job centre said i can't stay on low benefit my whole life Watch

idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
Job centre said just because i got a disabling illness, i can't stay on low benefit (universal credit) my whole life as i am only 18. My advisor asked if i was in education or training and i said no. Its only been the second time that i went to the job centre. He said for me to think about whether i should go back to studying, do an apprenticeship or start full time work. I'm not sure what i should do, i can't study and i am not sure what i want to do in life. Should i just rush into a job then?
Last edited by idontkn; 1 week ago
0
reply
hello_shawn
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
What is your illness that stops you having a job/studying? Job centre might be blunt or harsh but their purpose is to find a job for you.
1
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by hello_shawn)
What is your illness that stops you having a job/studying? Job centre might be blunt or harsh but their purpose is to find a job for you.
Memory loss caused by constant migraines
0
reply
hello_shawn
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by idontkn)
Memory loss caused by constant migraines
Then they'll find you unskilled work. Work that needs no training, or just 10 minutes of it before you're expected to know what to do. 1) it's better than nothing and 2) you can put it on a CV
5
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
Your advisor is doing the right thing. If you follow their advice, in 20 years' time you'd be extremely appreciative of their words.
7
reply
sophia5892
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
You've said you can't study - do you think you could manage an apprenticeship?
If not, I'd give a job a try.

Whilst it's wrong for the job centre to tell you you *can't* be on benefits for the rest of your life, as for some disabled people there's sadly no other option... unless you're on ESA/declared not fit for work, then they won't keep paying you unless you are genuinely looking for work. So it's probably a good idea to try working and see what you can/can't manage with your condition - finding your limits might also then help inform you about potential future career options Plus, if you are able to work, you will be better off in the long run. Living off benefits isn't as easy and lucrative as some people think!
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by sophia5892)
You've said you can't study - do you think you could manage an apprenticeship?
If not, I'd give a job a try.

Whilst it's wrong for the job centre to tell you you *can't* be on benefits for the rest of your life, as for some disabled people there's sadly no other option... unless you're on ESA/declared not fit for work, then they won't keep paying you unless you are genuinely looking for work. So it's probably a good idea to try working and see what you can/can't manage with your condition - finding your limits might also then help inform you about potential future career options Plus, if you are able to work, you will be better off in the long run. Living off benefits isn't as easy and lucrative as some people think!
Apprenticeships still have exams and with my condition, i will find any sort of exam hard. There's a reason why i dropped out of A levels.
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by sophia5892)
You've said you can't study - do you think you could manage an apprenticeship?
If not, I'd give a job a try.

Whilst it's wrong for the job centre to tell you you *can't* be on benefits for the rest of your life, as for some disabled people there's sadly no other option... unless you're on ESA/declared not fit for work, then they won't keep paying you unless you are genuinely looking for work. So it's probably a good idea to try working and see what you can/can't manage with your condition - finding your limits might also then help inform you about potential future career options Plus, if you are able to work, you will be better off in the long run. Living off benefits isn't as easy and lucrative as some people think!
I am declared not fit for work so i dont understand why i still have to work
0
reply
sophia5892
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by idontkn)
Apprenticeships still have exams and with my condition, i will find any sort of exam hard. There's a reason why i dropped out of A levels.
in that case, perhaps trying work is the better option. There's certainly nothing stopping you returning to education later on
0
reply
sophia5892
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
Sorry I replied before seeing this! If you're declared not fit for work then no you shouldn't have to... is this declared not fit to work through a Work Capability Assessment or through medical evidence/a sick note etc.?

(Original post by idontkn)
I am declared not fit for work so i dont understand why i still have to work
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by sophia5892)
Sorry I replied before seeing this! If you're declared not fit for work then no you shouldn't have to... is this declared not fit to work through a Work Capability Assessment or through medical evidence/a sick note etc.?

(Original post by idontkn)
Sick note
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by idontkn)
Sick note
Are you waiting to go to a WCA?
0
reply
StriderHort
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
That's way things are now *shrug* If your never willing to get a job you won't be welcome at a job centre...

A decade or so back it was different, if you were unfit for work you got stuck on DLA for life, no repeat assessment, you just got sent a big cheque book every year....but then it turned around and they got pelters for basically letting people rot on the scrapheap and fall through the various cracks in the system. Spend 10-20 years off on the sick and you found it near impossible to get anyone to give you a chance if you changed yr mind.

So no, you don't get to just opt out of ever doing anything, it;s massively unhealthy. Lets face it, if we're declaring folk with terminal cancer and such fit for work, what chance do headaches have?
1
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by hello_shawn)
Then they'll find you unskilled work. Work that needs no training, or just 10 minutes of it before you're expected to know what to do. 1) it's better than nothing and 2) you can put it on a CV
How am i expected to know what to do if i can't remember?
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by StriderHort)
That's way things are now *shrug* If your never willing to get a job you won't be welcome at a job centre...

A decade or so back it was different, if you were unfit for work you got stuck on DLA for life, no repeat assessment, you just got sent a big cheque book every year....but then it turned around and they got pelters for basically letting people rot on the scrapheap and fall through the various cracks in the system. Spend 10-20 years off on the sick and you found it near impossible to get anyone to give you a chance if you changed yr mind.

So no, you don't get to just opt out of ever doing anything, it;s massively unhealthy. Lets face it, if we're declaring folk with terminal cancer and such fit for work, what chance do headaches have?
Well it actually affects intelligence and my ability to look for work. And isnt any issue with the brain the most dangerous? Some of my sentences dont make sense.
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by Pathway)
Are you waiting to go to a WCA?
No what that?
0
reply
sophia5892
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
I'm no expert when it comes to Universal Credit, but it's probably worth getting referred for a Work Capability Assessment. My understanding is that fit notes are more suited to temporary sickness/disability and that if you have a long-term condition you'll need a WCA and to be declared not fit for work by the DWP.

Unfortunately, as StriderHort says, this isn't an easy route, and plenty of people are refused so it is something you're likely to have to fight for. It could also be worth looking at PIP which can be paid in addition to other benefits. But again, be aware it could end up being a long process.
(I applied for PIP 6 months ago and I'm waiting for the outcome of my first "appeal", or Mandatory Reconsideration as it's called. Fully expecting to need to go to tribunal which could add another year or two to the claim time!)
(Original post by idontkn)
Sick note
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by idontkn)
No what that?
Read what sophia5892, you're technically still not unfit for work (long term) in the eyes of the DWP until you've been declared unfit for work post Work Capability Assessment.
0
reply
idontkn
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by sophia5892)
I'm no expert when it comes to Universal Credit, but it's probably worth getting referred for a Work Capability Assessment. My understanding is that fit notes are more suited to temporary sickness/disability and that if you have a long-term condition you'll need a WCA and to be declared not fit for work by the DWP.

Unfortunately, as StriderHort says, this isn't an easy route, and plenty of people are refused so it is something you're likely to have to fight for. It could also be worth looking at PIP which can be paid in addition to other benefits. But again, be aware it could end up being a long process.
(I applied for PIP 6 months ago and I'm waiting for the outcome of my first "appeal", or Mandatory Reconsideration as it's called. Fully expecting to need to go to tribunal which could add another year or two to the claim time!)
According to my stupid older sisters, migraines and Memory loss isnt a condition so she didnt put that down when helping me apply for universal credit. Later on she did though. She put down depression and russell-silver syndrome as the main reasons behind why i can't work.
0
reply
StriderHort
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by idontkn)
How am i expected to know what to do if i can't remember?
How do you remember to go to the jobcentre? Or how to communicate in English and fill in THEIR forms? Honest Q, as that's how an adviser will look at it. "If you can remember when and how to claim benefits why can't you remember how to work?"

You've said it's a sick note, that implies it's temporary and you will absolutely still be expected to aim toward reentering the workforce/study, you aren't allowed to just say no and keep claiming, there has to be progress of some sort.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (502)
37.74%
No - but I will (102)
7.67%
No - I don't want to (91)
6.84%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (635)
47.74%

Watched Threads

View All