WinterFalls
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I am in my second year of A-levels and I am doing French. Some German students are at my school for a few months. They are in year 11 and my A2 French lessons.
My teacher is very opinionated and in September, told me that some students from Germany would be joining the class. She suggested that it would be a good experience and better to see some new faces as I am the only one in my sixth form doing A2 French. They were put in year 11 because of their age, but aren’t staying long enough to complete any GCSE exams.
My teacher is French, having moved to Britain shortly after university. She is married to a British man. Throughout the year she has been talking about Brexit (naturally) and has been giving her opinion about how Britain will be worse off. She says that Britain doesn’t export anything noteworthy to the EU and it will be detrimental to poor areas that are developed because of the EU.
A while ago she told us to prepare presentations on the political systems and parties in our respective countries. I completed mine and my teacher said it was wrong, corrected me and that I should know this because I am British. I was angry because many people do not even bother to research and told her that if she knows it so well (she’s also a British-French dual national) then why doesn’t she do it. She shouted at me and said that it’s people like us (sixth formers who are already 18) who will have to vote.
I follow Brexit regularly and we talk about it in our lessons, however my teacher continues her speeches on how the UK is in crisis and my generation will need to sort it out. She directs her anti-Brexit jibes at me as I am the only British student in the class and favours the German students over me.
The German students in my class completed their presentations on the Bundestag (parliament) and the major political parties. This isn’t relevant to A-level French. My teacher also gave us a few sheets on the political parties in France and how Macron became president, but did not go into much detail. The text was in English and was complex so I had to look up some words.
Yesterday we were reading a text in the past historic (used in historical texts and educational newspapers) and I answered the questions wrong. The questions said to answer in French so I answered in French but not in full sentences. This is fine in some aspects of the exam. However, my French teacher shouted at me and told me to read it again as I didn’t fully understand the text (it was an extract from Claude Gueux by Victor Hugo). I eventually got to the answer but she kept on shouting at me because my tense was wrong when I was speaking (I used present instead of imperfect) as I was shaken up by her shouting. I told her that I didn’t know the answer and she continued to tell me that my tense was wrong, rather than explaining it. I understand we are supposed to figure things out ourselves, but this text was difficult. My teacher only shouted at me and did not criticise the German students when they got something wrong.
There are also words in French that I can’t find an English equivalent for on the spot, such as impérieux. My teacher says I’m the English expert in the class, (despite her living in England longer than I have been alive) and I should know everything about English.
She told us to complete some A-level exercises and marked them using GCSE criteria as she thought the questions did not have enough content to write about, despite the A-level book having fewer exercises, but being marked as A-level work.
The German students have to use an online dictionary to say specific words in English and one of them doesn’t speak English well. It takes them a while to complete some exercises. They did GCSE mocks and got 5s and 4s in French. My teacher tells them the differences between A-level skills from GCSE skills so I’m wondering why they were placed in an A-level class if they don’t even intend to sit the GCSE. We have wasted so much time on the differences between German, French and British cultures and languages that I’m not sure if there’s much point in turning up to her lessons if I can do the work in half the time.

Does anyone have any advice?

Thanks!
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DrawTheLine
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Report 8 months ago
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(Original post by WinterFalls)
I am in my second year of A-levels and I am doing French. Some German students are at my school for a few months. They are in year 11 and my A2 French lessons.
My teacher is very opinionated and in September, told me that some students from Germany would be joining the class. She suggested that it would be a good experience and better to see some new faces as I am the only one in my sixth form doing A2 French. They were put in year 11 because of their age, but aren’t staying long enough to complete any GCSE exams.
My teacher is French, having moved to Britain shortly after university. She is married to a British man. Throughout the year she has been talking about Brexit (naturally) and has been giving her opinion about how Britain will be worse off. She says that Britain doesn’t export anything noteworthy to the EU and it will be detrimental to poor areas that are developed because of the EU.
A while ago she told us to prepare presentations on the political systems and parties in our respective countries. I completed mine and my teacher said it was wrong, corrected me and that I should know this because I am British. I was angry because many people do not even bother to research and told her that if she knows it so well (she’s also a British-French dual national) then why doesn’t she do it. She shouted at me and said that it’s people like us (sixth formers who are already 18) who will have to vote.
I follow Brexit regularly and we talk about it in our lessons, however my teacher continues her speeches on how the UK is in crisis and my generation will need to sort it out. She directs her anti-Brexit jibes at me as I am the only British student in the class and favours the German students over me.
The German students in my class completed their presentations on the Bundestag (parliament) and the major political parties. This isn’t relevant to A-level French. My teacher also gave us a few sheets on the political parties in France and how Macron became president, but did not go into much detail. The text was in English and was complex so I had to look up some words.
Yesterday we were reading a text in the past historic (used in historical texts and educational newspapers) and I answered the questions wrong. The questions said to answer in French so I answered in French but not in full sentences. This is fine in some aspects of the exam. However, my French teacher shouted at me and told me to read it again as I didn’t fully understand the text (it was an extract from Claude Gueux by Victor Hugo). I eventually got to the answer but she kept on shouting at me because my tense was wrong when I was speaking (I used present instead of imperfect) as I was shaken up by her shouting. I told her that I didn’t know the answer and she continued to tell me that my tense was wrong, rather than explaining it. I understand we are supposed to figure things out ourselves, but this text was difficult. My teacher only shouted at me and did not criticise the German students when they got something wrong.
There are also words in French that I can’t find an English equivalent for on the spot, such as impérieux. My teacher says I’m the English expert in the class, (despite her living in England longer than I have been alive) and I should know everything about English.
She told us to complete some A-level exercises and marked them using GCSE criteria as she thought the questions did not have enough content to write about, despite the A-level book having fewer exercises, but being marked as A-level work.
The German students have to use an online dictionary to say specific words in English and one of them doesn’t speak English well. It takes them a while to complete some exercises. They did GCSE mocks and got 5s and 4s in French. My teacher tells them the differences between A-level skills from GCSE skills so I’m wondering why they were placed in an A-level class if they don’t even intend to sit the GCSE. We have wasted so much time on the differences between German, French and British cultures and languages that I’m not sure if there’s much point in turning up to her lessons if I can do the work in half the time.

Does anyone have any advice?

Thanks!
Speak to the head of department or your head of year about her. Make a record of all the times you think she's acted inappropriately. See if they can do anything for you
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