People who were too young for a Brexit vote: how do you feel? Watch

anya grace
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#21
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#21
yeah I'm completely not outraged at Brexit and how it's going to affect my future, not at all worried whatsoever, I'm super chilled about it not stressed for my generation at all, because of course I'm fifteen so there are no emotions in this body
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
if they were too young to vote they're too young to have a say or to feel any emotions or effects at all.
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Je suis Groot
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#22
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#22
brexit is a waste of time, I feel like its a good thing, because with the large number of unskilled EU citizens coming into the UK, would mean mnore competitions with others who want to work for a lower price. The only reason I am agaisnt brexit is because there is just too much fuss, to many questions, opinions, choices and outputs. If we could clear it all i would be as happy as a
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Bang Outta Order
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#23
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#23
(Original post by <nell>)
How does this mean they don't feel any emotions? Also, they'll still feel the effects of Brexit, no matter their age.
lol a 14 yr old will not feel the affects of brexit. 14 yr olds don't even fully know what brexit is. a 14 yr old might feel the effects of their parent losing their job but will not feel the effects of a first world country losing a friendship. that is a general situation that will indirectly affect even brexit voters for a large portion of its implementation.
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Je suis Groot
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#24
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#24
(Original post by pon1de2replay3)
what part of what i said is untrue?
What mess are we in? I havent seen a single fact in what you have said,
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Bang Outta Order
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#25
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#25
(Original post by anya grace)
yeah I'm completely not outraged at Brexit and how it's going to affect my future, not at all worried whatsoever, I'm super chilled about it not stressed for my generation at all, because of course I'm fifteen so there are no emotions in this body
lol calm down. like i said to the other person, brexit's effects will mainly be indirect. do you know indirect? people said the world would end with trump and that america would fall and suffer. most americans forgot the guy was in. :lol:
Last edited by Bang Outta Order; 2 months ago
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BlueIndigoViolet
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#26
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#26
was 2 months of being 18 - dumb decision, and for sure will be a bitter pill to swallow, think we will however rejoin in the next 30 years with a less deluded generation....
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<nell>
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#27
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#27
Just to point out, I'm full aware of what Brexit is and that comment is rather ageist. The effects of Brexit will pretty much affect everyone and will go on well into my adulthood.
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
lol a 14 yr old will not feel the affects of brexit. 14 yr olds don't even fully know what brexit is. a 14 yr old might feel the effects of their parent losing their job but will not feel the effects of a first world country losing a friendship. that is a general situation that will indirectly affect even brexit voters for a large portion of its implementation.
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Bang Outta Order
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#28
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#28
(Original post by <nell>)
Just to point out, I'm full aware of what Brexit is and that comment is rather ageist. The effects of Brexit will pretty much affect everyone and will go on well into my adulthood.
aye. you must be from this generation. adding "ist" to the end of a word and using it as a weapon. and how is it "ageist" to say that brexit will indirectly affect us... go on then. tell me these effects of brexit, and how they will directly affect you and me. homework for tonight. due in an hour.
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<nell>
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
aye. you must be from this generation. adding "ist" to the end of a word and using it as a weapon. and how is it "ageist" to say that brexit will indirectly affect us... go on then. tell me these effects of brexit, and how they will directly affect you and me. homework for tonight. due in an hour.
I'm not using it as a weapon, I'm simply just pointing out that you were stereotyping against 14 year olds.
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iseesparksfly
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#30
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#30
(Original post by random_matt)
No life experience, voting should be 25 minimum.
Life experience doesn't necessarily make anyone more informed about politics. I'm 20, 17 at the time of the vote, and I knew more about politics than a lot of people older than me who were able to vote. There should be a minimum of course, I think 17, but belittling people who are perfectly educated on these things is stupid. Criticise people of all ages who vote without literally any actual knowledge.

TLDR: Your opinion is stupid
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iseesparksfly
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Je suis Groot)
brexit is a waste of time, I feel like its a good thing, because with the large number of unskilled EU citizens coming into the UK, would mean mnore competitions with others who want to work for a lower price. The only reason I am agaisnt brexit is because there is just too much fuss, to many questions, opinions, choices and outputs. If we could clear it all i would be as happy as a
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What about all od the skilled EU citizens coming? Also, by your logic of only skilled people deserving a place, should we start kicking people out because they don't fit a standard?
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Bang Outta Order
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#32
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#32
(Original post by <nell>)
I'm not using it as a weapon, I'm simply just pointing out that you were stereotyping against 14 year olds.
exactly. cant even explain your own thoughts. cant even answer what brexit is and how it will affect us. go eat and revise. politics is a big man's game. you're probably a good kid. dont grow up too fast.
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ltsmith
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#33
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#33
young people always vote left.
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random_matt
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#34
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#34
(Original post by iseesparksfly)
Life experience doesn't necessarily make anyone more informed about politics. I'm 20, 17 at the time of the vote, and I knew more about politics than a lot of people older than me who were able to vote. There should be a minimum of course, I think 17, but belittling people who are perfectly educated on these things is stupid. Criticise people of all ages who vote without literally any actual knowledge.

TLDR: Your opinion is stupid
Thanks for confirming your age.
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<nell>
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
exactly. cant even explain your own thoughts. cant even answer what brexit is and how it will affect us. go eat and revise. politics is a big man's game. you're probably a good kid. dont grow up too fast.
I'm not engaging in this discussion anymore...if you can even call it a discussion.
Just because I haven't explained my thoughts doesn't mean I'm unable to.
I'm fully aware of what Brexit is and it's implications. The fact that you've told me several times that I don't know what it is, gives me the impression that actually it's you who doesn't know what it is.
' politics is a big man's game ' I'm not even going to address that point … do you realise how that makes you sound?
Just taking an interest in politics isn't growing up too fast.

Thanks for the compliment about me being a 'good kid' and I'll take the advice on eating and revising.
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BlueIndigoViolet
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#36
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#36
Dumb decision, a lot of people more clueless than 16 year olds who were allowed to vote in IndyRef... will rejoin in the next 30 years, when the current deluded generations goes away
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fallen_acorns
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#37
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#37
(Original post by angelinahx)
Of course they'll complain. I'd complain.
I moved to London alone from a foreign country by the age of 16. I signed by own rental agreement at the age of 17 and I travelled and hitchhiked Europe alone at 17. I got my first full-time job at 16 and have worked part time alongside my studies since 16. I've paid tax into two government systems before I was eligible to vote and have a say on what my money should be spent on in either country.
I applied for universities without parental or teacher advice.
My parents are still there, supporting me all the way, but age does not determine independence/life experience. There are 25 year olds who still live at home with their parents.
I am not any more "independent" now when I was when I was 17, the only difference is that I can legally get smashed. I'm not more politically aware.
You sound like you should have been able to vote at 17, it seems like you could have handled it. Given that were and presumably are so mature and capable - you can of course understand that you are very much the exception rather than the norm within the UK, and when you are making generalized policies that have to apply for the whole country, the experiences and ability of the exceptions are irrelevant. Unless you advocate for some manner of meritocratic based voting system, your individual capability as 17 year old makes no difference to whether the voting age should be lowered or not.


(Original post by <nell>)
😲!! 25 is ridiculous.
You become an adult at 18 so you should be allowed to vote at this age.
The arguments for raising the voting age (which are purely hypothetical, as it will never happen) - are that these days societal norms have shifted so much that 18 year olds no longer display the majority of the characteristics that used to define you as an 'adult'. Yes you may legally be an adult, but most 18 year olds are not adult, in a societal sense. They don't play the traditional 'adult' role as society used to define it, and by previous generations standards, play far more of an adolescent role.
(Original post by pon1de2replay3)
ive got enough life experience to know that brexit is ****ed and if younger people had voted (and maybe they'd put a cap on old people voting who will be dead before we feel the effects of brexit), maybe we wouldn't be in the mess we're in now. it's our future
its a 14 year olds future more then a 16 year old.. who are you to deny them the right to decide, when its more their future?
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pon1de2replay3
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Je suis Groot)
What mess are we in? I havent seen a single fact in what you have said,
yeah no mess at all mate what was I thinking - brexi is going exactly to plan
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pon1de2replay3
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#39
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#39
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
You sound like you should have been able to vote at 17, it seems like you could have handled it. Given that were and presumably are so mature and capable - you can of course understand that you are very much the exception rather than the norm within the UK, and when you are making generalized policies that have to apply for the whole country, the experiences and ability of the exceptions are irrelevant. Unless you advocate for some manner of meritocratic based voting system, your individual capability as 17 year old makes no difference to whether the voting age should be lowered or not.



The arguments for raising the voting age (which are purely hypothetical, as it will never happen) - are that these days societal norms have shifted so much that 18 year olds no longer display the majority of the characteristics that used to define you as an 'adult'. Yes you may legally be an adult, but most 18 year olds are not adult, in a societal sense. They don't play the traditional 'adult' role as society used to define it, and by previous generations standards, play far more of an adolescent role.

its a 14 year olds future more then a 16 year old.. who are you to deny them the right to decide, when
yeas but obviously i can understand how 14 year olds do not have the maturity. however I think given proper political education in school , 16 year olds would be mature enough to vote (on behalf of those 14 year olds if u think about it)
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Obolinda
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#40
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#40
(Original post by pon1de2replay3)
yeas but obviously i can understand how 14 year olds do not have the maturity.
Feel insulted.. Lol, jk
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