International student studying law - Training Contracts Watch

LawPotato
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Looking for other international students (studying or studied law) who have secured training contracts!

I am currently studying law in the UK and I am exploring whatever career options I can
To my knowledge it is incredibly difficult to secure TCs here? Even worse for international students?

I would greatly appreciate it if there was an international student who secured a TC willing to share their experience (especially with visa applications)
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LawPotato
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LawPotato
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For working
I’m current on a tier4 study visa in Durham.
(Original post by J-SP)
Visa applications for studying or for working?
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username2950448
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It's tough because employers have to justify you taking the post of a Brit, but very possible if you are good enough.

Also, I don't know how the visa quota system is going lately, but I had some non-EU friends with TCs (etc) that couldn't get into the UK to start working for around 6 months because the system required them to re-apply every month but the quota only let in those earning £50,000-£55,000+ (which virtually no graduate trainee earns in Y1, other than the two trainees at Davis Polk).
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username2950448
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(Original post by J-SP)
The quota only applies if you are not being transferred from a tier 4 visa. Same for the RLMT.
Perhaps they couldn't transfer directly from T4 to T2 because they left the UK for a while before starting(?) but I'm not sure.

I remember the quota got up to like £55,000 at one point, insane.
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username2950448
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(Original post by J-SP)
Yeah went higher than that. Doesn’t help when loads of graduate programmes start at the same time in Aug/September.

It’s why non EU students need to ensure they secure a TC before they graduate - makes the visa process a lot easier, mainly just cost for employers.
They did secure their TC prior to graduating to be fair. Another problem was that people who were rejected one month would just re-apply the next month (and the next...) adding more people and meaning the quota kept being exceeded each month (for something like 6 consecutive months at the time I think).
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LawPotato
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(Original post by J-SP)
The visa process is with the employer. Candidates only see part of it.

What do you need to know about it?
Hi thanks for the reply

I don’t have a specific question because I know close to nothing about it. Could you please break down the process for me? It’s quite a hassle even applying for the tier4 visa from my country and I imagine a work visa will be more complicated.
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LawPotato
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Oh I see, that clears up some worries for me.

As for your earlier comment on why firms won't let international students have a timeout, could you kindly elaborate on this? I am currently on the LLB in Durham and it seems to lack international presence, hoping to get some time out to get a masters at a more internationally known uni after undergrad, is this advisable? Is it possible for firms give out delayed TCs as in that you start 2-3 years later after graduation (so you can complete the LPC and Masters).

And I hope you don't mind me asking one final question, what would you say is the biggest mistake international students make in their applications?
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LawPotato
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Thanks for all the information and I definitely do need to do more research, will asking a lot more questions in the next law careers fair.
(Original post by J-SP)
If you are on a masters in the UK, your student visa will continue.

To make the visa easier, if you are transferring your tier 4 to a tier 2, it is far less complicated. However if your student visa expires before you get a tier 2, the process is far more complicated.

International students are not the same people. They make a complete range of mistakes, the exact same ones as UK students.

Durham is a highly targeted university. If you are looking to work in the UK, there is absolutely no issue of Durham reputation.

You need to do some more research. Most firms who sponsor work permits recruit law students ahead of them doing the LPC. You can sometimes get a deferred offer if you state you want to do a masters, but fewer firms will do that.
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LawPotato
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I'm studying foundation law at DurhamUni's International Study Centre with a fulfilled conditional offer so pre-fresh? I had some seniors tell me to do some research before first year but ifoundation students don't have full access to the careers centre (since we are geographically isolated in Stockton) so I resorted to coming to TSR.
(Original post by J-SP)
That’s going to be too late.

Guessing you are a first year?
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LawPotato
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That is comforting to hear I understand Durham has an excellent reputation nationally.

I was just worried about immigration due everything I've been reading in politics in general. I wanted to get a clear idea of the visa process to be prepared. Apart from that there seems to be quite a wealth of information on law firm applications, it's just a matter of actually working hard (and smart) for it now I suppose.

I really appreciate all this information you've given.
(Original post by J-SP)
Ok. You’re not even started your degree. Plenty of time to worry about all of this.

You’ve probably got a skewed view of Durham if you are in Stockton. You will have plenty of opportunities at Durham - most large commercial firms will do some form of campus event up there
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username2950448
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(Original post by J-SP)
The quota only applies if you are not being transferred from a tier 4 visa. Same for the RLMT.
Random question (out of interest): how big of an obstacle is the visa process (more specifically, the requirement to get a visa) for non-EEA students/graduates seeking internships in big companies in London? Is it harder for non-EEA students to get an internship visa than it would be for just a full-time job? Thanks
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username2950448
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(Original post by J-SP)
Depends if they are on a student visa or not. If they are on student visa, they won’t need an internship visa as they can work on their student visa as long as it is outside of term time.

If they do need a visa, then they will need to find an employer who has a licence for Tier 5 visa. Tier 5 is typically applied to longer placements though, so the tricky part for law is they rely on very short placements (1-4 weeks) and then they can’t justify the cost or process needed.

I’ve only done it twice in my career and that was for students where there was a strategic objective to recruit them from their home country in the hope they would get training/experience in London and then return to work in their home country where operations were fairly new and growing.
Thank you!
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