What would cause the U.K to split?

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Mr.McRat
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Like what would make Wales, England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland just split into different countries?
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HoldThisL
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England and Wales aren't likely to split because there's far less division as there is with Scotland.

Northern Ireland need England's tax money so that won't happen.

Scotland might split over a major political difference, like leaving without a deal.
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Mr.McRat
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Thank you. For explaining
(Original post by HoldThisL)
England and Wales aren't likely to split because there's far less division as there is with Scotland.

Northern Ireland need England's tax money so that won't happen.

Scotland might split over a major political difference, like leaving without a deal.
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HoldThisL
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(Original post by Mr.McRat)
Thank you. For explaining
You're. Welcome.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by HoldThisL)
England and Wales aren't likely to split because there's far less division as there is with Scotland.

Northern Ireland need England's tax money so that won't happen.

Scotland might split over a major political difference, like leaving without a deal.
I think that you might find Scotland are pretty reliant on English tax money too, even if there's another referendum there I wouldn't put any money on it being a yes vote.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Mr.McRat)
Like what would make Wales, England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland just split into different countries?
I think hold this gave a pretty good description. Scottish referendum I dont see happening for a long time. If Brexit goes wrong then I can see them wanting out.

N Ireland will go when its ready. Dont see Wales bothering. Not sure it has any gripes with England.
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Nalk1573
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When people ask the question "what is a British person" - this country will split.

Thankfully no one asks this question.
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HoldThisL
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(Original post by ColinDent)
I think that you might find Scotland are pretty reliant on English tax money too, even if there's another referendum there I wouldn't put any money on it being a yes vote.
Oh yeah definitely but given the 45% yes vote in [whenever it was] I find it hard to ignore
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ColinDent
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(Original post by HoldThisL)
Oh yeah definitely but given the 45% yes vote in [whenever it was] I find it hard to ignore
2014 I think! I agree there's a chance that they would vote for independence, and that would of course be their right, but don't feel they will.
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username4307230
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Irish reunification and Scottish independence are inevitabilities. It's just a matter of when. I think NI will probably sway to republican tendencies due to the DUP's behaviour and as NI begins to secularise, this will become more apparent.

Scotland on the other hand was close last time, and broken promises over the EU and devomax could push it away before 2025.

Wales on the other hand is too English in nature to ever properly leave the UK.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by SankaraInBloom)
Irish reunification and Scottish independence are inevitabilities. It's just a matter of when. I think NI will probably sway to republican tendencies due to the DUP's behaviour and as NI begins to secularise, this will become more apparent.

Scotland on the other hand was close last time, and broken promises over the EU and devomax could push it away before 2025.

Wales on the other hand is too English in nature to ever properly leave the UK.
If they ever even push for a referendum in N.I. then the whole backstop/border issue will become equivalent to a playground spat, I'm not advocating that but stating that's what would happen.
And Scotland, I feel, are not quite as anti union as the SNP think, it would be totally their right and I personally wouldn't argue against it because that would make me a hypocrite but I do believe that it would be a huge mistake for them to do so.
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username1976009
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(Original post by Mr.McRat)
Like what would make Wales, England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland just split into different countries?
An earthquake.
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L i b
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(Original post by SankaraInBloom)
Irish reunification and Scottish independence are inevitabilities. It's just a matter of when. I think NI will probably sway to republican tendencies due to the DUP's behaviour and as NI begins to secularise, this will become more apparent.

Scotland on the other hand was close last time, and broken promises over the EU and devomax could push it away before 2025.
Now, I won't even get into this, but who precisely promised - or even defined - "devomax" at any point? The eventual settlement in the Smith Commission went further than any individual party's outline of more powers that was presented before the independence referendum in 2014. It resulted in an incredible devolution of powers to the Scottish Parliament.

As for predictions about these things happening, just today we've had a poll commissioned by a former SNP deputy leader's organisation showing staying in the UK leading by 62% to 38% for independence - after they tried to hide the full data tables. In reality, the 2014 referendum had an 11 point lead, which ain't all that close, and the body of evidence shows its getting wider.

I think the more likely outlook - I never say inevitable, because that's a daft assertion to make and completely impossible to evidence - is that nationalism in Scotland reached its high water mark in 2014 and 2015, continues to decline and will be more or less irrelevant when (as polls currently show) the Scottish Parliament will lose its nationalist majority (between the SNP and Scottish Green Party) at the next election in 2021.
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Nucky
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Steff_gwyn
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(Original post by SankaraInBloom)
Irish reunification and Scottish independence are inevitabilities. It's just a matter of when. I think NI will probably sway to republican tendencies due to the DUP's behaviour and as NI begins to secularise, this will become more apparent.

Scotland on the other hand was close last time, and broken promises over the EU and devomax could push it away before 2025.

Wales on the other hand is too English in nature to ever properly leave the UK.
I really disagree with you on your last point that Wales is “too English in nature”. That simply isn’t true. We have our own language, which after English laws in the 19th and 20th centuries trying to kill it is back on the rise, and in parts of Wales it continues to be the first language for the majority of people. For example I am first language Welsh. We also have our own culture and our own resources which are abused by Westminster and people are beginning to realise that, especially with Plaid Cymru support at its highest, almost reaching the same amount of support that there is for Labour. There is also a lot of anger still within the Welsh people because of our history with England. You may not understand this, but if you look into it it’s very understandable. I feel there’s a lot of misinformation about this but hopefully more will begin to understand.
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Nucky
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(Original post by L i b)
Now, I won't even get into this, but who precisely promised - or even defined - "devomax" at any point? The eventual settlement in the Smith Commission went further than any individual party's outline of more powers that was presented before the independence referendum in 2014. It resulted in an incredible devolution of powers to the Scottish Parliament.

As for predictions about these things happening, just today we've had a poll commissioned by a former SNP deputy leader's organisation showing staying in the UK leading by 62% to 38% for independence - after they tried to hide the full data tables. In reality, the 2014 referendum had an 11 point lead, which ain't all that close, and the body of evidence shows its getting wider.

I think the more likely outlook - I never say inevitable, because that's a daft assertion to make and completely impossible to evidence - is that nationalism in Scotland reached its high water mark in 2014 and 2015, continues to decline and will be more or less irrelevant when (as polls currently show) the Scottish Parliament will lose its nationalist majority (between the SNP and Scottish Green Party) at the next election in 2021.
I assume you mean the latest Progress Scotland polling. Whats your source for the 62% to 38% figure, because its no where to be seen on their site. Nor is it being reported by any of the major media outlets.
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L i b
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(Original post by Nucky)
I assume you mean the latest Progress Scotland polling. Whats your source for the 62% to 38% figure, because its no where to be seen on their site. Nor is it being reported by any of the major media outlets.
Quite simply, my source is the data tables for the poll. It's a bit odd to suggest it wasn't reported, it was the Scottish Sun's political editor Chris Musson who revealed the data tables had been uploaded on Survation's website then taken down.

He wrote it up for Friday's paper, albeit with a focus on the 40% who "completely support Scotland staying part of the UK" vs the 24% who "completely support Scotland becoming independent" on a 0-10 scale.

The tables are still available on a few websites, but rather than linking to an Excel doc, here's the support for independence question:
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L i b
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(Original post by Steff_gwyn)
I really disagree with you on your last point that Wales is “too English in nature”. That simply isn’t true. We have our own language, which after English laws in the 19th and 20th centuries trying to kill it is back on the rise, and in parts of Wales it continues to be the first language for the majority of people.
There was never any "law", English or otherwise, prohibiting the use of Welsh in schools in Wales. Teachers, and no doubt local school boards, took a dim view of it as being backward; these were, of course, predominantly Welsh people.

For example I am first language Welsh. We also have our own culture and our own resources which are abused by Westminster and people are beginning to realise that
The UK Parliament has been a major driver of protecting the Welsh language in Wales, with legislation upholding its status since the 1940s. The Welsh Language Act 1993 secured the Welsh language an entirely equal status to English in Wales, creating the Welsh Language Board to promote it.


After 1999, many of these language powers were, quite reasonably, devolved to the new Welsh Assembly. The UK Parliament now has very little role in many of these issues, but upholds the principle of equal treatment of the language.

If you're going to talk about "misinformation" in a post, it's probably a good idea not to spread easily falsifiable misinformation yourself.
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SaucissonSecCy
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WTO brexit could. I'd like to see the reunification of Ireland, the end of the UK and an English parliament. On the table after that is a possible republic.
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Steff_gwyn
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(Original post by L i b)
The UK Parliament has been a major driver of protecting the Welsh language in Wales, with legislation upholding its status since the 1940s. The Welsh Language Act 1993 secured the Welsh language an entirely equal status to English in Wales, creating the Welsh Language Board to promote it.


After 1999, many of these language powers were, quite reasonably, devolved to the new Welsh Assembly. The UK Parliament now has very little role in many of these issues, but upholds the principle of equal treatment of the language.

If you're going to talk about "misinformation" in a post, it's probably a good idea not to spread easily falsifiable misinformation yourself.
Correct me if I’m wrong but I do believe the “Blue books” were written and the “Welsh Not” was implemented as a result of a commissioners enquiry into the state of education in Wales in the 1800s. This was one of the most devastating moments for the Welsh language, and it was indeed English law at the time which implemented it. I know technically this was also Welsh law because of the Wales and Berwick Act 1746 which saw Wales and England as one entity, and this was once more a part of England’s conquest to expand their empire and anglicise everything they could.
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