AQA GCSE English Literature 8702 - Paper 1 - 15th May 2019 Watch

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#61
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#61
any questions for Mice and Men?
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Vetrix42
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#62
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Can someone mark this. It is out of 30.

The Question is how Dickens writes about the Cratchit family and their importance in the novel.

In the 5-Act Novella, Dickens uses the Cratchit family to metaphorically represent the plight of the Victorian poor. Dickens uses them to expose the myths about the poor and inflict social responsibility on the upper-class.

In Stave 1, Bob Cratchit is confined to a 'dismal little cell'. The adjective 'dismal' connotes to a gloomy and sombre atmosphere that Bob is forced to work in. Alternatively, it could represent the repetitive long-hour shifts - accustomed to Victorian men and children. Contextually, it gives insight to the attitudes of Dickens towards working-conditions, who experienced this in a factory as a child. Combined with "little, suggests that he is trapped and perhaps abused by the legislation put in place by 'guilty governments'. This is reinforced by "cell", which denotes that Bob is trapped he is a victim/prisoner of capitalism and the insatiable lust for wealth by the social-elite. Perhaps, it exposes how the aristocrats saw their rights of their social inferior as unimportant. The contemporary aristocratic reader is made to critically evaluate their actions and perhaps they are inflicted with guilt by Dickens' moral messages. Dickens uses Bob to draw attention to the flaw in the 1834 Poor Law, and how it gave industrialists immense power which widened the gap between the wealthy and the unfortunate. As exemplified by Bob's "smaller fire". Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose the flaws of Victorian society and call for change.

Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose how material wealth is transient and less valuable in respect to relationships, as exemplified by the recurrent theme of family when Bob "carried Tiny Tim upon his shoulders". The strenuous verb indicates Bob's complete devotion to his children as exemplified in Stave 4 when he "praised the industry ... of Mrs Cratchit and the girls". His love is unconditional as alternatively "carried" implies Tiny Tim is a burden upon his family, a financial strain as there were little laws regarding disability; irregardless Bob and his family's overwhelming love despite having little materially are willing to accept this burden. The reader feels admiration to Bob and are inflicted with social responsibility, as Dickens believed that if the wealthy helped the poor society would prosper.

In Stave 2, Bob Cratchit calls his wife "precious", which denotes to valuable, priceless, however, this is not in a material sense but abstractly, as she is "full of comfort". In a socity gripped by industrialism and capitalism Dickens intentionally structure's Bob's register always to be very "cheerful" and speak "pleasantly" regardless of class. Through his character, Dickens is giving the reader an example of how to act towards one another regardless of class, causing the reader to admire him.

Bob's unwavering love is depicted in Stave 4 when he weeps for his son exclaiming, "My little, little child!". The adjective "little" is repeated adumbrating that Bob is overwhelmed with grief despite Tiny Tim being a burden. Additionally, "little" denotes to innocent, unprotected but more implicitly it highlights the untimely nature of his death in regards to age. Alternatively, Tiny Tim is a victim of capitalism. Dickens' structures his novella to have Tiny Tim's death to be witnessed by Scrooge in order to instigate change within society, as Scrooge is a metaphor for the rich. Scrooge is partially responsibly as he pays Bob poorly, something which was uniform in Victorian society. Scrooge deliberately is made to see his death to see the effects of his own actions upon the less fortunate, hence linking to the theme of responsibility. As a representative of the upper-class, the aristocrats are made to see the errors in their ways and perhaps change.

In conclusion, Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose the flaws in Victorian society and inflict social responsibility on to the upper-classes.
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fatheha123
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#63
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#63
Anyone know what might come up for Romeo and J, inspector calls and jekyll and hyde?
Im aimed a grade 6 but I want to get a 7 at least but i think im just getting ahead of myself :confused:
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ellxee
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#64
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#64
look on youtube at Mr Salles or Mr Duff also if you google collins revision cards there’s loads to print off they helped me a lot
(Original post by akram03)
Any good revision resources?
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abbie.wagstaff
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#65
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#65
Please can someone read my short story on m recent post.... much appreciated my fellow year 11s
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Littlegeekgirl_
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#66
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Is anyone doing Romeo and Juliet and A Christmas Carol?
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Zoeyyyyyyyy
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(Original post by fatheha123)
Anyone know what might come up for Romeo and J, inspector calls and jekyll and hyde?
Im aimed a grade 6 but I want to get a 7 at least but i think im just getting ahead of myself :confused:
Your not......you must be aware of ur capabilities...
Anyways GOOD LUCK
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Zoeyyyyyyyy
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#68
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(Original post by littlegeekgirl_)
is anyone doing romeo and juliet and a christmas carol?
doing a christmas carol
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abbie.wagstaff
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#69
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yeah im doing both and an inspector calls too
(Original post by Zoeyyyyyyyy)
doing a christmas carol
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Vetrix42
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#70
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#70
Can someone mark my A Christmas Carol work above.
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Zoeyyyyyyyy
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#71
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(Original post by abbie.wagstaff)
yeah im doing both and an inspector calls too
what do you think the ACC question is gonna be on?
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abbie.wagstaff
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#72
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#72
maybe responsibility? or something like about reflection? thats what my tutor thought anyway.
also could you read my recent post on english creative writing and tell me what you think of it
(Original post by Zoeyyyyyyyy)
what do you think the ACC question is gonna be on?
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Zoeyyyyyyyy
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(Original post by Vetrix42)
Can someone mark this. It is out of 30.

The Question is how Dickens writes about the Cratchit family and their importance in the novel.

In the 5-Act Novella, Dickens uses the Cratchit family to metaphorically represent the plight of the Victorian poor. Dickens uses them to expose the myths about the poor and inflict social responsibility on the upper-class.

In Stave 1, Bob Cratchit is confined to a 'dismal little cell'. The adjective 'dismal' connotes to a gloomy and sombre atmosphere that Bob is forced to work in. Alternatively, it could represent the repetitive long-hour shifts - accustomed to Victorian men and children. Contextually, it gives insight to the attitudes of Dickens towards working-conditions, who experienced this in a factory as a child. Combined with "little, suggests that he is trapped and perhaps abused by the legislation put in place by 'guilty governments'. This is reinforced by "cell", which denotes that Bob is trapped he is a victim/prisoner of capitalism and the insatiable lust for wealth by the social-elite. Perhaps, it exposes how the aristocrats saw their rights of their social inferior as unimportant. The contemporary aristocratic reader is made to critically evaluate their actions and perhaps they are inflicted with guilt by Dickens' moral messages. Dickens uses Bob to draw attention to the flaw in the 1834 Poor Law, and how it gave industrialists immense power which widened the gap between the wealthy and the unfortunate. As exemplified by Bob's "smaller fire". Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose the flaws of Victorian society and call for change.

Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose how material wealth is transient and less valuable in respect to relationships, as exemplified by the recurrent theme of family when Bob "carried Tiny Tim upon his shoulders". The strenuous verb indicates Bob's complete devotion to his children as exemplified in Stave 4 when he "praised the industry ... of Mrs Cratchit and the girls". His love is unconditional as alternatively "carried" implies Tiny Tim is a burden upon his family, a financial strain as there were little laws regarding disability; irregardless Bob and his family's overwhelming love despite having little materially are willing to accept this burden. The reader feels admiration to Bob and are inflicted with social responsibility, as Dickens believed that if the wealthy helped the poor society would prosper.

In Stave 2, Bob Cratchit calls his wife "precious", which denotes to valuable, priceless, however, this is not in a material sense but abstractly, as she is "full of comfort". In a socity gripped by industrialism and capitalism Dickens intentionally structure's Bob's register always to be very "cheerful" and speak "pleasantly" regardless of class. Through his character, Dickens is giving the reader an example of how to act towards one another regardless of class, causing the reader to admire him.

Bob's unwavering love is depicted in Stave 4 when he weeps for his son exclaiming, "My little, little child!". The adjective "little" is repeated adumbrating that Bob is overwhelmed with grief despite Tiny Tim being a burden. Additionally, "little" denotes to innocent, unprotected but more implicitly it highlights the untimely nature of his death in regards to age. Alternatively, Tiny Tim is a victim of capitalism. Dickens' structures his novella to have Tiny Tim's death to be witnessed by Scrooge in order to instigate change within society, as Scrooge is a metaphor for the rich. Scrooge is partially responsibly as he pays Bob poorly, something which was uniform in Victorian society. Scrooge deliberately is made to see his death to see the effects of his own actions upon the less fortunate, hence linking to the theme of responsibility. As a representative of the upper-class, the aristocrats are made to see the errors in their ways and perhaps change.

In conclusion, Dickens uses the Cratchit family to expose the flaws in Victorian society and inflict social responsibility on to the upper-classes.
The essay includes some very perceptive ideas....the only thing i would say is that the exam question is on the cratchits family....you can write about the other children too and mrs cratchits perspective on scrooge(etc.) Well done though I would honestly give this 25/25+ marks.....if you wrote a little more.
PS....praying this q actually comes up
Last edited by Zoeyyyyyyyy; 3 weeks ago
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Laurenevans1234
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#74
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Yeah
(Original post by Littlegeekgirl_)
Is anyone doing Romeo and Juliet and A Christmas Carol?
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Anthos
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#75
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(Original post by Zoeyyyyyyyy)
The essay includes some very perceptive ideas....the only thing i would say is that the exam question is on the cratchits family....you can write about the other children too and mrs cratchits perspective on scrooge(etc.) Well done though I would honestly give this 25/25+ marks.....if you wrote a little more.
PS....praying this q actually comes up
I don't think it will - the Cratchits came up in the 2017 paper.
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fatheha123
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(Original post by Laurenevans1234)
Yeah
Have you got any resources for R & J please?
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Zoeyyyyyyyy
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(Original post by Anthos)
I don't think it will - the Cratchits came up in the 2017 paper.
Thanks for letting me know
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fatheha123
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#78
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(Original post by Zoeyyyyyyyy)
Your not......you must be aware of ur capabilities...
Anyways GOOD LUCK
Thank youu :o:H:thumbsup:
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m2b
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#79
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Macbeth and The Sign of Four?
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m2b
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#80
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[QUOTE=gxbbv;82818738]does anyone here do the sign of four, Macbeth, an inspector calls or love and relationships I'm so bad at eng lit uhhhhh[/QUO
(Original post by gxbbv)
does anyone here do the sign of four, Macbeth, an inspector calls or love and relationships I'm so bad at eng lit uhhhhh
Never in my life have I met someone from outside my skl that studies Sign of Four wow
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