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What could I say about hale in the last two pages of act 3?
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jamesg2
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The Reverend Hale

The Reverend John Hale was the preacher in nearby Bass River which was later to be named Beverly. Arthur Miller is clearly of the opinion that when he arrived in Salem he was out of his depth. He is book-learned minister who relies on what his books tell him. When he arrives he agrees that his books are heavy because “they are weighted with authority.” P. 30

He is extremely confident in his understanding and knowledge of what his books tell him. “We cannot look to superstition in this. The Devil is precise, the marks of his presence are definite as stone.” P. 31

When asked by the Rev. Parris why his house should be affected Hale replies “What victory would the Devil have to win a soul already bad? It is the best the Devil wants, and who is better than the minister?” P. 34 It is a telling argument and theory. In any search for the cause look first at the good and upright in any society,

The first serious challenge to his position is when he is required to question the Proctor’s. When John Proctor is asked to name the commandments he is unable to name all ten. Elizabeth names the one he has forgotten. Proctor turns to Hale and states that between the two of them they know the commandments.

Hale replies “Theology, sir is a fortress; no crack in a fortress may be accounted small. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought)” P. 55.Note the stage directions. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought) The phrase “he seems worried” indicates that a small weakness like not remembering all 10 commandments, for Hale illustrates a person’s weakness in religion. That small error is enough for Hale to question many other aspects of John Proctor. Theocracy does not allow any weaknesses in religion. Theocracy does not give credit for normal human weakness. Not remembering all 10 Commandments is a clear weakness in the person’s religious standing. This is further compounded by the needle in the poppet. Proctor demands that Hale does not take that as evidence. Miller’s stage directions are important. “Hale, Struck by the proof is silent.” This Miller comment underlines the question of what constitutes “Proof.” What Hale sees as “proof” is that that Abigail screams that Elizabeth stuck needles in her and now under a poppet in her house such a needle is found. The verb “struck” underlines how compelling Hale finds this as evidence. His “silence” underlines how convinced he is that this is indeed proof. What this moment also illustrates is Hysteria. This is shown by the ease by which Hale is able to be made to agree that this is indeed proof. Not to agree would require the questioning of Abigail and that is impossible.

The act ends with Proctor throwing him out of their house.

Quote 1 Get y’ gone with them. You are a broken minister.P. 63

Quote 2 You are a coward! Though you be ordained in God’s own tears, you are a coward now! P. 64

These two quotes by John Proctor demonstrate the moral weakness in Rev. Hale. The phrase “broken minister” underlines Proctor’s charge against Hale. He sees him as a politician, not prepared to confront Danforth’s warrant for Elizabeth.
In the second quote, Proctor’s indignation that Hale suggestion that he will support Elizabeth in court is underlined by the use of exclamation marks. Like the first quote Proctor is convinced that he is being political. Hence the accusation of being a coward.

Reverend Hale in Act 3:-

Much has changed between Act 2 and Act 3 and so has Reverend Hale’s opinion chnaged. The dogmatic autocrat who was guided by books and theocracy is no more. The reality of the executions - which he has had to watch - have changed him.

Quote 1 We cannot blink it more. There is a prodigious fear of this court in the country -P. 78

Quote one underlines a reality of the consequences of the trials in Salem village. The use of the dash underlines that Hale knows he is on his own. Danforth overrides him and will not listen to this point. What Hale is pointing out is what is behind the Andover revolt. Ever the politician he is aware that opinion in the country is now changing

Quote 2 I have signed seventy-two death warrants; I am a minister of the Lord, and I dare not take a life without there be a proof so immaculate no slightest qualm of conscience may doubt it P. 80


Quote two indicates the personal reason for the change in Hale. The anguish that Hale has suffered and that has brought about this change is underlined in his use of repetition throughout the speech. In signing the warrants he feels responsible for the deaths he has both signed and had to watch. Note it is not Danforth who signature is on the warrants.

I denounce these proceedings, I quit this court! (He slams the door to the outside behind him.) P. 96

The imprisonment of John Proctor is the last straw for Hale. He knows the mistake Elizabeth made and has tried to defend her and Proctor. Danforth’s comment that he is working with “anti-Christ” P. 96 an outrageous comment. The passion of Hale’s meaning is underlined with the exclamation marks. He is so outraged that he is now shouting at Danforth. Note:- the stage directions. The slamming of the door does not just emphasise his indignation, but also illustrates his severing his support for the sending Giles Corey and Proctor to jail. The “outside behind him” is an interesting quote. The “outside” are those inside the court, they were once very much inside and part of Rev Hale but now they are outside Reverend Hale’s concern.

When you compare the Reverend Hale as seen in the first two acts compared to the Rev Hale in Act 3 we see someone who has grown and appreciates the errors he has made in the past. The reverend Hale who exits in Act 3 is not the same one who entered in Act 1 carrying his heavy books and bookish opinions
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(Original post by jamesg2)
The Reverend Hale

The Reverend John Hale was the preacher in nearby Bass River which was later to be named Beverly. Arthur Miller is clearly of the opinion that when he arrived in Salem he was out of his depth. He is book-learned minister who relies on what his books tell him. When he arrives he agrees that his books are heavy because “they are weighted with authority.” P. 30

He is extremely confident in his understanding and knowledge of what his books tell him. “We cannot look to superstition in this. The Devil is precise, the marks of his presence are definite as stone.” P. 31

When asked by the Rev. Parris why his house should be affected Hale replies “What victory would the Devil have to win a soul already bad? It is the best the Devil wants, and who is better than the minister?” P. 34 It is a telling argument and theory. In any search for the cause look first at the good and upright in any society,

The first serious challenge to his position is when he is required to question the Proctor’s. When John Proctor is asked to name the commandments he is unable to name all ten. Elizabeth names the one he has forgotten. Proctor turns to Hale and states that between the two of them they know the commandments.

Hale replies “Theology, sir is a fortress; no crack in a fortress may be accounted small. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought)” P. 55.Note the stage directions. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought) The phrase “he seems worried” indicates that a small weakness like not remembering all 10 commandments, for Hale illustrates a person’s weakness in religion. That small error is enough for Hale to question many other aspects of John Proctor. Theocracy does not allow any weaknesses in religion. Theocracy does not give credit for normal human weakness. Not remembering all 10 Commandments is a clear weakness in the person’s religious standing. This is further compounded by the needle in the poppet. Proctor demands that Hale does not take that as evidence. Miller’s stage directions are important. “Hale, Struck by the proof is silent.” This Miller comment underlines the question of what constitutes “Proof.” What Hale sees as “proof” is that that Abigail screams that Elizabeth stuck needles in her and now under a poppet in her house such a needle is found. The verb “struck” underlines how compelling Hale finds this as evidence. His “silence” underlines how convinced he is that this is indeed proof. What this moment also illustrates is Hysteria. This is shown by the ease by which Hale is able to be made to agree that this is indeed proof. Not to agree would require the questioning of Abigail and that is impossible.

The act ends with Proctor throwing him out of their house.

Quote 1 Get y’ gone with them. You are a broken minister.P. 63

Quote 2 You are a coward! Though you be ordained in God’s own tears, you are a coward now! P. 64

These two quotes by John Proctor demonstrate the moral weakness in Rev. Hale. The phrase “broken minister” underlines Proctor’s charge against Hale. He sees him as a politician, not prepared to confront Danforth’s warrant for Elizabeth.
In the second quote, Proctor’s indignation that Hale suggestion that he will support Elizabeth in court is underlined by the use of exclamation marks. Like the first quote Proctor is convinced that he is being political. Hence the accusation of being a coward.

Reverend Hale in Act 3:-

Much has changed between Act 2 and Act 3 and so has Reverend Hale’s opinion chnaged. The dogmatic autocrat who was guided by books and theocracy is no more. The reality of the executions - which he has had to watch - have changed him.

Quote 1 We cannot blink it more. There is a prodigious fear of this court in the country -P. 78

Quote one underlines a reality of the consequences of the trials in Salem village. The use of the dash underlines that Hale knows he is on his own. Danforth overrides him and will not listen to this point. What Hale is pointing out is what is behind the Andover revolt. Ever the politician he is aware that opinion in the country is now changing

Quote 2 I have signed seventy-two death warrants; I am a minister of the Lord, and I dare not take a life without there be a proof so immaculate no slightest qualm of conscience may doubt it P. 80


Quote two indicates the personal reason for the change in Hale. The anguish that Hale has suffered and that has brought about this change is underlined in his use of repetition throughout the speech. In signing the warrants he feels responsible for the deaths he has both signed and had to watch. Note it is not Danforth who signature is on the warrants.

I denounce these proceedings, I quit this court! (He slams the door to the outside behind him.) P. 96

The imprisonment of John Proctor is the last straw for Hale. He knows the mistake Elizabeth made and has tried to defend her and Proctor. Danforth’s comment that he is working with “anti-Christ” P. 96 an outrageous comment. The passion of Hale’s meaning is underlined with the exclamation marks. He is so outraged that he is now shouting at Danforth. Note:- the stage directions. The slamming of the door does not just emphasise his indignation, but also illustrates his severing his support for the sending Giles Corey and Proctor to jail. The “outside behind him” is an interesting quote. The “outside” are those inside the court, they were once very much inside and part of Rev Hale but now they are outside Reverend Hale’s concern.

When you compare the Reverend Hale as seen in the first two acts compared to the Rev Hale in Act 3 we see someone who has grown and appreciates the errors he has made in the past. The reverend Hale who exits in Act 3 is not the same one who entered in Act 1 carrying his heavy books and bookish opinions
(Original post by jamesg2)
The Reverend Hale

The Reverend John Hale was the preacher in nearby Bass River which was later to be named Beverly. Arthur Miller is clearly of the opinion that when he arrived in Salem he was out of his depth. He is book-learned minister who relies on what his books tell him. When he arrives he agrees that his books are heavy because “they are weighted with authority.” P. 30

He is extremely confident in his understanding and knowledge of what his books tell him. “We cannot look to superstition in this. The Devil is precise, the marks of his presence are definite as stone.” P. 31

When asked by the Rev. Parris why his house should be affected Hale replies “What victory would the Devil have to win a soul already bad? It is the best the Devil wants, and who is better than the minister?” P. 34 It is a telling argument and theory. In any search for the cause look first at the good and upright in any society,

The first serious challenge to his position is when he is required to question the Proctor’s. When John Proctor is asked to name the commandments he is unable to name all ten. Elizabeth names the one he has forgotten. Proctor turns to Hale and states that between the two of them they know the commandments.

Hale replies “Theology, sir is a fortress; no crack in a fortress may be accounted small. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought)” P. 55.Note the stage directions. (He rises; he seems worried now. He paces a little, in deep thought) The phrase “he seems worried” indicates that a small weakness like not remembering all 10 commandments, for Hale illustrates a person’s weakness in religion. That small error is enough for Hale to question many other aspects of John Proctor. Theocracy does not allow any weaknesses in religion. Theocracy does not give credit for normal human weakness. Not remembering all 10 Commandments is a clear weakness in the person’s religious standing. This is further compounded by the needle in the poppet. Proctor demands that Hale does not take that as evidence. Miller’s stage directions are important. “Hale, Struck by the proof is silent.” This Miller comment underlines the question of what constitutes “Proof.” What Hale sees as “proof” is that that Abigail screams that Elizabeth stuck needles in her and now under a poppet in her house such a needle is found. The verb “struck” underlines how compelling Hale finds this as evidence. His “silence” underlines how convinced he is that this is indeed proof. What this moment also illustrates is Hysteria. This is shown by the ease by which Hale is able to be made to agree that this is indeed proof. Not to agree would require the questioning of Abigail and that is impossible.

The act ends with Proctor throwing him out of their house.

Quote 1 Get y’ gone with them. You are a broken minister.P. 63

Quote 2 You are a coward! Though you be ordained in God’s own tears, you are a coward now! P. 64

These two quotes by John Proctor demonstrate the moral weakness in Rev. Hale. The phrase “broken minister” underlines Proctor’s charge against Hale. He sees him as a politician, not prepared to confront Danforth’s warrant for Elizabeth.
In the second quote, Proctor’s indignation that Hale suggestion that he will support Elizabeth in court is underlined by the use of exclamation marks. Like the first quote Proctor is convinced that he is being political. Hence the accusation of being a coward.

Reverend Hale in Act 3:-

Much has changed between Act 2 and Act 3 and so has Reverend Hale’s opinion chnaged. The dogmatic autocrat who was guided by books and theocracy is no more. The reality of the executions - which he has had to watch - have changed him.

Quote 1 We cannot blink it more. There is a prodigious fear of this court in the country -P. 78

Quote one underlines a reality of the consequences of the trials in Salem village. The use of the dash underlines that Hale knows he is on his own. Danforth overrides him and will not listen to this point. What Hale is pointing out is what is behind the Andover revolt. Ever the politician he is aware that opinion in the country is now changing

Quote 2 I have signed seventy-two death warrants; I am a minister of the Lord, and I dare not take a life without there be a proof so immaculate no slightest qualm of conscience may doubt it P. 80


Quote two indicates the personal reason for the change in Hale. The anguish that Hale has suffered and that has brought about this change is underlined in his use of repetition throughout the speech. In signing the warrants he feels responsible for the deaths he has both signed and had to watch. Note it is not Danforth who signature is on the warrants.

I denounce these proceedings, I quit this court! (He slams the door to the outside behind him.) P. 96

The imprisonment of John Proctor is the last straw for Hale. He knows the mistake Elizabeth made and has tried to defend her and Proctor. Danforth’s comment that he is working with “anti-Christ” P. 96 an outrageous comment. The passion of Hale’s meaning is underlined with the exclamation marks. He is so outraged that he is now shouting at Danforth. Note:- the stage directions. The slamming of the door does not just emphasise his indignation, but also illustrates his severing his support for the sending Giles Corey and Proctor to jail. The “outside behind him” is an interesting quote. The “outside” are those inside the court, they were once very much inside and part of Rev Hale but now they are outside Reverend Hale’s concern.

When you compare the Reverend Hale as seen in the first two acts compared to the Rev Hale in Act 3 we see someone who has grown and appreciates the errors he has made in the past. The reverend Hale who exits in Act 3 is not the same one who entered in Act 1 carrying his heavy books and bookish opinions
Thank you so muchhhh🥰🥰
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