motivatedmadman
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cant find anything other than from the US which isnt relevant. could you also let me know what the salaries are out of curiosity- thanks
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ecolier
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(Original post by ljerin1)
cant find anything other than from the US which isnt relevant. could you also let me know what the salaries are out of curiosity- thanks
Salary of what? All NHS consultants are paid the same regardless of specialty The starting is around £77,000 per year.

Private work is based on supply and demand.
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motivatedmadman
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(Original post by ecolier)
Salary of what? All NHS consultants are paid the same regardless of specialty The starting is around £77,000 per year.
any occupation/ jobs from studying those subjects at university. thanks
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ecolier
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(Original post by ljerin1)
any occupation/ jobs from studying those subjects at university. thanks
A lot of these jobs are based on supply and demand though. Obviously if you made it as a world-class, Nobel-prize-winning biomedical scientist your salary will be in the hundreds of thousands if not millions, otherwise it will not be as high. It also depends on your seniority and where you work.

I am training to be a medical consultant so I can only provide information on the pay of doctors. This (https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media...018-270918.pdf) is the salary for all NHS doctors including those in training (page 6) and consultants (page 11).
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motivatedmadman
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(Original post by ecolier)
A lot of these jobs are based on supply and demand though. Obviously if you made it as a world-class, Nobel-prize-winning biomedical scientist your salary will be in the hundreds of thousands if not millions, otherwise it will not be as high. It also depends on your seniority and where you work.

I am training to be a medical consultant so I can only provide information on the pay of doctors. This (https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media...018-270918.pdf) is the salary for all NHS doctors including those in training (page 6) and consultants (page 11).
thank you so much x
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motivatedmadman
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(Original post by ecolier)
Indeed, so, so many things have changed in the meantime that this is simply not information relevant to the OP.

Remember that MMC made sure that trainees are no longer "stuck" being SHOs, registrars and senior registrars so the average age of starting consultants would have gone down a lot since 2005. Also the "average" NHS consultant salary in the 2003/04 article is actually less than the starting these days (£77,913).
What motivated/ inspired you to become a medical consultant/ doctor?
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username3460126
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(Original post by ecolier)
A lot of these jobs are based on supply and demand though. Obviously if you made it as a world-class, Nobel-prize-winning biomedical scientist your salary will be in the hundreds of thousands if not millions, otherwise it will not be as high. It also depends on your seniority and where you work.

I am training to be a medical consultant so I can only provide information on the pay of doctors. This (https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media...018-270918.pdf) is the salary for all NHS doctors including those in training (page 6) and consultants (page 11).
Oh wow, what speciality if you dont mind me asking?
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ecolier
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(Original post by ltsmith)
....
In the last 16 years, a lot of medical specialties and procedures have evolved and include many hands-on procedures - e.g. cardiologists, interventional radiologists.

These are all taking private work from surgeons when increasing it for themselves. There really are lots of factors involved in how much each specialty earns, and many things have changed in the last one and a half decade.

(Original post by ljerin1)
What motivated/ inspired you to become a medical consultant/ doctor?
Can't remember, it was so long ago! Make sure you read "The man who mistook his wife for a hat" and "Phantoms in the brain".

(Original post by FloralPrints)
Oh wow, what speciality if you dont mind me asking?
Neurology
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by ecolier)
Indeed, so, so many things have changed in the meantime that this is simply not information relevant to the OP.

Remember that MMC made sure that trainees are no longer "stuck" being SHOs, registrars and senior registrars so the average age of starting consultants would have gone down a lot since 2005. Also the "average" NHS consultant salary in the 2003/04 article is actually less than the starting these days (£77,913).
I'd say it's still probably helpful given that there are no more recent papers on the topic. It's the only source I can find online comparing private practice incomes for the various specialties in the UK. And given there are significant differences between specialties, I'd say it's useful information.

Is it not fairly reasonable to assume that the high earning specialties in 2003 are probably still the high earning specialties now?
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username3460126
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(Original post by ecolier)
Neurology
OooOo That sounds very exciting and interesting, all the best! xxx
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U33B
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Why would you study medicine purely for financial reasons?. There are other jobs which are equal to if not more than a doctor`s salary. You should be studying medicine to help people and improve a persons quality of life not improve the quality of your bank balance. However doctors do get paid a lot and rightfully so. In fact i`m of the opinion that doctors should get paid more than actors and sports personalities. All medical staff of different fields of medicine and allied health professions work tirelessly to save lives. However yes salary is a concern bearing in mind NHS workers are underpaid over worked. You should check out the pay scale of NHS on their website. Private like anything you will make more because you do private stuff out of normal working hours unless private is your full time job. I`m not having a go at you because everyone is concerned about their wages, given the fact that we`re living under this terrible government. But that isn`t much of a concern to medical professionals compared to the long working hours and working conditions that they are contracted to do.
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