Can't afford a Dyslexia evaluation; don't know how to get help in school

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addyslexia
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Turns out Dyslexia is like,,, the only learning disability that's not supported on the NHS. I'm from a low income family so will never be able to afford the £250 evaluation.

I know I have dyslexia; been in the family for ages, but went through school without ever been diagnosed, tested, or even spoken to. Just been told I was lazy, stupid, ect ect and that I'd never do anything with my life.

I just moved to do my A Levels, and I'm not able to scrape by anymore. My GCSE's were just easy enough to get C's and get into collage, but not my A Levels, and the years of receiving absolutely no help have finally caught up to me.

Basically, I can't spell, structure paragraphs, or write quickly. I try really really hard, practising for hours each day, but nothing - seems my efforts just create new mistakes.
I ramble too much, I try to fix this and I leave tons of info out.
My spelling's bad? I try to use words I can spell and my vocabulary is too limited.
My handwriting is unreadable? I try to write slower and don't finish even close to on time.
My paragraphs are disorganised? I try to plan out everything I'm going to say and run out of time.
It's been this since as long as I can remember.

I'm in a new school now; they don't have the experience with me to know what's going on. I feel like if I go to the SENCO person in my school I'm not gonna be believed, or they're gonna try ignore me, or whatever else, because no one has refereed me to her.
Even if I did go to her, can they even help because I haven't been diagnosed?
Would they even listen to what I think would help me best? (I mean, working class newbe in a posh school, I doubt it).
Because I've been thinking of this for years, and extra time or a reader (because that's all they seem to suggest to dyslexics from what I've heard) wouldn't help. I just want a laptop so I can write everything down, then edit anything I need to, but from what I've heard they will do everything to not give you one.

Tangent aside; how does this whole process work? I really don't know what to expect, assuming I got all the help I needed.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by addyslexia)
Turns out Dyslexia is like,,, the only learning disability that's not supported on the NHS. I'm from a low income family so will never be able to afford the £250 evaluation.

I know I have dyslexia; been in the family for ages, but went through school without ever been diagnosed, tested, or even spoken to. Just been told I was lazy, stupid, ect ect and that I'd never do anything with my life.

I just moved to do my A Levels, and I'm not able to scrape by anymore. My GCSE's were just easy enough to get C's and get into collage, but not my A Levels, and the years of receiving absolutely no help have finally caught up to me.

Basically, I can't spell, structure paragraphs, or write quickly. I try really really hard, practising for hours each day, but nothing - seems my efforts just create new mistakes.
I ramble too much, I try to fix this and I leave tons of info out.
My spelling's bad? I try to use words I can spell and my vocabulary is too limited.
My handwriting is unreadable? I try to write slower and don't finish even close to on time.
My paragraphs are disorganised? I try to plan out everything I'm going to say and run out of time.
It's been this since as long as I can remember.

I'm in a new school now; they don't have the experience with me to know what's going on. I feel like if I go to the SENCO person in my school I'm not gonna be believed, or they're gonna try ignore me, or whatever else, because no one has refereed me to her.
Even if I did go to her, can they even help because I haven't been diagnosed?
Would they even listen to what I think would help me best? (I mean, working class newbe in a posh school, I doubt it).
Because I've been thinking of this for years, and extra time or a reader (because that's all they seem to suggest to dyslexics from what I've heard) wouldn't help. I just want a laptop so I can write everything down, then edit anything I need to, but from what I've heard they will do everything to not give you one.

Tangent aside; how does this whole process work? I really don't know what to expect, assuming I got all the help I needed.
Try the senco but the funding for older students is pretty scarce. You need to see an educational psychologist, I d speak to the British dyslexia association to see if they can find someone cheaper but my uni subsided my diagnosis when is as 18 so it was then £185 and well worth it for how much support I got. Extra time and a reader can really make a difference, you d get a lot more help than that on top at uni if you do decide to get help.

If you want another dyslexic person (I m also dyspraxic person) to rant at then feel free to message me.
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addyslexia
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Try the senco but the funding for older students is pretty scarce. You need to see an educational psychologist, I d speak to the British dyslexia association to see if they can find someone cheaper but my uni subsided my diagnosis when is as 18 so it was then £185 and well worth it for how much support I got. Extra time and a reader can really make a difference, you d get a lot more help than that on top at uni if you do decide to get help.

If you want another dyslexic person (I m also dyspraxic person) to rant at then feel free to message me.
Time and a reader wouldn't help, trust me. I finished my GCSE's with no problems with timing. The problem isn't not being able to keep time or read, the problem is I just can't get the words out correctly first time, or spell, or whatever. It's all disorganised, grammatically muddled, and my spelling is often incomprehensible. (also, I'll write things like "ish", "ritch", ect w/o noticing).

Also, by "low income", I mean it has to be free or we can't afford it. To illustrate; I haven't had my hair cut in nearly 10 months, am using a broken chair that gives me back problems, and we often run out of food. We'll never be able to afford it. Also, as for uni, I don't think I'll make it to uni if I don't get help with my exams. I'm not getting the grades I need and I'm honestly so depressed over it because I'm trying so hard.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by addyslexia)
Time and a reader wouldn't help, trust me. I finished my GCSE's with no problems with timing. The problem isn't not being able to keep time or read, the problem is I just can't get the words out correctly first time, or spell, or whatever. It's all disorganised, grammatically muddled, and my spelling is often incomprehensible. (also, I'll write things like "ish", "ritch", ect w/o noticing).

Also, by "low income", I mean it has to be free or we can't afford it. To illustrate; I haven't had my hair cut in nearly 10 months, am using a broken chair that gives me back problems, and we often run out of food. We'll never be able to afford it.
Universities have funds to cover the sort of thing, i paid mine out of my student overdraft then claimed it back. Sounds like text to speech/ speech to text software and a laptop would be quite beneficial for you . You could see if your senco would at least do a screening with you if nothing else.
You say you're having handwriting problems too, it could be possible that you have dyspraxia or dysgraphia as well, it's rare but the nhs can in some areas diagnose adults with dyspraxia. Look into charity grants online, there could be something out there that might help.
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claireestelle
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I got into uni with BEE, there'll always be foundation years as an option in clearing.
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addyslexia
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(Original post by claireestelle)
I got into uni with BEE, there'll always be foundation years as an option in clearing.
My mum's told me if I have to do a foundation year I'm moving out and getting a job; with my social anxiety and general health issues that makes 90% of jobs near impossible for me.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by addyslexia)
My mum's told me if I have to do a foundation year I'm moving out and getting a job; with my social anxiety and general health issues that makes 90% of jobs near impossible for me.
if your family is on a low income, then you should get the maximum loan, if you pick a not so expensive uni city you could easily manage without a job.
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petertyerman
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The equality act 2010 backed by the courts suggest that reasonable adjustments have to be made when the disability (dyslexia) is suspected and there is evidence to support the diagnosis. What you have said on here suggest this would be the situation. The educational institution that you are now in on being given the information is legally obliged to assess what adjustments or support you need. The best way is a full dyslexia assessment but that costs, as you are aware money the establishment may not wish to spend however refusing to spend the money to do a dyslexia assessment, does not get them out of their duty to assess for and make reasonable adjustments. I would ensure that the same co-at the establishment you are attending is made aware in writing to you believe that you are dyslexic and there is evidence from your performance to support this diagnosis and you therefore are requesting that they assess what adjustments can be put in place to support you and see what response you get.
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addyslexia
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(Original post by petertyerman)
The equality act 2010 backed by the courts suggest that reasonable adjustments have to be made when the disability (dyslexia) is suspected and there is evidence to support the diagnosis. What you have said on here suggest this would be the situation. The educational institution that you are now in on being given the information is legally obliged to assess what adjustments or support you need. The best way is a full dyslexia assessment but that costs, as you are aware money the establishment may not wish to spend however refusing to spend the money to do a dyslexia assessment, does not get them out of their duty to assess for and make reasonable adjustments. I would ensure that the same co-at the establishment you are attending is made aware in writing to you believe that you are dyslexic and there is evidence from your performance to support this diagnosis and you therefore are requesting that they assess what adjustments can be put in place to support you and see what response you get.
Well it seems very likely as both my mum, grandad, and uncle have it.
I'll see what the schools says, but if they decide not to help is there nothing I can do?
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petertyerman
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you can take the to a tribunal can be done yourself but would need to read up the law but even the suggestion might make them react
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Tootles
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Try the senco but the funding for older students is pretty scarce. You need to see an educational psychologist, I d speak to the British dyslexia association to see if they can find someone cheaper but my uni subsided my diagnosis when is as 18 so it was then £185 and well worth it for how much support I got. Extra time and a reader can really make a difference, you d get a lot more help than that on top at uni if you do decide to get help.

If you want another dyslexic person (I m also dyspraxic person) to rant at then feel free to message me.
The school should be able to cover it, surely? I got my diagnosis at 22 and the uni I was at paid for it (£400 I think). It was too little too late though. First suspicions of my dyslexia and autism went back to primary school, but they all thought I was too "high-functioning" to be autistic and too good at reading to be dyslexic. Heh, joke was on them.

(Original post by petertyerman)
you can take the to a tribunal can be done yourself but would need to read up the law but even the suggestion might make them react
Typical entitled kiddie mentality.

There is no law that says a suspicion of a learning difficulty must be followed up by a school/college. The law says that people who are documented with disabilities must be given equal treatment.
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Micshe
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First port of call is the Senco.
Get your mother to give her concerns her regarding your suspicions of dyslexia.
Speak to each teacher as they may suspect that you have difficulty and may assume that you have been tested, which is not correct.

Each teacher can then make an assessment of your ability in their respective subjects to aid your diagnosis with the senco.

You need to do a series of tests, to appraise your personal problems with either processing words etc.

All my three children have dyslexia, not diagnosed until oldest just before her exams for Gcses.
I as a parent had to push hard and state they had a duty of care under "everyone matters".

They did the assessment not expecting any diagnosis.
Well they all have it.
To put things into perspective, oldest now studying to be a vet, second child just received offer for medicine and youngest is doing A levels with additional times in exams.

Oldest also now diagnosed with dyspraxia via University and has dsa support. That is really hard to prove, but the earlier you get the evidence it will help your case, and help get you a diagnosis to assist later on.

With dyslexics, learning means thinking out of the box sometimes, having to learn slightly differently than the "norm".
I always say, if you have dyslexia you are usually brilliant in some area. Maybe art, creative thinking, could be music or Maths.
Loads of genius were dyslexic and had to push hard to get where they were.

I am also a one parent family who works, with a disabled father I care for. So don't right yourself off.

Put down your concerns in bullet points, put these together, discuss with parent, teachers and book an appointment to see the senco and ask for a dyslexia test.

My children originally did one area followed by the whole test as they were really shocked at the results.

Mine have visual stress as well, so use coloured lenses. So it will depend on your learning needs.

Good luck.... And yep virtually all my side of the family are dyslexic.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Tootles)
The school should be able to cover it, surely? I got my diagnosis at 22 and the uni I was at paid for it (£400 I think). It was too little too late though. First suspicions of my dyslexia and autism went back to primary school, but they all thought I was too "high-functioning" to be autistic and too good at reading to be dyslexic. Heh, joke was on them.


Typical entitled kiddie mentality.

There is no law that says a suspicion of a learning difficulty must be followed up by a school/college. The law says that people who are documented with disabilities must be given equal treatment.
Not really, I m part of a few Facebook support groups and many parents have been told no funding for older kids so have gone private. My mp had to write a couple of letters to our mp to get my sister diagnosed with Asperger's as the waiting list was well over a year (she's got a fair few dyspraxic traits too).
Yeah I got my dyspraxic diagnosis at ten but next to no support anyway after it because I was passing until a level and no one suspected dyslexia just had to have more recent evidence for uni and the ed psych was like "has anyone ever mentioned about your reading to you".
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Tootles
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Not really, I m part of a few Facebook support groups and many parents have been told no funding for older kids so have gone private. My mp had to write a couple of letters to our mp to get my sister diagnosed with Asperger's as the waiting list was well over a year (she's got a fair few dyspraxic traits too).
Yeah I got my dyspraxic diagnosis at ten but next to no support anyway after it because I was passing until a level and no one suspected dyslexia just had to have more recent evidence for uni and the ed psych was like "has anyone ever mentioned about your reading to you".
Oh. That is disappointing.

I had to fight for my Asperger's diagnosis too. Wasn't quite writing letters to my MP but there was a lot of backing and forthing, and proving that it wasn't my depression/anxiety (I have diagnoses of both) playing up. Took a year to get the funding and then about three months to actually get the assessment. Was worth it though, to be fair.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Tootles)
Oh. That is disappointing.

I had to fight for my Asperger's diagnosis too. Wasn't quite writing letters to my MP but there was a lot of backing and forthing, and proving that it wasn't my depression/anxiety (I have diagnoses of both) playing up. Took a year to get the funding and then about three months to actually get the assessment. Was worth it though, to be fair.
Funding in schools/LAs is unfortunately pretty much at a crisis point and post-16 students get even less funding.

If students are entitled to extra help in school, schools have to now fund the first £6000 of support themselves (many schools don't get that much funding per student full stop to put it into perspective) so there can also be an incentive not to diagnose.

A lot of people have fight for help and support and it's now seen as normal to have to go to tribunal to get an ECHP (used to be called a statement).

Sorry OP, I know none of this is very encouraging, but do speak to your SENCO, as they may at least be able to get the ball rolling in some way.

If A-levels don't work out, there are lots of alternative routes to university, and a foundation year could definitely be affordable without a job alongside.
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