Orla_C1998
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Is 2hrs too long to travel up and down to university?
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MinaBee
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(Original post by Orla_C1998)
Is 2hrs too long to travel up and down to university?
Personally I'd say yes.
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username4340172
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Yeah that's really long and at the end of the week you'll feel really fatigued so wouldn't recommend it
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Orla_C1998
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See I want to study medicine but where I live there is only 1 uni that offers that as an undergrad so I may have no other choice🤦🏻*♀️
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Mikolaj1109
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yes as rarely is it gonna be 2 hours, oftentimes it'll be longer
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Mikolaj1109
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why not move away? Orla_C1998
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Orla_C1998
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I’m from n.ireland and the uni is in Dublin.. it’s a straight road the whole way down that’s why I was thinking it may be ok and reason being accommodation costs are extremely high down south that I simply couldn’t afford
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Mikolaj1109
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Orla_C1998 is there no uni offering medicine in northern ireland? What about just moving down and getting a job, money from parents? Or what about a med school in GB where you would get a maintenance loan for living costs which would be high if you say you can't afford accommodation so your parents clearly don't have a particularly high income.
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username4340172
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(Original post by Orla_C1998)
See I want to study medicine but where I live there is only 1 uni that offers that as an undergrad so I may have no other choice🤦🏻*♀️
Student finance or part time job could help?
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Orla_C1998
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There is 1 uni which is incredibly difficult to get into so keeping options open
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Mikolaj1109
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you can apply to 4, so QUB, then do 3 you can afford in GB? wouldn't that be simpler than a 2 hour commute to another country (unaided by Brexit and the backstop)
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Orla_C1998
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Student finance is tricky with ireland I would have to look into how it works and I would have no problem with a part time job but I would be interested to see a typical timetable for a undergrad medicine student to see what way I could work around it.
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Mikolaj1109
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would it even be possible to be a student at a uni i Ireland whilst resident in Northern Ireland?
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Orla_C1998
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Mikolaj1109 yes it would be as in Northern Ireland there is only 2 universities which makes is highly competitive.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by Orla_C1998)
Is 2hrs too long to travel up and down to university?
yes. even 1 hour is too long for uni (1 hour would be fine for work)
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Mikolaj1109
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Orla_C1998 i mean possible as in allowed, the same way you cant open a bank account in a country you do not live in. Can you be a student at a university in Ireland, without an address in Ireland, even if only during term. Competitiveness has no effect on if this is allowed.
You still haven’t explained why you wouldn’t consider a medical school in Britain
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Orla_C1998
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Mikolaj1109 due to the controversy between n.ireland and ireland it is possible. For example although I live in n.ireland, I have the same entitlement to apply for an Irish passport and also a UK passport.. it’s very confusing to understand if your not from n.ireland and I’m very much a ‘home bird’ reason being I would not apply for universities in Britain or any other country.
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Mikolaj1109
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Orla_C1998
I get what you’re saying but i think you’re missing the point of what I am trying to say. Your entitlement to it all is all fien and good and perfectly clear. However my point is, can you be a registered student of the university without having an address in that country. Imagine living in France but working in germany just across the border, whilst technically possible due to treaties avoiding double taxation, it is only through such treaties that this is possible. Hence, will the university in Ireland allow you to register as a student there, if you do not have an Irish address. The fact you can have an Irish passport is irrelevant here. It’s that you’re living in one country, and studying in another.
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Orla_C1998
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Mikolaj1109 as far as I am aware it is possible yes between the north and south of Ireland.
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Mikolaj1109
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double check with the uni, as it would be specific to them
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