Is it a good idea to learn your essays? Watch

flopsypopsy1
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Is it a good idea to write five essays, for example Key Scene, Character, Setting, Plot and Theme, turn them in to your teacher to get them marked and learn them for the final exam?

Or is it better to just be familiar with essays and structure, but go in without a prepared answer.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by flopsypopsy1)
Is it a good idea to write five essays, for example Key Scene, Character, Setting, Plot and Theme, turn them in to your teacher to get them marked and learn them for the final exam?

Or is it better to just be familiar with essays and structure, but go in without a prepared answer.
Don't learn them. Because then you'll write out that pre prepped answer and it won't actually answer the exam question and you'll get zero marks.
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scottishst25
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I’m guessing this is for higher English? I wouldn’t just try to memorise a few likely questions and hope for the best as if the questions aren’t exactly what you wanted you could end up writing an essay that doesn’t link properly to the question. I’d say work on learning quotes and structures would be a better way to go so you’re better prepared for any question.
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jasontesfaye
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At Nat 5 it’s fine. The questions are broader so it’s easy to make the one essay fit multiple questions.

At Higher it’s much harder (I learned this last year). I memorised the one essay and failed. I wouldn’t really recommend it at Higher. But if you’re really struggling you could maybe just try memorise one, but also learn a few additional quotes etc just as a backup (but don’t complain if your question doesn’t come up in the exam if you do this).
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alan55
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You can write essays and then just read them a few times. It worked for me once. I asked for help professionals from one writing service and they did all work at the highest level. I checked reviews about best services on PapersBattle.com to fnd the reliable one. p.s. I got A from my exam.
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flopsypopsy1
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Probably should have clarified that I'm at Nat 5 Level. English is my best subject, but I do badly in essays and I'm desperate to get a good mark as i dont have much faith in my portfolio.
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MarthaH123
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What I do is write essay plans for as many themes and characters as I can then learn these with quotes and points. This way you should have lots of information, but it's not too tied down to a specific question, then in the exam you can USE this information to help you plan the actual question, but it doesn't take as long as trying to think of everything on the spot. But don't learn whole chunks of pre-written essays, the examiner will be able to tell that you're not really thinking about your answer.
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Labrador99
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(Original post by flopsypopsy1)
Is it a good idea to write five essays, for example Key Scene, Character, Setting, Plot and Theme, turn them in to your teacher to get them marked and learn them for the final exam?

Or is it better to just be familiar with essays and structure, but go in without a prepared answer.
Memorising essays is a risk- the exact ones you learned could come up- but could not.

I'd suggest that it's sensible to have practised all these types of essays (either though writing them fully or just doing detailed plans), and I found it useful to have a structure that I followed- but with different content depending on the question asked. MarthaH123 has given some great advice
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LeapingLucy
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The danger is that a question comes up that is similar, but not exactly the same as the one you've learnt - and you then just parrot out the one you know but don't actually answer the question being asked.
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ajadamd
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it depends what book you’re doing. for example, i wrote detailed plans for OMAM essay answers as every answer was incredibly similar, most of them using the same characters and quotes while just tweaking what you say it represents - came out with full marks and a*

however, for some books this may not work. for example, for heroes there are 10+ possible themes (though it may be possible to learn characters). i’d say base it on how many themes/characters there are. if there are too many just learn the book inside out and know how to structure
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Lil Impulse
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Just memorise your essay and adapt it to the question. All you really need to change for a question is the introduction, topic sentences and conclusion.
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