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    I have a cousin of mine that takes the IGCSE and I have had so many arguments and trying to convince him that it's exactly the same as GCSE, but only adding the 'International' before the GCSE. But he won't get it through his head?

    So, I thought I would like people to advice me precisely tell me the difference, if any, between the IGCSE AND GCSE?

    Thanks
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    i was always under the impression that the IGCSE is far harder. but i don't understand why it would be
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    GCSE's contain a coursework component. IGCSE's a purely exam based.
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    IGCSE is aimed at students worldwide.

    With GCSE there is often reference to things only those who live in Britain would know about. The IGCSE makes the examination process fairer for students as it focuses on topics that do not need the background knowledge that students doing GCSE are meant to know.

    In IGCSE case studies are used alot. I don't know if that's the same in the GCSE. The case studies allow students to explore how people live, work and get by throughout the world and that is what alot of the exams focus on!
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    Yeah, the IGCSE is supposed to be harder than GCSE.
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    (Original post by Emmalouise1990)
    GCSE's contain a coursework component. IGCSE's a purely exam based.

    So in other words is it harder, because my cousin always says "its much harder" and I always try to explain to him that its not.

    REALLY CONFUSING STUFF!!!

    P.s: so there is no coursework what so ever in the IGCSE courses!!!
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    My teachers told me that IGCSEs are much more specific and the mark-schemes are very precise, so it really pays to know the facts, whereas GCSEs, you can waffle and still pick up a lot of marks.

    I do IGCSEs so I can't comment on GCSEs but this is what my teachers say...

    And yeah as Emmalouise said, IGCSEs have no coursework, but a practical paper instead, which I prefer, coz they are usually quite easy
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    How does your cousin know it's harder?

    I study geography through the IGCSE program and I don't know if it's harder. If it's an consolation, our geography teacher who has taught both IGCSE and GCSE says that theres barely nothing in it ...

    The whole thing about it being easier with coursework is purely an opinion. Exams sometime suite people better than coursework and vice-versa!
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    To be honest the amount of debate that goes on between me and him are ridiculous.

    However, its good to know that there is a minor difference in terms of no coursework and also IS HARDER?? mmm , i guess a lost that battle than?

    Thanks for your replies guys!!!
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    Unfortunately your cousin is correct; they're not exactly the same. :p: They offer similar courses to regular GCSE ones (for example Maths, French, Physics etc), however, they are only really offered by Edexcel, unlike regular GCSEs which you can take with Edexcel, OCR, AQA, WJEC and CCEA. You're right in that IGCSEs are international, meaning you can take them worldwide. However, even in subjects which are common to both GCSE and IGCSE, such as Maths, the papers and syllabuses can vary quite dramatically.

    The only reason they share the "GCSE" element in their names is that students would generally sit them at the same point in their education, i.e. at the end of compulsory secondary school, as opposed to them being similar qualifications which can be compared like for like.
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    They are integrating IGCSE's into some schools now (mainly private schools), as a lot of students are getting A/A* in the current GCSE's. Seems bizzare to me that they are making them more difficult, but I guess they want to lower the numbers of people achieving such high grades.
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    IGCSE is a lot harder. I did IGCSE for all my subjects, and I remember looking at a GCSE maths paper and laughing because it was so much easier than what I had to do. So in other words, your cousin is right
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    The thing is, if someone is good at Geography, they are bound to get a good grade with revision and dedication throughout their course.

    Regardless of if it's IGCSE or GCSE they are still most probably going to do well in the end.

    I have to admit though, I prefer the extra exam paper as opposed to some more coursework at the top of my ever-growing pile!
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    Question: Do you, as a GCSE student, do any calculus or extensive organic chemistry in mathematics and chemistry respectively?
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    (Original post by suuuuuuseh)
    Unfortunately your cousin is correct; they're not exactly the same. :p: They offer similar courses to regular GCSE ones (for example Maths, French, Physics etc), however, they are only really offered by Edexcel, unlike regular GCSEs which you can take with Edexcel, OCR, AQA, WJEC and CCEA. You're right in that IGCSEs are international, meaning you can take them worldwide. However, even in subjects which are common to both GCSE and IGCSE, such as Maths, the papers and syllabuses can vary quite dramatically.

    The only reason they share the "GCSE" element in their names is that students would generally sit them at the same point in their education, i.e. at the end of compulsory secondary school, as opposed to them being similar qualifications which can be compared like for like.
    Will uni's view them as the same, or will they take into account that IGCSEs are 'harder'?
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    (Original post by suuuuuuseh)
    Unfortunately your cousin is correct; they're not exactly the same. :p: They offer similar courses to regular GCSE ones (for example Maths, French, Physics etc), however, they are only really offered by Edexcel, unlike regular GCSEs which you can take with Edexcel, OCR, AQA, WJEC and CCEA. You're right in that IGCSEs are international, meaning you can take them worldwide. However, even in subjects which are common to both GCSE and IGCSE, such as Maths, the papers and syllabuses can vary quite dramatically.

    The only reason they share the "GCSE" element in their names is that students would generally sit them at the same point in their education, i.e. at the end of compulsory secondary school, as opposed to them being similar qualifications which can be compared like for like.
    Yep, He did mention that the syllables was different and quite harder. But, I still can't get to grips in why though? ok, I understand the subject on it being International, but, wasn't it in this country that the name was given and the UK and America were the people who made the 'GCSE' as a secondary education and the rest of the world followed and copied (not precisely) , but still copied the education system.

    So, in terms of toughness HERE should be harder???

    TO BE HONEST??? I'm on MARS!!!
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    (Original post by player2704)
    Yep, He did mention that the syllables was different and quite harder. But, I still can't get to grips in why though? ok, I understand the subject on it being International, but, wasn't it in this country that the name was given and the UK and America were the people who made the 'GCSE' as a secondary education and the rest of the world followed and copied (not precisely) , but still copied the education system.

    So, in terms of toughness HERE should be harder???

    TO BE HONEST??? I'm on MARS!!!
    Try going to a former colony, India for example, and attempting their secondary school examinations.

    Fifty or sixty years ago, it might've held true, but secondary school examinations in the UK have definitely become easier. By easier, I mean the specifications have become narrower and shallower. Compare some of the older O-Level exams with GCSEs...

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    The Igcse For Sciences Is Much More Indepth And Goes Into Alot More Detail Than Gcse- In Gcse Science There Are Alot Of Compreshension Exercsises Too.

    The Igcse Chemistry Is 3/4 Of The Course For As Level Our Teacher Assures Us.
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    (Original post by simcard2007)
    The Igcse For Sciences Is Much More Indepth And Goes Into Alot More Detail Than Gcse- In Gcse Science There Are Alot Of Compreshension Exercsises Too.

    The Igcse Chemistry Is 3/4 Of The Course For As Level Our Teacher Assures Us.
    I'd agree. I covered most of the AS organic chemistry at IGSCE and therefore found AS chemistry to be a proverbial walk in the park.
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    (Original post by suuuuuuseh)
    Unfortunately your cousin is correct; they're not exactly the same. :p: They offer similar courses to regular GCSE ones (for example Maths, French, Physics etc), however, they are only really offered by Edexcel, unlike regular GCSEs which you can take with Edexcel, OCR, AQA, WJEC and CCEA. You're right in that IGCSEs are international, meaning you can take them worldwide. However, even in subjects which are common to both GCSE and IGCSE, such as Maths, the papers and syllabuses can vary quite dramatically.

    The only reason they share the "GCSE" element in their names is that students would generally sit them at the same point in their education, i.e. at the end of compulsory secondary school, as opposed to them being similar qualifications which can be compared like for like.

    You mentioned that the IGCSE courses are mainly offered by Edexcel, but when I ask my cousin on what exam board he takes; he goes to me "Cambridge"?

    ANY IDEAS??
 
 
 
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