Moving to from the UK to study at a University in the US.

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
want to become a singer and would love to study singing at university in the US. I don't know what state is the best place to make it in the music industry and need some help with that. I would preferably like to study in a state that is quite hot because that would benefit my health. I have looked at places such as los Angeles and nashville but neither of them seem to be that safe. I also don't want to go to a university that is too posh or expensive because I would have to get a student loan and don't want to be in debt for ages afterward. Also I wouldn't fit in in a crowd full of posh people and would I have to take SATS to apply to a US University? Its all a lot to ask but if anyone has any advice that would be great
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
A few points

a) it's the SAT (singular) not SATs (plural). The latter is a UK test administered to younger students, the former is the most common admissions test for US colleges (in the US college and university are synonymous, for the most part; university normally refers only to larger research oriented institutions which offer undergrad courses, whereas college refers to any HE institution generally). You can take the ACT instead of the SAT if you wish, which is similar but with a slightly different structure. You may need to take SAT subject tests regardless of whether you take the SAT or ACT, depending where you apply. There are a handful of SAT optional colleges, but they are few and far between and none are need-blind to my knowledge (maybe Bowdoin...?)

b) unless you are a US citizen, you won't be eligible for student loans in the US. Student Finance England does not fund study outside of the UK except where it is an integrated part of a degree taught by a UK HE provider (i.e. a course with a year abroad), and the US loans aren't open to international students. You would only get funding from the university directly, either in the form of a scholarship, which will normally be sports based (i.e. you will need to be at least county level in a sport now) or extremely competitive, or directly if the university is "need-blind". Only the "top" universities in the US (e.g. Harvard and it's ilk) are need-blind and essentially pay the way for students.

c) none of America is "safe" compared to the UK, half the states have open carry or concealed carry laws...

d) most people successful in the US music industry did not get there by studying at university, nor for that matter by talent; it's a question of connections and already being involved. Hence the very successful Disney/Nickelodeon -> music star (and sometimes hence "actor") pipeline as in the case of e.g. Ariana Grande, Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake, Miley Cyrus etc.

I think you need to do a lot of research before making any firm plans to apply to the US. It's a very different system, and has some serious financial implications following from b) above, unless you are applying to a "top" university. I would note there though, that Harvard (similar to it's main competitors) had an acceptance rate of ~5% in each of the last 5 years or so. Cambridge by comparison had an average success rate of application, across all its courses, of ~20% each year in the same period. It's much harder to get into a "top" US college than a "top" UK university, even before you consider the differences in application (you cannot merely be excellent in your proposed subject area in the US, you need to be an "all-rounder", whereas in the UK as long as you are good at your subject, they don't really care about other stuff except grades).
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 year ago
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I would note there though, that Harvard (similar to it's main competitors) had an acceptance rate of ~5% in each of the last 5 years or so. Cambridge by comparison had an average success rate of application, across all its courses, of ~20% each year in the same period. It's much harder to get into a "top" US college than a "top" UK university, even before you consider the differences in application (you cannot merely be excellent in your proposed subject area in the US, you need to be an "all-rounder", whereas in the UK as long as you are good at your subject, they don't really care about other stuff except grades).
In terms of the statistics, it's not harder to get into a top university. You can apply to every Ivy League university, but can't (typically) apply to both Oxford and Cambridge. The lack of a restriction on the number of applications explains the low offer rate, IMO. I agree with your"all-rounder" comment - admissions criteria are very different from the UK.

The OP's biggest issue is funding, IMO.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 1 year ago
0
reply
Molseh
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
Austin, Texas. Hot, Safe, Liberal. No idea about universities or "singing" degrees though.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (54)
29.51%
No - I have already returned home (23)
12.57%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (42)
22.95%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (16)
8.74%
No - I live at home during term anyway (48)
26.23%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed