2:2 Psychology Graduate seeking career/life advice from...

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Sam A
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Hi there, If you are a 2:2 graduate who has managed to make things work, move out of their parents house and live independently (without benefits) please advise me.

Graduated a few years ago with a 2:2 in Psychology. Still living in parents house and now jobless. I live in the living room and can't even make commitment to a Job because I can only sleep when everyone else has going to sleep which is sometimes as late as 3am.

Tried to ride it out before and work while in this situation but my brain started to break down and I would constantly forget and misplace important things at work. It's only when I finally stopped working that I realised that it is the lack of sleep that was affecting my functioning.

Should I just focus on something I can do during the inconsistent hours that I am awake (like running a website)? Please give me some advice guys, if you got a 2:2, how did you manage to make things work and move out? If you are in a similar situation, feel free to share your story also.

Cheers
Last edited by Sam A; 1 year ago
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TrojanH
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Lots of careers don't ask for a degree specifically.

HR, Social work, etc are all heavily asking for more resources.

You could always learn to code/enroll at a Bootcamp, good ones are free if your on JSA.
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Sam A
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Thanks for your reply Trojan.

Hr and social work make sense .If you really don't need a degree then it makes sense that a 2:2 shouldn't be an issue.

Coding is new though...have you found it to be a good way to make a living/know anyone who has made it work? If you haven't that's fine, I am still interested to hear why you think coding would be good.

Cheers

(Original post by TrojanH)
Lots of careers don't ask for a degree specifically.

HR, Social work, etc are all heavily asking for more resources.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Sam A)
Hi there, If you are a 2:2 graduate who has managed to make things work, move out of their parents house and live independently (without benefits) please advise me.

Graduated a few years ago with a 2:2 in Psychology. Still living in parents house and now jobless. I live in the living room and can't even make commitment to a Job because I can only sleep when everyone else has going to sleep which is sometimes is as late as 3am.

Tried to ride it out before and work while in this situation but my brain started to break down and I would constantly forget and misplace important things at work. It's only when I finally stopped working that I realised that it is the lack of sleep that was affecting my functioning.

Should i just focus on something I can do during the inconsistent hours that I am awake (like running a website)? Please give me some advice guys, if you got a 2:2, how did you manage to make things work and move out? If you are in a similar situation, feel free to share your story also.

Cheers
Hey, sorry to hear about your living situation. Sounds really tough. Which part of the country are you in? What type(s) of work have you done (if any)?
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Sam A
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Thanks for your concern.

I live in London. I've done some tutoring but don't want to go into teaching. The boss was awesome and he didn't want me to leave but i'd spent so long out of education at that point that the students were running circles around me academically. Graduated 2014 and was tutoring like 2017 I think.

EDIT: and the tutoring was only part time a few hours a week
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Sam A)
Thanks for your concern.

I live in London. I've done some tutoring but don't want to go into teaching. The boss was awesome and he didn't want me to leave but i'd spent so long out of education at that point that the students were running circles around me academically. Graduated 2014 and was tutoring like 2017 I think.
Ok, so London. Very expensive to move away from home (as you know). Difficult (I think - but may be wrong) to get social housing. Some public sector related roles which might be suggested are tougher salary wise than some other locations (which you also know). You can live pretty well as a teacher in West Yorkshire, not so much in London.

On the positive side there are lots of jobs to apply for and some niche type jobs you wouldnt think of. Are you active on linkedin? If you are not already doing so I'd link to any school friend etc and see if they have any ideas. I keep hearing of types of work you would never search for without someone mentioning it first.

What career paths have you considered? What are your barriers to moving away from home if you stay in London? A rental deposit (?£800) plus a months rent - say £700? And a job which could support this?
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Sam A
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Wow, awesome.

Good point I am not on linkedIn at all, I reckoned that I don't really have any advanced skills to offer or specialities if you know what i mean so I haven't made one yet. The linking to school friends thing though sounds like a good idea...if that can happen over linkedIn then it might be a good next step.

I've considered like most Psychology graduates a career in Psychology, but with a 2:2 i'm understanding academic/psychologist type careers are not recommended. I even considered doing my BSc again...but unless I move out will probably get the same grade again. Thought about going in to counselling first(diploma), then undergoing a masters to 'show i can handle research' then apply for a doctorate in counselling/clinical psychology.
(Original post by ajj2000)
What are your barriers to moving away from home if you stay in London? A rental deposit (?£800) plus a months rent - say £700? And a job which could support this?
The main issue right now I guess is even giving a commitment to a job when I don't have a stable sleeping place...are you suggesting to ride it out with sleep deprivation for like 2 months till I save a deposit and a month of rent, then finally have my own room to work on a career? This really does seem like the best option rn to be open with you.
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Sam A
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I like your can do attitude @itsmith

This is the second time coding has come up so sounds like something I might have to look into.

Have you had any success with coding or do you know of anyone who has made a career from coding allowing them to live independently?

The Portfolio thing makes a lot of sense too...it's proof of your ability...who can deny that.

Thanks a lot!
(Original post by ltsmith)
why should a worthless piece of paper dictate your life?

yes you probably won't be able to get into grad schemes but there's more ways to succeed than getting onto a grad scheme.

if you learn to code and you have an impressive portfolio, you can earn lots and employers will look over the piece of paper.

heck there was even a kid who got onto graduate entry medicine with a 3rd. yes a bloody 3rd! he goes to swansea med school.
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TrojanH
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(Original post by Sam A)
Thanks for your reply Trojan.

Hr and social work make sense .If you really don't need a degree then it makes sense that a 2:2 shouldn't be an issue.

Coding is new though...have you found it to be a good way to make a living/know anyone who has made it work? If you haven't that's fine, I am still interested to hear why you think coding would be good.

Cheers
All good man

You could even get a masters in whatever you wanted

Tbh money is good but I know that after a certain point your life isn’t gonna change very much, I think most studies show it’s like 4-50k, at least up north. I would look into whatever you actually want to wake up and look forward to

I love coding I get to build things and help people. It’s difficult in only you have to spend your life at a desk - if you can’t manage to sit at your computer for 8 hours a day then I’d look elsewhere, but there are plenty of meaningful careers out there.

I’d also look into teaching whatever you wanted- I applied on a whim to those graduate teacher jobs in Dubai and China and I got offers back within three days, really exciting stuff as well.

Honestly it is really hard to find a job but if you make your job finding a job you should be able to at least get interviews if not offers in less than a month. At most 3 months if you work non stop and get really unlucky

Also best times are April summer, when companies are doing their budget and hiring most
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Sam A
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Itsmith thanks for your advice, really appreciate it...

Will give coding a good look and visit the reddit you provided if i have further questions.

Sounds really good,

All the best on your CS journey...do let me know if there is somewhere I could follow your journey...

Cheers
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Sam A
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@ TrojanH

Ahh, you said it right here:

(Original post by TrojanH)
Honestly it is really hard to find a job but if you make your job finding a job you should be able to at least get interviews if not offers in less than a month. At most 3 months if you work non stop and get really unlucky
Appreciate the advice, so useful.

Coding sounds really good. Glad to hear you are doing something you enjoy.

And yeah teaching abroad is an option...3 days is really quick...that's shocking.

Some good stuff, appreciate it.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Sam A)
Wow, awesome.

Good point I am not on linkedIn at all, I reckoned that I don't really have any advanced skills to offer or specialities if you know what i mean so I haven't made one yet. The linking to school friends thing though sounds like a good idea...if that can happen over linkedIn then it might be a good next step.


The main issue right now I guess is even giving a commitment to a job when I don't have a stable sleeping place...are you suggesting to ride it out with sleep deprivation for like 2 months till I save a deposit and a month of rent, then finally have my own room to work on a career? This really does seem like the best option rn to be open with you.
With linkedin I think its really worth signing up and linking to people (regardless of skills) as you get a great feel for what people are doing - maybe something seems interesting? You have a contact who may be able to give you advice. How about checking what 50 of your coursemates are doing now and see if they have any advice?

Regarding accommodation I'm a bit stuck. I think toughing out 2 months might be the only way to go. You need to be able to get sleep to work and develop a career.
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Sam A
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Thanks, that's awesome.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Sam A)
Thanks, that's awesome.
How are you getting on?
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Sam A
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Thanks for asking AJJ, I'm currently working on a website. It's something I can do regardless of the whole lack of having my 'own space to sleep' thing. The natural challenges that come with self-employment e.g. staying focused, avoiding procrastination, time management are what I am dealing with now.

The LinkedIn advice you gave me has been pretty useful too, was on it the past few days researching contacts and that kind of thing. It's pretty amazing actually, it opens your mind to more possibilities. So still working on a professional career on the side. If only I could manage my time like Elon Musk.

Would like to hear about you too, might ask on one of your other threads somewhere...
(Original post by ajj2000)
How are you getting on?
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Clazzlefish
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Hey! Sorry to hear about your situation; but glad to see you are still trying to push through this! If i was you I wouldn't feel too bad about achieving a 2:2 degree in Psychology - at the end of the day it is still a great achievement and you have a degree, which some don't have at all!

You mentioned originally about potentially doing a Master's in clinical psychology/ or the counselling route? This could still be an option for you if you really wanted as there are uni's which offer places to those with a 2:2 degree, it would mostly be about selling yourself in your personal statement - showing that you have both the potential and the ability to cope with master's level (I feel like im making it sound scary - its honestly not too much different from undergrad as i'm doing an MSc forensic psychology atm!). If you are able to delegate your time effectively in self-employment this could also go into your application showing that your ability to independently work and time management for example. This could also potentially help you with your living situation as you would also have the option for moving to the uni (depending how far it was from where you currently live) & you have the addition of student finance to help you along.
Also if i'm not mistaken, you can apply for jobs as a therapist holding only a psychology degree! It would primarily be as a talking therapist where you would be allowing people to talk through their problems without giving them advice (so asking them how situations made them feel, rather than giving feedback on what they should do, as you would need additional training for this!). But this again could be an option as i think the starting wage is around £20k - but may be higher as you're based around London . There is the other options of volunteer work whilst also completing your website, this would be great experience for you and would mean you could leave if you felt your lack of sleep was getting in the way at any point!
The great thing about psychology as a discipline however, is just how diverse it is, so dont feel like you only have to go onto further education etc; there are many areas that would value your ability to research (which is a great skill learnt as part of the degree!) including business etc! So dont limit yourself Sorry for the super huge reply but hope this helps just a little!
(Original post by Sam A)
Hi there, If you are a 2:2 graduate who has managed to make things work, move out of their parents house and live independently (without benefits) please advise me.

Graduated a few years ago with a 2:2 in Psychology. Still living in parents house and now jobless. I live in the living room and can't even make commitment to a Job because I can only sleep when everyone else has going to sleep which is sometimes is as late as 3am.

Tried to ride it out before and work while in this situation but my brain started to break down and I would constantly forget and misplace important things at work. It's only when I finally stopped working that I realised that it is the lack of sleep that was affecting my functioning.

Should i just focus on something I can do during the inconsistent hours that I am awake (like running a website)? Please give me some advice guys, if you got a 2:2, how did you manage to make things work and move out? If you are in a similar situation, feel free to share your story also.

Cheers
(Original post by Sam A)
Thanks for asking AJJ, I'm currently working on a website. It's something I can do regardless of the whole lack of having my 'own space to sleep' thing. The natural challenges that come with self-employment e.g. staying focused, avoiding procrastination, time management are what I am dealing with now.

The LinkedIn advice you gave me has been pretty useful too, was on it the past few days researching contacts and that kind of thing. It's pretty amazing actually, it opens your mind to more possibilities. So still working on a professional career on the side. If only I could manage my time like Elon Musk.

Would like to hear about you too, might ask on one of your other threads somewhere...
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Realitysreflexx
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Fix your sleep schedule (stop making excuses), try and get into a masters with your 2:2 and fix your qualifications. Might need to get job to help you save since you will need to self fund.

Or get on a teaching scheme.

Generally stop feeling sorry for yourself, your a university educated person....start acting like you've read for a degree.

They did award you one, so obviously you have some capacity. A 2:2 still makes you smarter then alot of the rest of the population. And only about 6-8% globally even has a degree. Let's stop the pity party and start living life.
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Sam A
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Clazzlefish

Wow appreciate the advice....the length is great, more to read.

Forensic Psychology...sounds awesome, it's amazing that you've actually progressed past your degree and found an area to 'specialise' in.

So much beautiful advice, going to re-read it, thanks again.
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Sam A
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Realitysreflexx

Thanks for taking the time to write your advice. And wow 22 badges...quite the experienced one your are.

How is your situation going? Would love a brief background of where you are at or what your background (academic/working) is like.

Cheers.
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Realitysreflexx
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I'm a mature student at Nottingham uni, and have experience in real estate, am a landlord with 9 tenants and am working towards a management bsc to be followed by a master's degree if all goes to plan. As a German-American i don't much believe in giving up.

So sorry if my message came across harsh but some tough love is common in those cultures. Defeatist attiudes end in defeat. Only with realistic pragmatism and determination can goals be achieved.
(Original post by Sam A)
Realitysreflexx

Thanks for taking the time to write your advice. And wow 22 badges...quite the experienced one your are.

How is your situation going? Would love a brief background of where you are at or what your background (academic/working) is like.

Cheers.
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