Esra Ozkaya
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Are all neutralisation reactions exothermic?
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charco
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(Original post by Esra Ozkaya)
Are all neutralisation reactions exothermic?
Surprisingly not
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Kallisto
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You are refering to acid-base reaction, I suppose so.

To answer this question, you have to understand the meaning of endothermic and exothermic reaction.

Endothermic mean that amounts of (thermal) energy has to spend that a reaction starts. Exothermic in turn means that an amount of (thermal) energy is released during reaction.

As neutralisation reactions always release amounts of energy when acids and bases react with each other, it is always exothermic.
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charco
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(Original post by Kallisto)
You are refering to acid-base reaction, I suppose so.

To answer this question, you have to understand the meaning of endothermic and exothermic reaction.

Endothermic mean that amounts of (thermal) energy has to spend that a reaction starts. Exothermic in turn means that an amount of (thermal) energy is released during reaction.

As neutralisation reactions always release amounts of energy when acids and bases react with each other, it is always exothermic.
Not correct...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E12Gan-Gs0
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username1445490
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Neutralisation is H+ (aq) + OH- (aq) --> H2O (l) This is always exothermic. it is -58 kJmol-1
If a strong acid and strong base are used then the result will be very close to this value.
If a weak acid or base is used then the value will be less negative as some energy is required to dissociate the acid or to form the OH- ions when the weak base reacts with water.

You may see an endothermic reaction involving neutralisation but this will involve a solid such as citric acid react with sodium hydrogen carbonate solution.
These are more involved reactions and require the solid to dissolve before reacting and the dissolution process is highly endothermic which results in a temperature drop so it is considered endothermic but the neutralisation part is still exothermic.

https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical...alisation.html
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Kallisto
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charco and Madasahatter I thank you two for correction. Was just referred to reaction process only without to consider the other aspects of neutralisation reaction.
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username1445490
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(Original post by Kallisto)
charco and Madasahatter I thank you two for correction. Was just referred to reaction process only without to consider the other aspects of neutralisation reaction.
I think it is a poorly worded question as it can be interpreted in more than one way.
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annabrooksbank22
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thank you
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