abdullahAK
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hello,
I have been doing Acid/bases chapter,there's one thing I couldn't get which is why do we take aqueous solutions in titration,I means why can't we take calcium oxide however,aqueous solution of calcium oxide is used.
thanks .
0
reply
Daisy87!
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
When they’re in aqueous solution, the acid/bases Ions are able to fully dissociate.
0
reply
abdullahAK
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
glad that someone replied,but Daisy if opt the other way around how it would be different?Thanks a lot.
0
reply
Daisy87!
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by abdullahAK)
glad that someone replied,but Daisy if opt the other way around how it would be different?Thanks a lot.
What do you mean by opt?
0
reply
abdullahAK
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
I mean if we simply use for instance"Calcium oxide rather than its aqueous solution " will it not work when using titration method?
0
reply
Daisy87!
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
Aqueous solution simply refers to the state of the compound or element. Aqueous solution is needed for a titration rather than solid. You can still use calcium oxide but it’s state symbols will be (aq) not (s)
0
reply
abdullahAK
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
Oh,it means it works both ways.
Thanks for your really "quick" replies.
0
reply
Mr.noname
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by abdullahAK)
Oh,it means it works both ways.
Thanks for your really "quick" replies.
Suppose if it was solid how do plan to use it in a burette ? Where as for aqueous solutions can can use it in the burette or flask.
The primary reason why most acid base titration require aq solutions is because strong acids (almost) dissociate fully so in the case of HCl it will exist as H+ and Cl- and for HNO3 it will exist as H+ and NO3-. So for a strong base e.g. NaOH which also protonates to Na+ and OH- in solution the two reactions that will occur are:
Cl- + Na+ -----> NaCl (formation of salt)
OH- + H+------->H2O (formation of water)
Similarly for another strong acid like HNO3 water is still formed in the same way but just a different salt:
NO3- + Na+ -----> NaNO3 (formation of salt)
OH- + H+------->H2O (formation of water)
So if you use a solid base or acid in titrations the compound will first dissolve in the solution of the other compound then it will react with it in ionic state, for an accurate process like titration you want everything to happen instantly so you get the closest possible value to the true value.
1
reply
abdullahAK
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
Thanks Mr.noname for such a great explanation.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (18)
7.35%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (37)
15.1%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (44)
17.96%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (35)
14.29%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (64)
26.12%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (47)
19.18%

Watched Threads

View All