Why is dynamic equilibrium better than static?

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dynasaur666
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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Hi guys, just a brief one.

I have 100kg of reactant.

I want 100kg of product. Via some perfect industrial process, I get it. (I know this never happens; the theoretical yield never equals the actual yield... That’s not the focus of this question.)

My question is, how on earth is that process affected at all by whether or not what’s going inside in the reaction vessel is ‘dynamic’ or not?

Why do I need a bubbling broth of chemicals that are constantly flitting between reactant and product state, when all I’m actually after is the product?

I asked someone about this recently and they said it might be because you can recycle unreacted reactant in a dynamic system. Can you not do that in a static system, an irreversible one??

I just really, really just don’t get it . Please someone put me out of my misery…
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dynasaur666
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Or am I just looking at this the wrong way? Is it that no one's trying to argue there are commercial advantages to a dynamic system over a static one; it's just that this is how you maximise yield from a reaction that happens to be dynamic...?

It just seemed like the course content was suggesting the former
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ThunderBeard
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Yes, I think so. Most chemical reversible reactions carry on happening after equilibrium has been reached. According to le chateliers principle if you decrease product moles (by removing it), more product will be formed. This helps you reach your maximum yield.
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