Edexcel GCSE English language (1EN0) - Paper 1 Fiction & Imaginative - 4 June, 2019

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Tolgarda
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This is a chat thread for Edexcel's GCSE English language Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing.

I thought that I would create the exam thread for this one since I did it last year. I scored 59/64 on this paper (with full marks for my imaginative writing). If any of you would like help from me, a simple DM will suffice.

The exam will take place on Tuesday, 4 June 2019.

Discussion for paper two: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5953312


General advice:
Spoiler:
Show










    • Your entire GCSE English language qualification is weighted on exams: paper 1 is worth 40%; paper 2 is worth 60% (equal weighting on reading and writing). The key is to not feel fazed by the pressure, that is where the battle is won and lost for students in exams (or so I've been told). I feel like essay-based exams are like games - games have rules, and if you play by those rules - you can win. You don't get marks for writing something that you feel might be good. You get marks for allowing the examiner to tick boxes that fulfil the criteria set out in the mark-scheme. With this in mind, I advise you to look at the mark-schemes and be au fait with them so that your answers take maximum advantage of them in the exam. Read the examiner reports for model answers so that you have a template for your own answers to be predicated in the exam (although there is a caveat to this). They also contain examiner feedback and examiner tips as well.
    • Keep an eye on the time. Some students may find themselves in a battle against the clock. Ensure that your last sentence is a finished one and that you have attempted all the high-tariff questions to a reasonable standard with a good degree of effort. You don't want your ability to be judged on whether you can time manage, do you? Don't let this be a deciding factor!
    • Have the right mentality for exams. Don’t be euphoric if you see a question that you like or get the impression that it is 'easy', for it can lead you to bleed unnecessary marks from petty blunders that are easily preventable; however, don’t be too petrified if you can’t understand the excerpt or the question either, for that is even worse and sets you on the course for failure. I wouldn't approach with an attitude that is too optimistic, or too pessimistic. Just stay concentrated and focus on the topic at hand, then you will be in the driver's seat on the road to success
    • Don’t worry about SPaG for the reading section. SPaG is only tested in the writing section, and only accounts for 20% of the overall mark (32 marks out of a total 160). Just focus on the substance of your analysis.
    • Practice makes perfect; procrastination makes pandemonium. You should be acquainted with exam conditions when you sit these things. Hone your close-reading analysis by identifying language and structure techniques of 19th-century fiction. ALWAYS ASK YOUR TEACHER TO MARK YOUR PRACTICE PAPERS AND PROVIDE CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK FOR YOU TO IMPROVE!
    • Remember: 'in omnia paratus.' I can't predict what will come up, neither should you (one of my teachers was shocked when they found out that any 19th-century literature that wasn't English or American appeared last year). The extracts should be unseen so that it is your close-reading being assessed, therefore the excerpts will be derived from obscure sources. Just be prepared for anything and everything. Remember that you are sitting an untiered paper, so it is unlikely that you'll find the excerpt unaccessible unless you're not at the standard of a grade 4 student, which you should aspire to be and exceed.
    • During the exam, make sure your answers are fully focused on the question, that you are concentrating at all times and that you re-check your work if you have time at the end.




Paper-specific advice (from what I was taught, other methods of answering questions are also valid and may be better for you):

Spoiler:
Show







General advice on the paper

  • This paper assesses your ability to analyse 19th-century fiction and write creative and imaginative prose. The maximum mark available for this paper is 64 and lasts for one and three-quarter hours. It is worth 40% of the qualification. This paper is based on a fixed rubric, so the questions will only change slightly depending on the excerpt.


  • The margin for error isn't too thin on this paper, so don't worry! If you feel that you've done poorly on this paper, don't feel crestfallen - you may have lost the battle, but by no means the war! I remember feeling crushed after this paper last year, but it isn't worth it!


  • It is practically impossible for excerpts from the following novels to appear in this paper: The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, The Mortal Immortal by Mary Shelly, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe - this is because they’ve been previously used in SAMs or live assessments. You will also probably never see an excerpt from any of the novels offered on Edexcel's GCSE English literature course as well. Texts from any point during the 19th century can appear, and from anywhere across the globe as well.

Advice when answering the questions in this paper
  • DONT SPEND TOO MUCH TIME ON QUESTIONS 1 AND 2! Do not spend any more than four minutes on the first two questions of this paper. They are low-tariff questions only worth a total of three marks. They are not worth the time and effort you might devote to them. They target explicit and implicit information regarding a specific area within the text (AO1), so it’s very easy to overthink these questions. Do not have any fear if you can’t answer these ones because this is the only part of the paper that assesses these skills. You want to have enough time to demonstrate your proficiency in more important skills that are outlined in the specification.


  • ONLY TWO PARAGRAPHS FOR QUESTION 3! You’ll want to do one paragraph for literary devices and another for structural features in this question. Each paragraph should theoretically be worth three marks. Both paragraphs use the same formula to plug your ideas in: mention the literary device/structural feature used by the writer, explain its connotations, and finally explain the effects of these connotations on the reader. This question only targets a certain area of the text, so do not use any evidence or write about anything outside of the specific segment of the text given in the question. Ensure that you write a paragraph for both language and structure, for writing only one or the other caps you at two marks regardless of the quality of your analysis.


  • DO NOT ARGUE THAT THE WRITER IS UNSUCCESSFUL IN QUESTION 4! Yes, technically you can, but it is much easier to agree, and ask yourself, why would the text be worthy of analysis if it was unsuccessful? Here are some other crucial tips for this question:

  • Avoid talking about language or structural features (remember, you're here to evaluate the theme or aspect of the text proposed by the statement). This question is pure AO4. I think you would have had enough time to cover language and structue in the previous question.
  • Discuss the setting, ideas, themes, events (Edexcel actually put this in the mark-scheme). You may affectionately refer to this method of answering with the acronym SITE. When evaluating the text, I recommend expanding on these aspects. Does the scenery of the text affect the mood, or relate in any way to the statement? What ideas are the characters based on that may link with the statement? Is there a certain theme prevalent throughout the text that feeds into the statement, or is there a crucial event that highlights what the statement is suggesting?
  • Always eulogise the writer at the beginning of each of your paragraphs and briefly explain the element of SITE you are using before you expound on it. Vary the vocabulary in your praise to avoid making each paragraph beginning banal and irritating to the examiner (e.g. exemplary notion, excellent idea, exceptional, ingenious implementation, brilliant, impressive inclusion, cleverly crafted etc.).
  • Aim for about three-four paragraphs. You can still gain full marks with three paragraphs. but they require a great degree of depth to them. I always used three detailed paragraphs and omitted the element of SITE that I didn't feel was relevant to the question (usually the 'setting' element).

  • PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS IN THE WRITING SECTION! You will always be given a choice of two questions to chose from (question 5/6 in this paper). Personally, I enjoy the narrative route much more because the question will always be very relatable and something along the lines of your question has probably occurred to you before. If you are able to write about a real event in your life, you’ll find it to be a comfortable, and possibly enjoyable, experience. However, if you are more content with descriptive writing, then you can choose that choice (although there is a possibility that it might not come, in which case you could be stuffed, unlike the narrative route). Edexcel have exemplar material of the highest standard for narrative writing. However, try to avoid producing imaginative writing that is based on a template from model answers because this is dull and displays a lack of creativity. It's like using your stabilisers to ride a bike - it looks very amateurish.





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(Original post by Tolgarda)
This is a chat thread for Edexcel's GCSE English language Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing.

I thought that I would create the exam thread for this one since I did it last year. I scored 59/64 on this paper (with full marks for my imaginative writing). If any of you would like help from me, a simple DM will suffice.

The exam will take place on Tuesday, 4 June 2019.


General advice:
Spoiler:
Show










    • Your entire GCSE English language qualification is weighted on exams: paper 1 is worth 40%; paper 2 is worth 60% (equal weighting on reading and writing). The key is to not feel fazed by the pressure, that is where the battle is won and lost for students in exams (or so I've been told). I feel like essay-based exams are like games - games have rules, and if you play by those rules - you can win. You don't get marks for writing something that you feel might be good. You get marks for allowing the examiner to tick boxes that fulfil the criteria set out in the mark-scheme. With this in mind, I advise you to look at the mark-schemes and be au fait with them so that your answers take maximum advantage of them in the exam. Read the examiner reports for model answers so that you have a template for your own answers to be predicated in the exam (although there is a caveat to this). They also contain examiner feedback and examiner tips as well.
    • Keep an eye on the time. Some students may find themselves in a battle against the clock. Ensure that your last sentence is a finished one and that you have attempted all the high-tariff questions to a reasonable standard with a good degree of effort. You don't want your ability to be judged on whether you can time manage, do you? Don't let this be a deciding factor!
    • Have the right mentality for exams. Don’t be euphoric if you see a question that you like or get the impression that it is 'easy', for it can lead you to bleed unnecessary marks from petty blunders that are easily preventable; however, don’t be too petrified if you can’t understand the excerpt or the question either, for that is even worse and sets you on the course for failure. I wouldn't approach with an attitude that is too optimistic, or too pessimistic. Just stay concentrated and focus on the topic at hand, then you will be in the driver's seat on the road to success
    • Don’t worry about SPaG for the reading section. SPaG is only tested in the writing section, and only accounts for 20% of the overall mark (32 marks out of a total 160). Just focus on the substance of your analysis.
    • Practice makes perfect; procrastination makes pandemonium. You should be acquainted with exam conditions when you sit these things. Hone your close-reading analysis by identifying language and structure techniques of 19th-century fiction. ALWAYS ASK YOUR TEACHER TO MARK YOUR PRACTICE PAPERS AND PROVIDE CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK FOR YOU TO IMPROVE!
    • Remember: 'in omnia paratus.' I can't predict what will come up, neither should you (one of my teachers was shocked when they found out that any 19th-century literature that wasn't English or American appeared last year). The extracts should be unseen so that it is your close-reading being assessed, therefore the excerpts will be derived from obscure sources. Just be prepared for anything and everything. Remember that you are sitting an untiered paper, so it is unlikely that you'll find the excerpt unaccessible unless you're not at the standard of a grade 4 student, which you should aspire to be and exceed.
    • During the exam, make sure your answers are fully focused on the question, that you are concentrating at all times and that you re-check your work if you have time at the end.




Paper-specific advice (from what I was taught, other methods of answering questions are also valid and may be better for you):

Spoiler:
Show







General advice on the paper

  • This paper assesses your ability to analyse 19th-century fiction and write creative and imaginative prose. The maximum mark available for this paper is 64 and lasts for one and three-quarter hours. It is worth 40% of the qualification. This paper is based on a fixed rubric, so the questions will only change slightly depending on the excerpt.


  • The margin for error isn't too thin on this paper, so don't worry! If you feel that you've done poorly on this paper, don't feel crestfallen - you may have lost the battle, but by no means the war! I remember feeling crushed after this paper last year, but it isn't worth it!


  • It is practically impossible for excerpts from the following novels to appear in this paper: The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, The Mortal Immortal by Mary Shelly, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe - this is because they’ve been previously used in SAMs or live assessments. You will also probably never see an excerpt from any of the novels offered on Edexcel's GCSE English literature course as well. Texts from any point during the 19th century can appear, and from anywhere across the globe as well.

Advice when answering the questions in this paper
  • DONT SPEND TOO MUCH TIME ON QUESTIONS 1 AND 2! Do not spend any more than four minutes on the first two questions of this paper. They are low-tariff questions only worth a total of three marks. They are not worth the time and effort you might devote to them. They target explicit and implicit information regarding a specific area within the text (AO1), so it’s very easy to overthink these questions. Do not have any fear if you can’t answer these ones because this is the only part of the paper that assesses these skills. You want to have enough time to demonstrate your proficiency in more important skills that are outlined in the specification.


  • ONLY TWO PARAGRAPHS FOR QUESTION 3! You’ll want to do one paragraph for literary devices and another for structural features in this question. Each paragraph should theoretically be worth three marks. Both paragraphs use the same formula to plug your ideas in: mention the literary device/structural feature used by the writer, explain its connotations, and finally explain the effects of these connotations on the reader. This question only targets a certain area of the text, so do not use any evidence or write about anything outside of the specific segment of the text given in the question. Ensure that you write a paragraph for both language and structure, for writing only one or the other caps you at two marks regardless of the quality of your analysis.


  • DO NOT ARGUE THAT THE WRITER IS UNSUCCESSFUL IN QUESTION 4! Yes, technically you can, but it is much easier to agree, and ask yourself, why would the text be worthy of analysis if it was unsuccessful? Here are some other crucial tips for this question:

  • Avoid talking about language or structural features (remember, you're here to evaluate the theme or aspect of the text proposed by the statement). This question is pure AO4. I think you would have had enough time to cover language and structue in the previous question.
  • Discuss the setting, ideas, themes, events (Edexcel actually put this in the mark-scheme). You may affectionately refer to this method of answering with the acronym SITE. When evaluating the text, I recommend expanding on these aspects. Does the scenery of the text affect the mood, or relate in any way to the statement? What ideas are the characters based on that may link with the statement? Is there a certain theme prevalent throughout the text that feeds into the statement, or is there a crucial event that highlights what the statement is suggesting?
  • Always eulogise the writer at the beginning of each of your paragraphs and briefly explain the element of SITE you are using before you expound on it. Vary the vocabulary in your praise to avoid making each paragraph beginning banal and irritating to the examiner (e.g. exemplary notion, excellent idea, exceptional, ingenious implementation, brilliant, impressive inclusion, cleverly crafted etc.).
  • Aim for about three-four paragraphs. You can still gain full marks with three paragraphs. but they require a great degree of depth to them. I always used three detailed paragraphs and omitted the element of SITE that I didn't feel was relevant to the question (usually the 'setting' element).

  • PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS IN THE WRITING SECTION! You will always be given a choice of two questions to chose from (question 5/6 in this paper). Personally, I enjoy the narrative route much more because the question will always be very relatable and something along the lines of your question has probably occurred to you before. If you are able to write about a real event in your life, you’ll find it to be a comfortable, and possibly enjoyable, experience. However, if you are more content with descriptive writing, then you can choose that choice (although there is a possibility that it might not come, in which case you could be stuffed, unlike the narrative route). Edexcel have exemplar material of the highest standard for narrative writing. However, try to avoid producing imaginative writing that is based on a template from model answers because this is dull and displays a lack of creativity. It's like using your stabilisers to ride a bike - it looks very amateurish.





Nice idea, I'm sure lots of people will benefit
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by thestudent33)
Nice idea, I'm sure lots of people will benefit
Hopefully, Evil Homer still hasn't added it to the list yet, which is unfortunate. I hope he does soon though.
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username3973192
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Hopefully, Evil Homer still hasn't added it to the list yet, which is unfortunate. I hope he does soon though.
Lol, it took a while for him to add my threads too. But I'm sure he's busy with other TSR issues.
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Evil Homer
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Hopefully, Evil Homer still hasn't added it to the list yet, which is unfortunate. I hope he does soon though.
Hey That's all done for you

Good luck with your exams!
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I’m actually panicking
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(Original post by Studenty11)
I’m actually panicking
That is pointless because it can negatively affect you and it doesn't breed anything useful unless you perform better under stress, in my opinion. Stay strong. This exam isn't until June anyway, so you have time.
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That is pointless because it can negatively affect you and it doesn't breed anything useful unless you perform better under stress, in my opinion. Stay strong. This exam isn't until June anyway, so you have time.
Thanks, my exams start in may though
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Thanks, my exams start in may though
I know, but this isn't one you should be panicking about.
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I know, but this isn't one you should be panicking about.
Hmm yeah true
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Hiiiii how are people who are aiming for 8/9 revising for maths and science
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I’m actually panicking
It's natural to feel a little daunted! The sooner you start revising effectively, the sooner you'll start to feel more in control. If there is a particular question bothering you try to make sure you allot enough time to it. Best of luck!
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I'm going to have a breakdown i need to pass english language and get a B to do economics !!!!!!!!! how do you answer the persuasive question on paper 2 :/
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I'm going to have a breakdown i need to pass english language and get a B to do economics !!!!!!!!! how do you answer the persuasive question on paper 2 :/
Omg me too I have no idea I can’t even persuade my own self to revise lol
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I'm going to have a breakdown i need to pass english language and get a B to do economics !!!!!!!!! how do you answer the persuasive question on paper 2 :/
There is not just one way to answer this, but a multitude of ways. I intend to cover these things in my thread for paper two.
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Hi,
I naturally feel daunted to do imaginative writing I dunoo but cannot help my feelings. How do I become good at imaginative writing task? Do I need to read books everyday to advance my vocabulary?
I am looking forward for help as much as possible for the gcse English language Edexcel exam.
(Original post by Tolgarda)
This is a chat thread for Edexcel's GCSE English language Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing.

I thought that I would create the exam thread for this one since I did it last year. I scored 59/64 on this paper (with full marks for my imaginative writing). If any of you would like help from me, a simple DM will suffice.

The exam will take place on Tuesday, 4 June 2019.


General advice:
Spoiler:
Show










    • Your entire GCSE English language qualification is weighted on exams: paper 1 is worth 40%; paper 2 is worth 60% (equal weighting on reading and writing). The key is to not feel fazed by the pressure, that is where the battle is won and lost for students in exams (or so I've been told). I feel like essay-based exams are like games - games have rules, and if you play by those rules - you can win. You don't get marks for writing something that you feel might be good. You get marks for allowing the examiner to tick boxes that fulfil the criteria set out in the mark-scheme. With this in mind, I advise you to look at the mark-schemes and be au fait with them so that your answers take maximum advantage of them in the exam. Read the examiner reports for model answers so that you have a template for your own answers to be predicated in the exam (although there is a caveat to this). They also contain examiner feedback and examiner tips as well.
    • Keep an eye on the time. Some students may find themselves in a battle against the clock. Ensure that your last sentence is a finished one and that you have attempted all the high-tariff questions to a reasonable standard with a good degree of effort. You don't want your ability to be judged on whether you can time manage, do you? Don't let this be a deciding factor!
    • Have the right mentality for exams. Don’t be euphoric if you see a question that you like or get the impression that it is 'easy', for it can lead you to bleed unnecessary marks from petty blunders that are easily preventable; however, don’t be too petrified if you can’t understand the excerpt or the question either, for that is even worse and sets you on the course for failure. I wouldn't approach with an attitude that is too optimistic, or too pessimistic. Just stay concentrated and focus on the topic at hand, then you will be in the driver's seat on the road to success
    • Don’t worry about SPaG for the reading section. SPaG is only tested in the writing section, and only accounts for 20% of the overall mark (32 marks out of a total 160). Just focus on the substance of your analysis.
    • Practice makes perfect; procrastination makes pandemonium. You should be acquainted with exam conditions when you sit these things. Hone your close-reading analysis by identifying language and structure techniques of 19th-century fiction. ALWAYS ASK YOUR TEACHER TO MARK YOUR PRACTICE PAPERS AND PROVIDE CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK FOR YOU TO IMPROVE!
    • Remember: 'in omnia paratus.' I can't predict what will come up, neither should you (one of my teachers was shocked when they found out that any 19th-century literature that wasn't English or American appeared last year). The extracts should be unseen so that it is your close-reading being assessed, therefore the excerpts will be derived from obscure sources. Just be prepared for anything and everything. Remember that you are sitting an untiered paper, so it is unlikely that you'll find the excerpt unaccessible unless you're not at the standard of a grade 4 student, which you should aspire to be and exceed.
    • During the exam, make sure your answers are fully focused on the question, that you are concentrating at all times and that you re-check your work if you have time at the end.




Paper-specific advice (from what I was taught, other methods of answering questions are also valid and may be better for you):

Spoiler:
Show







General advice on the paper

  • This paper assesses your ability to analyse 19th-century fiction and write creative and imaginative prose. The maximum mark available for this paper is 64 and lasts for one and three-quarter hours. It is worth 40% of the qualification. This paper is based on a fixed rubric, so the questions will only change slightly depending on the excerpt.


  • The margin for error isn't too thin on this paper, so don't worry! If you feel that you've done poorly on this paper, don't feel crestfallen - you may have lost the battle, but by no means the war! I remember feeling crushed after this paper last year, but it isn't worth it!


  • It is practically impossible for excerpts from the following novels to appear in this paper: The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, The Mortal Immortal by Mary Shelly, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe - this is because they’ve been previously used in SAMs or live assessments. You will also probably never see an excerpt from any of the novels offered on Edexcel's GCSE English literature course as well. Texts from any point during the 19th century can appear, and from anywhere across the globe as well.

Advice when answering the questions in this paper
  • DONT SPEND TOO MUCH TIME ON QUESTIONS 1 AND 2! Do not spend any more than four minutes on the first two questions of this paper. They are low-tariff questions only worth a total of three marks. They are not worth the time and effort you might devote to them. They target explicit and implicit information regarding a specific area within the text (AO1), so it’s very easy to overthink these questions. Do not have any fear if you can’t answer these ones because this is the only part of the paper that assesses these skills. You want to have enough time to demonstrate your proficiency in more important skills that are outlined in the specification.


  • ONLY TWO PARAGRAPHS FOR QUESTION 3! You’ll want to do one paragraph for literary devices and another for structural features in this question. Each paragraph should theoretically be worth three marks. Both paragraphs use the same formula to plug your ideas in: mention the literary device/structural feature used by the writer, explain its connotations, and finally explain the effects of these connotations on the reader. This question only targets a certain area of the text, so do not use any evidence or write about anything outside of the specific segment of the text given in the question. Ensure that you write a paragraph for both language and structure, for writing only one or the other caps you at two marks regardless of the quality of your analysis.


  • DO NOT ARGUE THAT THE WRITER IS UNSUCCESSFUL IN QUESTION 4! Yes, technically you can, but it is much easier to agree, and ask yourself, why would the text be worthy of analysis if it was unsuccessful? Here are some other crucial tips for this question:

  • Avoid talking about language or structural features (remember, you're here to evaluate the theme or aspect of the text proposed by the statement). This question is pure AO4. I think you would have had enough time to cover language and structue in the previous question.
  • Discuss the setting, ideas, themes, events (Edexcel actually put this in the mark-scheme). You may affectionately refer to this method of answering with the acronym SITE. When evaluating the text, I recommend expanding on these aspects. Does the scenery of the text affect the mood, or relate in any way to the statement? What ideas are the characters based on that may link with the statement? Is there a certain theme prevalent throughout the text that feeds into the statement, or is there a crucial event that highlights what the statement is suggesting?
  • Always eulogise the writer at the beginning of each of your paragraphs and briefly explain the element of SITE you are using before you expound on it. Vary the vocabulary in your praise to avoid making each paragraph beginning banal and irritating to the examiner (e.g. exemplary notion, excellent idea, exceptional, ingenious implementation, brilliant, impressive inclusion, cleverly crafted etc.).
  • Aim for about three-four paragraphs. You can still gain full marks with three paragraphs. but they require a great degree of depth to them. I always used three detailed paragraphs and omitted the element of SITE that I didn't feel was relevant to the question (usually the 'setting' element).

  • PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS IN THE WRITING SECTION! You will always be given a choice of two questions to chose from (question 5/6 in this paper). Personally, I enjoy the narrative route much more because the question will always be very relatable and something along the lines of your question has probably occurred to you before. If you are able to write about a real event in your life, you’ll find it to be a comfortable, and possibly enjoyable, experience. However, if you are more content with descriptive writing, then you can choose that choice (although there is a possibility that it might not come, in which case you could be stuffed, unlike the narrative route). Edexcel have exemplar material of the highest standard for narrative writing. However, try to avoid producing imaginative writing that is based on a template from model answers because this is dull and displays a lack of creativity. It's like using your stabilisers to ride a bike - it looks very amateurish.





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angrybear247
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
There is not just one way to answer this, but a multitude of ways. I intend to cover these things in my thread for paper two.
thank you ! please link it when you make it
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(Original post by IsMo987)
Hiiiii how are people who are aiming for 8/9 revising for maths and science
yes
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How did you manage the timing for this exam? Did you spend 45 mins on the writing questions as recommended or did you do something different?
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by qb2507)
How did you manage the timing for this exam? Did you spend 45 mins on the writing questions as recommended or did you do something different?
I don't actually remember. I do think I rushed most of the writing section and went back to questions three and four at the end, but I definitely used a hell of a lot more on my time on the writing section. That's for sure.
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With HE fairs postponed, would a virtual HE fair be useful?

Yes (44)
60.27%
No (29)
39.73%

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