squirell1707
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Can anyone please give me quotes for An Inspector Calls, Romeo and Juliet, A Christmas Carol and for AQA poems (Power and Conflict)
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Parker Tracy
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(Original post by squirell1707)
Can anyone please give me quotes for An Inspector Calls, Romeo and Juliet, A Christmas Carol and for AQA poems (Power and Conflict)
I would advise you to go through each of these texts and consider, in relation to the work you have done, and in relation to past papers, that you select relevant quotes. No one else can do this for you. This is essentially looking at quotes that define the characters, and character development, that support pivotal moments in the text, and turning points in the plot, and quotes which support key themes - for instance, in "A christmas carol" you might look at the theme of greed, or regret. The very act of doing this work will assist you in learning the quotes, and learning the text - which is the only way to do well in the exam. Good luck to you.
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squirell1707
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Thank you for the response also I would like to ask if you could give me a few tips how to write analytical paragraphs better as I’m only getting grade 4s right now and I would like to pass my English at the least
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Parker Tracy
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Sure - this is easy. There are some things we always do when writing a paragraph -

(1) we structure it well. So we start off by telling the reader what the paragraph is going to be about. So start with a thesis sentence: "Jason Compson is a character who is motivated by envy." This tells the reader, 'Ok, we're going to hear about Jason's narration in the novel. And, we're going to hear how he is full of hate and envy'. Here's another one: "Hamlet's madness is ambiguous". So, in this paragraph we know there will be pros and cons on whether Hamlet is mad or not.

(2) We always use supporting quotes. So, for our Hamlet example, we will use the quote "though this be madness, yet there is method in 't". We never just speculate, or offer opinion. If we claim something, we have a quote backing it up. Always. Always, always. The examiner does not care what we think, s/he cares what the writer has said. It is our job to produce the evidence. Like a lawyer. We show the evidence of what the writer has said.

(3) We consider closely not just what the writer has said, but how she has said it. This is where we become surgeons. We examine the inner workings of the text. What techniques has the writer used? Have they used alliteration to make us feel a particular emotion? Have they used a particular metaphor? Have they set the scene in a place with particular connotations? So, in a novel by Balzac, he has a scene, set in a garden, where one character talks to another, and there are a lot of alliterative S sounds, that sound like a snake. This connotes Eve's temptation by the serpent in the garden of Eden. Thus, we know that one of the characters is evil, and the other character is tempted.

(4) Grammar and flow. Make sure that you write in grammatically correct sentences. Make sure these are properly punctuated. Full stops, capital letters, that quotes have inverted commas around them, and are clearly delineated from the rest of the text. Make sure that you use clear 'joining' words so that there is flow between your sentences. These words are:
where we are drawing distinction: "however", "in contrast", "on the other hand", "in opposition to this", "contra".
where we are drawing a parallel: "similarly', "equally", "it is also the case", "likewise"

(5) Make sure your introduction sets up your thesis - in other words - what is your argument, and what will you cover in this essay. If the say asks you about exploring passion in "Gatsby" you might say "Love relationships are central to the plot of "the Great Gatsby". I will explore the passion within these relationships, but I also intend to exam the individual passions, which could be called 'obsessions' for some of these characters. This will include, Nick's passion for the truth, Gatsby's passion for success, and Jordan's passion to be idolised"

(6) your conclusion should summarise your essay - not merely repeat your arguments, but draw these together. "In conclusion" - and then you should summarise what you want the reader to be left with.

Does this help?
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squirell1707
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Oh my god I can’t even thatum my gratitude. Thank you so much I actually understand analysing now, they way you wordered it I could imagine what you meant like when you said about being a detective and surgeon. Thank you again
(Original post by LiyoS)
Sure - this is easy. There are some things we always do when writing a paragraph -

(1) we structure it well. So we start off by telling the reader what the paragraph is going to be about. So start with a thesis sentence: "Jason Compson is a character who is motivated by envy." This tells the reader, 'Ok, we're going to hear about Jason's narration in the novel. And, we're going to hear how he is full of hate and envy'. Here's another one: "Hamlet's madness is ambiguous". So, in this paragraph we know there will be pros and cons on whether Hamlet is mad or not.

(2) We always use supporting quotes. So, for our Hamlet example, we will use the quote "though this be madness, yet there is method in 't". We never just speculate, or offer opinion. If we claim something, we have a quote backing it up. Always. Always, always. The examiner does not care what we think, s/he cares what the writer has said. It is our job to produce the evidence. Like a lawyer. We show the evidence of what the writer has said.

(3) We consider closely not just what the writer has said, but how she has said it. This is where we become surgeons. We examine the inner workings of the text. What techniques has the writer used? Have they used alliteration to make us feel a particular emotion? Have they used a particular metaphor? Have they set the scene in a place with particular connotations? So, in a novel by Balzac, he has a scene, set in a garden, where one character talks to another, and there are a lot of alliterative S sounds, that sound like a snake. This connotes Eve's temptation by the serpent in the garden of Eden. Thus, we know that one of the characters is evil, and the other character is tempted.

(4) Grammar and flow. Make sure that you write in grammatically correct sentences. Make sure these are properly punctuated. Full stops, capital letters, that quotes have inverted commas around them, and are clearly delineated from the rest of the text. Make sure that you use clear 'joining' words so that there is flow between your sentences. These words are:
where we are drawing distinction: "however", "in contrast", "on the other hand", "in opposition to this", "contra".
where we are drawing a parallel: "similarly', "equally", "it is also the case", "likewise"

(5) Make sure your introduction sets up your thesis - in other words - what is your argument, and what will you cover in this essay. If the say asks you about exploring passion in "Gatsby" you might say "Love relationships are central to the plot of "the Great Gatsby". I will explore the passion within these relationships, but I also intend to exam the individual passions, which could be called 'obsessions' for some of these characters. This will include, Nick's passion for the truth, Gatsby's passion for success, and Jordan's passion to be idolised"

(6) your conclusion should summarise your essay - not merely repeat your arguments, but draw these together. "In conclusion" - and then you should summarise what you want the reader to be left with.

Does this help?
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Parker Tracy
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You are very welcome. happy to help you.
(Original post by squirell1707)
Oh my god I can’t even thatum my gratitude. Thank you so much I actually understand analysing now, they way you wordered it I could imagine what you meant like when you said about being a detective and surgeon. Thank you again
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