AMA: I only got 1A* at GCSE and I got into Law and Anthropology at LSE Watch

issshhhhh789
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Just as above ^^

GCSE': 1A*, 6As and 2Bs

Predicted A - Levels: AAA

Course requirements: AAB
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ibyghee
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I got into uni of manchester to study masters in physics(Mphys) with just an 8, 2 As the rest Bs at GCSE.
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Not to burst your bubble but you don’t need good GCSEs to do that. Only Oxbridge really care about your GCSEs so you would have got in with all C’s or B’s at GCSE as long as you get A levels of AAB.
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not to burst your bubble but you don’t need good GCSEs to do that. Only Oxbridge really care about your GCSEs so you would have got in with all C’s or B’s at GCSE as long as you get A levels of AAB.
Yes you do. It's LSE not Manchester Metropolitan.

UCAS data has revealed that LSE is the university with the most applicants in the UK, followed closely by Scottish rivals Edinburgh and St. Andrews. Of the 17,660 students who applied to the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2016, only 1,615 managed to secure a place.27 Jun 2017

9% acceptance rate for LSE
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Congratulations on that
(Original post by ibyghee)
I got into uni of manchester to study masters in physics(Mphys) with just an 8, 2 As the rest Bs at GCSE.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not to burst your bubble but you don’t need good GCSEs to do that. Only Oxbridge really care about your GCSEs so you would have got in with all C’s or B’s at GCSE as long as you get A levels of AAB.
LSE is a bit weird with GCSEs. They always give a reason for rejection when they send out rejection emails, and every year, GCSEs not being good enough is the reason cited in a lot of emails. People with better GCSEs than the OP have been rejected on the basis of their GCSEs.

But they're also clearly willing to overlook low GCSEs if they really like another aspect of your application (especially your personal statement) and see potential, as the OP's case demonstrates.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yes you do. It's LSE not Manchester Metropolitan.

UCAS data has revealed that LSE is the university with the most applicants in the UK, followed closely by Scottish rivals Edinburgh and St. Andrews. Of the 17,660 students who applied to the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2016, only 1,615 managed to secure a place.27 Jun 2017

9% acceptance rate for LSE
1) Acceptance rate statistics are highly misleading - they only include people who actually enrol at a particular university. Plenty of people will have received an offer, but then chosen to decline it. Acceptance rates do not give you an accurate sense of how competitive a university is - for that you need to look at the offer rates.

There are only about 1600 undergraduate places at LSE each year, but they significantly over offer, making around 4500 offers every year.

So in 2017, when they received about 20,000 applications & made 4500 offers, the offer rate was 22.5%. Still low, but nowhere near 9%.


2) There's no way that LSE is the university with the most applicants in the UK. It's a tiny university that only offers a very limited range of subjects. The universities with the most applicants will be ones like Birmingham or Manchester, which I'm sure receives 50,000+ applications per year (people with great grades apply to use it as an insurance, people with less good grades apply as an aspirational choice).

LSE may well be the university with the most applicants per place, that's true. But certainly not the most applicants. And it only has the former title because people aren't allowed to apply to both Oxford and Cambridge, so it artificially doubles the acceptance rate.
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Anonymous #3
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Hypothetically: the course makes 27 offers and has room for 13 people.

If everyone met their offer on results day, would LSE start cutting people with the lowest grades or read over the UCAS application again
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
1) Acceptance rate statistics are highly misleading - they only include people who actually enrol at a particular university. Plenty of people will have received an offer, but then chosen to decline it. Acceptance rates do not give you an accurate sense of how competitive a university is - for that you need to look at the offer rates.

There are only about 1600 undergraduate places at LSE each year, but they significantly over offer, making around 4500 offers every year.

So in 2017, when they received about 20,000 applications & made 4500 offers, the offer rate was 22.5%. Still low, but nowhere near 9%.


2) There's no way that LSE is the university with the most applicants in the UK. It's a tiny university that only offers a very limited range of subjects. The universities with the most applicants will be ones like Birmingham or Manchester, which I'm sure receives 50,000+ applications per year (people with great grades apply to use it as an insurance, people with less good grades apply as an aspirational choice).

LSE may well be the university with the most applicants per place, that's true. But certainly not the most applicants. And it only has the former title because people aren't allowed to apply to both Oxford and Cambridge, so it artificially doubles the acceptance rate.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hypothetically: the course makes 27 offers and has room for 13 people.

If everyone met their offer on results day, would LSE start cutting people with the lowest grades or read over the UCAS application again
1) Well firstly, it's highly unlikely that all 27 offer holders would have firmed the offer - several are likely to have Oxbridge offers that they obviously favour, others may have decided they'd rather go somewhere like Bristol/Durham rather than a London uni, others may be internationals who ultimately decide not to go to university in the UK. It's unlikely that more than 20 people would ultimately decide to firm the offer.

2) If LSE make you an offer and you firm/insurance it and get the grades necessary, they have to take you. They're not allowed to cut people or review the application process - the UCAS rules completely forbid it. Once you firm/insure an offer, it indicates a contract between you and the university that they have to honour.

3) Universities do from time to time end up with more students than they were anticipating - they just have to absorb them and try to be more careful next year.
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mahtyldo
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Hi I really want to apply for this exact course I do you have any suggestions, I have the same GCSEs but I am predicted A*AB
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Rightongg
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To the OP, did you get a contextual offer?
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Connor27
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Which halls do you intend to pick?
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Anonymous #4
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Law and Anthro is poly. The seminars I shared at LSE with the Law and Anthro students... jesus. They were embarrassing.
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Connor27
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Law and Anthro is poly. The seminars I shared at LSE with the Law and Anthro students... jesus. They were embarrassing.
If you were an actual LSE student you’d call classes classes, and not seminars.
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Anonymous #4
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(Original post by Connor27)
If you were an actual LSE student you’d call classes classes, and not seminars.
Sad news mate. I am. As a law student, I always like to have authority to my comments, so here is a little snippet from the LLB Options book for 2019/2020:

Attachment 830900

Best of luck at the high-street firms.
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Connor27
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sad news mate. I am. As a law student, I always like to have authority to my comments, so here is a little snippet from the LLB Options book for 2019/2020:

Attachment 830900

Best of luck at the high-street firms.
The only programmes that use the word “seminar” are masters/postgrad programmes.
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