miniminx3310
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hiii there, just wondering if anyones applied + got accepted/had any tips for this...

/which gcses grades did u get
/whats the application process like- is it difficult??! (i'd expect it to be ahaha)
/what is the course like? - in terms of ideologies/current affairs- are u enjoying this
-do you like the way that it is taught/ how is it taught in large/small groups etc..
-in terms of lectures, what kind of quality are they (ive been to public ones before and they were amazing!!)
but dk abt private oneS?

as well in terms of accommodation/social life what is your opinion on this? -i've heard the more social halls are rosebery, carr-saunders + passfield but when I've googled them, they look really expensive ):::

whats london like to actually go out in?

(I live close so know roughly, but whats it like actually staying in central lnd)
Last edited by miniminx3310; 1 year ago
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LeapingLucy
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I'm a second year LSE student doing the Politics half of that course, though I do it with History rather than IR.

Do you have any specific questions about the course? 'What is it like' is pretty vague.
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miniminx3310
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^^ just updated it, hope this gives more clarity in what I'm asking...
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I'm a second year LSE student doing the Politics half of that course, though I do it with History rather than IR.

Do you have any specific questions about the course? 'What is it like' is pretty vague.
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LeapingLucy
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GCSEs: I got 10A*s (you definitely don't need 10A*s though)

The application process: it's not a difficult process. You just submit your UCAS application and wait - there are no interviews/supplementary essays. I've written a guide to writing a good personal statement for LSE here (it's the third post):
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5841890

The course: Regarding politics, in the first year, you take the two compulsory politics modules: Introduction to Political Science and Introduction to Political Theory. The latter is political philosophy - you study political theorists like Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Machiavelli, Fanon, Arendt etc.
You can read summaries of these two modules here and here:
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...2018_GV101.htm
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...2018_GV100.htm

After first year, you have complete free choice of politics modules (I'm not sure whether that's the same for IR). This is the list of modules available currently to give you an idea of the sorts of modules on offer:
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...ed-subheading6

The majority of the modules are political science - these tend to be rooted in different theories, e.g theories of voter behaviour or the policy cycle, and we use examples from current affairs to illustrate these points in discussions/essays. But the modules are definitely not centred around current affairs. I think there is a current-affairs focused first year IR module though.

The teaching: we have a one-hour lecture and a one-hour class a week for each module (we do 4 modules each year). The lecture introduces you to a topic, you go away and do the reading, and then you discuss the readings in the classes. The classes generally have 10-15 people in. It suits me perfectly - you will have people from all over the world in your classes, who can talk provide examples about e.g. political parties/public policies from their home countries.

Lectures: All my lecturers have been really good, but as I've only done 8 modules so far out of the 200+ available at LSE, I don't feel I'm in a position to speak for lectures at LSE as a whole. Generally though, my experience has been really positive.

Social life/halls: LSE social life in first year is centred around the four catered LSE halls: Rosebery, Bankside, Passfield and Carr-Saunders. If you're in any of those, I think you'll have a pretty standard British freshers' experience (i.e. predrinking with friends, nights out etc.). The other halls (intercollegiate & self-catered) are far less social.

If price is an issue, then Passfield and Carr-Saunders are your best bet. They offer 31 week contracts, where you move all your stuff out at Easter and Christmas so that tourists can rent your room, subsidising your rent. This lowers the price by about £2000, making it around £6000 for a single room (which is what you'd pay at somewhere like Warwick if you wanted an ensuite room - also bear in mind that you get a higher maintenance loan for being in London). If you need to cut costs further then you could consider a shared room - it will be about £4000 for a double room or £3000 for a triple room.
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