not in my case of course. I got a 7 after doing my second mock and I felt quite comfortable thinking that I'd achieve a 7 or above at the final exam. When I sat the final exam, the Listening paper was absolutely hard, I couldn't understand a single word! It was the same case for so many others in my school. The reading paper was hard but it wasn't as ridiculous compared to listening. I ended up getting a 6 at the end. I can either blame the AQA curriculum for being too harsh or maybe it was my school's fault for not teaching us sufficiently enough.

Either way, I would focus a lot on listening and writing if I were you and not worry too much about reading or speaking . Having great listening skills will be needed so that you can understand the accent and cope with the speed of the persons voice. It would also be helpful to have a good pronounciation at the speaking test. Even though most students have their cliche british style accent, it would be good to build a rapport with whoever's testing you at the speaking test by having a good accent and pronounciation.
0
reply
asoar
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
I would say practice A level past papers (especially for the listening) as the exams you will take will be much harder than the old GCSE past papers so they won't be that helpful.
0
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Hi, I used to teach French and was a private tutor for a while, maybe I can help. To be great at all aspects of French, you need to know the vocab. So first get hold of some past reading papers for your exam board. Then get a file and a good (Collins) large dictionary. Write down the words you don't know and memorise them. Also any useful phrases. These can then be recycled and used for your writing and speaking exams. Look at the words/phrases that apply to your own life and learn them especially. I note few state schools give students past papers to practice with, and this is a tragedy for their subsequent marks. When I used to do private coaching, we did nothing but past papers and they all got good marks. I also made up a little vocab/phrase test for the next lesson, so they had to revise. Most of them did quite well. My elder son did especially well at the papers, and ended up reading German at Oxford. I have just given someone else some advice on speaking. I will get hold of my post and copy it here. Bonne chance, and ask me anything else if you need it.
(Original post by GetGradenines)
The title says it all, i have learnt almost all of the words on the aqa spec, what should i do next? I struggle on speaking and writing especially.
1
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by GetGradenines)
The title says it all, i have learnt almost all of the words on the aqa spec, what should i do next? I struggle on speaking and writing especially.
For the picture part of the oral exam...
Are you given the photo in advance? I know my son could take his own photo in. If so, you can look things up in advance and memorise it if you like.
Make sure you include all 3 tenses for extra marks. My son had a photo of his friends on a school trip to Italy. He said they were also there yesterday. They are enjoying themselves now, and will all maybe come back again someday. Imagine what the boys are thinking. Plenty of opinions helps. What are they drinking? Or eating? Is one carrying a rucksack? Has somebody bought a souvenir? What is the resort like? Is there lots to do? For example someone was riding past them on a bike - include that. You can fit this in with the vocab you know. The teacher will ask you some questions about it, so think of questions he/she may ask, then look up the answers in a dictionary, write them down and memorise the answers. Also ask your friends/family the questions they would ask about the photo, just in case you have missed something. They may ask you about the weather in the pic etc so you can bring out the set phrases you should know.

As for the speaking exam, you can use the set phrases you know to build up a profile of yourself and write these down and learn. For example, where do you live? Is it in the town or the countryside? What do you think of it? What is your house like? Your room? Your school? What are your favourite subjects? And the worst teachers? Hobbies etc. Think of plenty of opinions so you can embellish your replies. And there may be a situation, such as asking the way to somewhere. Revise the relevant sections of your text book and maybe write down some key phrases of situational vocab and revise. The speaking tests are quite easy as the questions will not be anything new and you can pre-empt the replies and revise for them. The reading and listening sections, however, may introduce new words you may not be familiar with. Do not panic if you come across these words, as you do not need to know everything.
0
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
People generally find languages exams the hardest. this is why you should unload, practice and write down unfamiliar vocab you glean from the reading questions of past papers. Then you will fill the gaps in your vocab. You can even find new cool words or phrases you can bring out and dazzle your teacher/examiners.
(Original post by Jazzybear01)
Hmmm I'm not sure if aiming for a 9 in AQA french is even viable, not in my case of course. I got a 7 after doing my second mock and I felt quite comfortable thinking that I'd achieve a 7 or above at the final exam. When I sat the final exam, the Listening paper was absolutely hard, I couldn't understand a single word! It was the same case for so many others in my school. The reading paper was hard but it wasn't as ridiculous compared to listening. I ended up getting a 6 at the end. I can either blame the AQA curriculum for being too harsh or maybe it was my school's fault for not teaching us sufficiently enough.

Either way, I would focus a lot on listening and writing if I were you and not worry too much about reading or speaking . Having great listening skills will be needed so that you can understand the accent and cope with the speed of the persons voice. It would also be helpful to have a good pronounciation at the speaking test. Even though most students have their cliche british style accent, it would be good to build a rapport with whoever's testing you at the speaking test by having a good accent and pronounciation.
0
reply
9999999999
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
For writing, the best way to practice is by doing loads of translations - I have attached loads of these.
For speaking (and writing practice), download all of the specimen role plays and photo cards from the AQA website and give yourself 12 minutes to write one of each out. This way you will be confident that in the exam you will be able to write down full, developed answers for these tasks in the prep time. They are also questions that could come up in the general conversation. Then read your answers out to yourself, practising pronunciation.
1
reply
med923
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
I got a 9 in the new AQA French GCSE last year. My biggest tips would be to have a bank of complex phrases that you can use for each topic in both the oral and the writing. Make sure you know these inside out. For the writing I made up an acronym containing all the different things I wanted to include e.g. adverbs, comparisons, après avoir (after having..). Ive forgotten the rest now but I'm sure you know the kind of things I mean. The listening is what most people find the hardest bit but just do all the mocks available to you and try not to stress too much as it is so ridiculously hard that literally no-one does well in it! Finally I'd say to not get too stressed as one benefit of the exam being so hard is that the grade boundaries are ridiculously low!!Good luck
1
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
Thanks for all of these helpful replies and resources
0
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
Do you have the mark schemes for the translation. Or should i ask my teacher to mark them. Thanks
(Original post by 9999999999)
For writing, the best way to practice is by doing loads of translations - I have attached loads of these.
For speaking (and writing practice), download all of the specimen role plays and photo cards from the AQA website and give yourself 12 minutes to write one of each out. This way you will be confident that in the exam you will be able to write down full, developed answers for these tasks in the prep time. They are also questions that could come up in the general conversation. Then read your answers out to yourself, practising pronunciation.
0
reply
9999999999
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by med923)
I got a 9 in the new AQA French GCSE last year. My biggest tips would be to have a bank of complex phrases that you can use for each topic in both the oral and the writing. Make sure you know these inside out. For the writing I made up an acronym containing all the different things I wanted to include e.g. adverbs, comparisons, après avoir (after having..). Ive forgotten the rest now but I'm sure you know the kind of things I mean. The listening is what most people find the hardest bit but just do all the mocks available to you and try not to stress too much as it is so ridiculously hard that literally no-one does well in it! Finally I'd say to not get too stressed as one benefit of the exam being so hard is that the grade boundaries are ridiculously low!!Good luck
I do this with writing too, I have a checklist of all the tenses and try to include all in the 32 marker and most in the 16 marker:

•• present
•• perfect
•• immediate future
•• imperative
•• future
•• imperfect
•• conditional
•• pluperfect
•• passive voice: future, imperfect and perfect tenses (R)
•• perfect infinitive
•• present participle, including use after en
•• subjunctive mood: present, in commonly used expressions (R)
•• perfect conditional.
1
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#14
A grade 9 in french would be great for me, went from getting 20-40% in my mocks, to almost getting a grade 8 in my last french reading mock.
(Original post by med923)
I got a 9 in the new AQA French GCSE last year. My biggest tips would be to have a bank of complex phrases that you can use for each topic in both the oral and the writing. Make sure you know these inside out. For the writing I made up an acronym containing all the different things I wanted to include e.g. adverbs, comparisons, après avoir (after having..). Ive forgotten the rest now but I'm sure you know the kind of things I mean. The listening is what most people find the hardest bit but just do all the mocks available to you and try not to stress too much as it is so ridiculously hard that literally no-one does well in it! Finally I'd say to not get too stressed as one benefit of the exam being so hard is that the grade boundaries are ridiculously low!!Good luck
0
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#15
These resources and replies are so great to see, i hope you excell in your studies and in your life. Normally, i get very few replies on TSR (this is an alt account) but you guys have been a great help. I have the cgp french guide for higher tier aswell as the workbook. i will complete it before may and i will memorise grade 8/9 phrases and verbs so i can paste them in my essays.
0
reply
med923
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
I got a 7 in my mock and then a 9 in the real thing! I'd love to tell you it was through lots of hard work but honestly I didn't prioritise French over my other subjects. One thing that really worked in my favour was that it was one of my first exams, meaning I could just get it over with!
I'd say just to make sure you know your exam technique with the writing. The 16 and 32 markers are testing completely different skills. From what I remember, the 16 marker was a lot more specific, while the 32 was more general. Make sure in the 16 marker to answer the question exactly. I think you get 3 or 4 bullet points for the 16 and 2 for the 32.. For the 16 marker I structured my answer with a paragraph for each bullet point, but with each paragraph only containing 2 or 3 sentences. The 16 marker tests more accuracy, while the 32 marker is where you should use your more complex and daring phrases, and expand your answers in greater detail.
(Original post by GetGradenines)
A grade 9 in french would be great for me, went from getting 20-40% in my mocks, to almost getting a grade 8 in my last french reading mock.
0
reply
med923
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by GetGradenines)
These resources and replies are so great to see, i hope you excell in your studies and in your life. Normally, i get very few replies on TSR (this is an alt account) but you guys have been a great help. I have the cgp french guide for higher tier aswell as the workbook. i will complete it before may and i will memorise grade 8/9 phrases and verbs so i can paste them in my essays.
Ahah can you tell I'm just trying to procrastinate doing my A Level maths assignment?
0
reply
labrador716
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
I got a 9 in my mocks after getting a 6 in year 10 - here's my best advice:
listening - the reading time at the start of the paper should be the most intense 5 minutes - it's not just a preview. write all keywords to do with choices or questions on and around questions so that when you get there you know what you're listening out for. During the actual exam they try and trick you as much as they can with red herring phrases, so memorise and look out for any of these phrases - eg negatives, my sister thinks...
reading - underline where you get your answers from in the texts, if you don't know a word use context - if you really can't tell make an educated guess.
speaking - practise lots, and get a bank of phrases that you can use for the general conversation. there aren't that many different topics they can ask about, so if you have at least thought about what you would say for all the topics you won't be left speechless in the exam - also lots of higher-level grammar phrases can be used for a lot of topics (eg après m'être reveillé + school day/daily routine/weekend plans etc.). You aren't expected to have as much complex language in the speaking exam as the writing as it's spontaneous. Write your full answers to the role play and the photo card in the preparation time. Find a load of photos online and think of what you would say in the exam - you don't even have to write French answers, just train yourself to say what's in the background, what the weather is etc.
writing - as other people have said, get a checklist of tenses, but of other things as well: using dont, expressions followed by the infinitive etc. However, for the 16 marker, it's perfectly possible to get 16/16 with simple tenses and sentence structures but high accuracy. Try not to go over the word count too much as it increases the chance that you've made mistakes - a perfect 90-word piece just using 3 tenses that covers all the bullet points gets 16/16, a long piece using subjunctive and passive but sometimes incorrectly and might forget one bullet point can get 10/16.
translation - translate every single word - even if you get stuck just skip it and keep going. Translate meaning exactly (eg if they say 'I'm going to' use aller + infinitive not the normal future) and don't skip words, even if you think it makes it sound more natural in English.
In general learn vocab, it's the most important part of the listening and reading exams, and a different style of revision to most other subjects. If you don't like Memrise/Quizlet I'd recommend buying French kids books and looking up any words you don't know. The French translations of Roald Dahl books / Harry Potter are fun and are pretty accessible.
1
reply
9999999999
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by GetGradenines)
Do you have the mark schemes for the translation. Or should i ask my teacher to mark them. Thanks
Unfortunately there are no mark schemes but you can either ask your teacher to check them or put your answers through Google Translate.
0
reply
GetGradenines
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by med923)
I got a 7 in my mock and then a 9 in the real thing! I'd love to tell you it was through lots of hard work but honestly I didn't prioritise French over my other subjects. One thing that really worked in my favour was that it was one of my first exams, meaning I could just get it over with!
I'd say just to make sure you know your exam technique with the writing. The 16 and 32 markers are testing completely different skills. From what I remember, the 16 marker was a lot more specific, while the 32 was more general. Make sure in the 16 marker to answer the question exactly. I think you get 3 or 4 bullet points for the 16 and 2 for the 32.. For the 16 marker I structured my answer with a paragraph for each bullet point, but with each paragraph only containing 2 or 3 sentences. The 16 marker tests more accuracy, while the 32 marker is where you should use your more complex and daring phrases, and expand your answers in greater detail.
Thanks for you for this, it is the same for me, french is one of the first gcses,after computer science,which is over and done with in the first week.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (52)
15.81%
I'm not sure (8)
2.43%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (112)
34.04%
I have already dropped out (6)
1.82%
I'm not a current university student (151)
45.9%

Watched Threads

View All