Help with my career choices Watch

Danny2JZ
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Hey guys,

I don't know what pathway to take for my career.

I've got a permanent job within a Warehouse and theres lot of choices for progression obviously if you work hard and apply for other job roles within the company, I could go to Clerk £9.43hr to Section Leader £10.43hr, to Supervisor £25k annual start of then goes to £28k annual and maybe Shift Manager which is like £30k to 33k annual.. thats the (free) way.

Or other option go to college while still work there and maybe university I don't know? maybe do like Engineering or computing IT jobs? and thats when you have to save up for the cost of courses..

i'm not on much right now only on £8.43 as a Warehouse Operative and the Company is Matalan.

Do you guys know which is the best option for me? just want to be financially stable and have no worries about money anymore as having money problems throughout the year.

Please help thanks!☺
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SarcAndSpark
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It sounds like you've got options for promotion in your current role- and if you like the company you work for, this may be the path to follow.

If you haven't been to university before, there's a lot of financial help available. It may also be an option to do a course part time and work alongside it. If you're not really sure what you want to do, would the company you're with offer you the chance to shadow some people in some different roles? This is something companies offer, and there's no harm in asking.
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Danny2JZ
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I do actually like the company that I work with they're very friendly and helpful and treat you right, the job is very easy to work in thats why it will be very easy for me to get the right experience to apply for other jobs. I dont think you get promotions.. you have to apply for higher jobs when they're available.. and they are available as I have been applying for them. But I think the company doesn't pay enough for the job roles people are working, other people agree too, but the company is the best i've worked with. To be honest I have like a set goal of payment i'd like to reach and then when I reach that goal theres no need to fight anymore to get higher, around 40k to 60k a year, so thats like managerial jobs and like computing jobs.

I've heard you don't have to have a lot of education for IT to get an alright salary with that sector.

My reason to do this is because i've had really really bad luck with money and no one supported me in anyway at all, I had to quit college and get a job away from my parents as they never supported me. I want to show myself I can be financially stable and have no problems with money coming from a background like that.

Sorry for going on and on just have a lot going on inside my brain😂
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
It sounds like you've got options for promotion in your current role- and if you like the company you work for, this may be the path to follow.

If you haven't been to university before, there's a lot of financial help available. It may also be an option to do a course part time and work alongside it. If you're not really sure what you want to do, would the company you're with offer you the chance to shadow some people in some different roles? This is something companies offer, and there's no harm in asking.
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Afterlife?
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You should find out some more about education and career paths in engineering and computer science or IT before committing as you may find that you don't actually like it. Also with if you were an engineer or IT guy or something you'd probably end up with like 30-35k in the same amount of time it would take you to get to a shift manager, so its not like it would be faster or anything.
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Danny2JZ
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(Original post by Afterlife?)
You should find out some more about education and career paths in engineering and computer science or IT before committing as you may find that you don't actually like it. Also with if you were an engineer or IT guy or something you'd probably end up with like 30-35k in the same amount of time it would take you to get to a shift manager, so its not like it would be faster or anything.
Thats why I mentioned Engineering or IT because I'll think i'll like doing that more than any other courses that there are, i've got a level 2 in Motor Vehicle but don't want to yo back into that industry as I want to keep cars as a hobby and not a day to day job, don't want to get bored of cars. I wouldn't mind fixing things and I always find IT fasinating. I'm not sure if i'll get bored of warehouse though, not sure if I like it that much to actually stay.
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Danny2JZ
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Also when your like in a job like Engineering or IT theres loads of other jobs to still progress from there once you've been in the position for a few years, but having really looked whats above shift manager.. I wouldn't think there would be much at all higher than that role would there? I know theres a wharehouse manager but the chances of getting that role would be really slim unlike progressing with Engineering or IT. Not sure if you get me
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Afterlife?
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(Original post by Danny2JZ)
Also when your like in a job like Engineering or IT theres loads of other jobs to still progress from there once you've been in the position for a few years, but having really looked whats above shift manager.. I wouldn't think there would be much at all higher than that role would there? I know theres a wharehouse manager but the chances of getting that role would be really slim unlike progressing with Engineering or IT. Not sure you get me
Yea I get you however with engineering you have to be careful as a lot of engineering roles nowadays become stagnant once you reach a couple years or so and ur on that 35k. It really depends on what you do tbh. I would say you should go for it would open up a lot of career paths for u not only in those fields , for example you can go to investment banking with ur engineering degree
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Ridgerunner
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Have you thought about the armed forces? Lots of trades available and good opportunities for progression, plus travel etc.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Danny2JZ)
I do actually like the company that I work with they're very friendly and helpful and treat you right, the job is very easy to work in thats why it will be very easy for me to get the right experience to apply for other jobs. I dont think you get promotions.. you have to apply for higher jobs when they're available.. and they are available as I have been applying for them. But I think the company doesn't pay enough for the job roles people are working, other people agree too, but the company is the best i've worked with. To be honest I have like a set goal of payment i'd like to reach and then when I reach that goal theres no need to fight anymore to get higher, around 40k to 60k a year, so thats like managerial jobs and like computing jobs.

I've heard you don't have to have a lot of education for IT to get an alright salary with that sector.

My reason to do this is because i've had really really bad luck with money and no one supported me in anyway at all, I had to quit college and get a job away from my parents as they never supported me. I want to show myself I can be financially stable and have no problems with money coming from a background like that.

Sorry for going on and on just have a lot going on inside my brain😂
Sometimes having a slightly lower salary can be worth it if the company is a good one to work for- as long as it's enough to live on of course. Applying for other jobs will be good as the company will see you're keen to progress, but they may want you to have been in your current role for 6 months to a year before considering moving you.

£40-60k is definitely an above average salary- I think the average UK salary is now something like £29k. It's very likely to achieve such a high salary you'd need a degree of some kind.

CompSci jobs can be great, but I do think if you'd really want to progress you'd need a degree. One way to do this might be to do an access course- these are funded by the government as long as you go on to do a degree, and there are options to do them part time as well. You'd also need A-level Maths to do CompSci at many universities, which you'd probably have to self fund- so it might be an idea to work in your current company for a few years and save up. You could also follow a similar route into an engineering degree.

Alternatively, you could look at apprenticeships in CompSci or Engineering- and following a level 3 apprenticeship you could move on to a degree apprenticeship or a more traditional degree. However, the minimum wage for apprentices is £3.90 for the first year- so that would be a significant pay cut and you might need to save to afford this as well.

Either way, there are lots of routes out there available to you, so do some research, maybe try to talk to people in roles you'd like about how they got to where they are, and you can definitely find a way to improve your situation.
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Molseh
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Can you be a little bit more specific as to what you think an IT job is? It is a pretty big field and a lot of it can be done self study wise.
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xDron3
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If you can get into management and have experience there it'll be a good shout.

You're only as good as your last job, so if you want to move elsewhere having management experience would be helpful.
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Danny2JZ
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When I said Engineering I meant Electrical Engineering maybe that would be a bit more better
(Original post by Afterlife?)
Yea I get you however with engineering you have to be careful as a lot of engineering roles nowadays become stagnant once you reach a couple years or so and ur on that 35k. It really depends on what you do tbh. I would say you should go for it would open up a lot of career paths for u not only in those fields , for example you can go to investment banking with ur engineering degree
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Danny2JZ
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(Original post by Ridgerunner)
Have you thought about the armed forces? Lots of trades available and good opportunities for progression, plus travel etc.
I'm not really interested in the armed forces because i've got a girlfriend and i'd like to spend more time with her, we both probably wouldn't be able to cope me being away for months on end haha
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Danny2JZ
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Yeah maybe £40k-£60k is too much haha, went a bit overboard there, i've done really bad in school and got bad grades maths ect.. so probably Computer Sci is out the window, I couldnt do an apprenticeship as I really need money at the moment and couldn't afford to get a worse pay than I am right now.

Because i've gotten bad grades i'd probably have to start with level 1 or 2, I do have motor vehicle level 2 though which is mechanical, was thinking of electrical engineering down the road but got to save up quite a lot of money first and get my car which would help with travels.

(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Sometimes having a slightly lower salary can be worth it if the company is a good one to work for- as long as it's enough to live on of course. Applying for other jobs will be good as the company will see you're keen to progress, but they may want you to have been in your current role for 6 months to a year before considering moving you.

£40-60k is definitely an above average salary- I think the average UK salary is now something like £29k. It's very likely to achieve such a high salary you'd need a degree of some kind.

CompSci jobs can be great, but I do think if you'd really want to progress you'd need a degree. One way to do this might be to do an access course- these are funded by the government as long as you go on to do a degree, and there are options to do them part time as well. You'd also need A-level Maths to do CompSci at many universities, which you'd probably have to self fund- so it might be an idea to work in your current company for a few years and save up. You could also follow a similar route into an engineering degree.

Alternatively, you could look at apprenticeships in CompSci or Engineering- and following a level 3 apprenticeship you could move on to a degree apprenticeship or a more traditional degree. However, the minimum wage for apprentices is £3.90 for the first year- so that would be a significant pay cut and you might need to save to afford this as well.

Either way, there are lots of routes out there available to you, so do some research, maybe try to talk to people in roles you'd like about how they got to where they are, and you can definitely find a way to improve your situation.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Danny2JZ)
Yeah maybe £40k-£60k is too much haha, went a bit overboard there, i've done really bad in school and got bad grades maths ect.. so probably Computer Sci is out the window, I couldnt do an apprenticeship as I really need money at the moment and couldn't afford to get a worse pay than I am right now.

Because i've gotten bad grades i'd probably have to start with level 1 or 2, I do have motor vehicle level 2 though which is mechanical, was thinking of electrical engineering down the road but got to save up quite a lot of money first and get my car which would help with travels.
You can retake maths and English GCSEs for free, often via evening classes. This would be a really good first step, as it would probably also help you progress in your current role, and open a lot more doors to you.

You can look for a course here:
https://nationalcareersservice.direc...directory/home

Retaking GCSEs might also help give you some academic confidence, and help you decide what to do moving forwards.

You could then also look at doing an access course to prepare you for university if you decided that was what you wanted:
https://www.accesstohe.ac.uk/Pages/D...?carouseltab=1

There's funding available for these courses, so you wouldn't have to pay.

For either of the careers you've suggested, maths is very important. If maths is something you really struggle with, then it might be worth looking at different routes. There are lots of well paying careers that don't involve as much maths!
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by Danny2JZ)
Hey guys,

I don't know what pathway to take for my career.

I've got a permanent job within a Warehouse and theres lot of choices for progression obviously if you work hard and apply for other job roles within the company, I could go to Clerk £9.43hr to Section Leader £10.43hr, to Supervisor £25k annual start of then goes to £28k annual and maybe Shift Manager which is like £30k to 33k annual.. thats the (free) way.

Or other option go to college while still work there and maybe university I don't know? maybe do like Engineering or computing IT jobs? and thats when you have to save up for the cost of courses..

i'm not on much right now only on £8.43 as a Warehouse Operative and the Company is Matalan.

Do you guys know which is the best option for me? just want to be financially stable and have no worries about money anymore as having money problems throughout the year.

Please help thanks!☺
Well, some would say that i'm prejudiced - because i'm an electrical engineer - with a master's degree, which i earned quite a few years after i got my bachelor's. I got a bachelor's in 1969, my masters in 1987. Over the course of my career, i've lived in 14 countries (at customer expense naturally), whilst doing my engineering. I also took 2 ski trips at customer expense - as part of my compensation package. One to Switzerland, one to Austria. Three weeks each. When i retired from full time engineering, my annual salary was about $92,000USD. That was a few years ago. Presently, i'm consulting for two different customers in Puerto Rico who have satellite communications problems. I speak enough Spanish to get by, and most SATCOM work is in english anyway.

As to advice for you: The most commonly heard advice is: "You have to do something you like - so pick something you do like..." That is lousy advice for several reasons: a> at the age you are making that decision [under 30], you can't possibly have any idea of 90% of the careers that are 'on offer'. After more than 40 years working as a degreed engineer, i don't know about most of the careers you can do with an engineering degree - so how could you?

My criteria would be, for any job i am considering: "Will this job/career provide enough income to me, that i can support myself and my partner, as well as any kids, with enough income that we can live in a nice location, eat healthy food - without worrying about cost much, and enjoy ourselves with occasional vacations & indulgences - ski trips to Switzerland for example? Also, will i be fairly immune to economic downturns, layoffs, and management trainwrecks in the company i work for? Can i also provide a decent education for my child/ren so that they won't end up sweeping the streets or doing menial jobs? Additionally, will my career 'outlive' me - that is, can i be fairly certain that i can get a job in it, as long as i want one - that i won't end up being the 'best buggy whip maker' in the Uk, when petrol autos come in.

It takes a LOT more money to live decently than you think now - at your age. When i graduated in 1969 - i came to the D.C. area, and money was going out as fast as it was coming in. I quickly realised that i had to do something to 'get ahead of the power curve' as an elect engineer would say. ) I took a foreign job assignment for two years, and saved up enough money to buy (most of) a house when i got back. That effectively reduced my living expenses from about $900/month [which is what a flat would have cost me in rent then] to $257/month in house payments. The loan 'died' years ago - now i only have to pay the yearly real estate taxes - which are again, a fraction of what a flat would rent for - in fact, the taxes are about 2 months rent for a 3 bedroom flat here. That did a lot for my disposable income.

Doing a professional degree is a lot of work, and you wonder at times, why you are doing it, but - in my opinion, it's worth it in the end. You can do fairly well, working an overseas posting like i did. Bear in mind that you don't make any money going to places like London, Paris, Rome, D.C., etc. Everyone wants to go there, and you actually make less overall - than you would make back home. You have to go somewhere that nobody else wants to go - so that they have to BRIBE people to go there. Thats where you make some money. My post was described (in the US State Dept briefing) as an "isolated, extreme hardship post". That, among other things - was why we got 35% pay differential - as well as all the overtime we wanted, plus free room & board. It was not the Hilton, but it was "OK". We did have a swimming pool. The funny part was that none of the locals could swim. They thought we were crazy - jumping into that bottomless pool!

Once you live overseas for a few years, your world expands dramatically. There are many employers looking for overseas staff. Speaking English (or Yank) is a definite advantage, altho other languages are useful too - particularly if they are the ones spoken in a country where there is a job opening.

Here in the states, many companies will pay the tuition for employees wanting to attend uni. I spend 7 years doing my master's degree (one course at a time), with my employer paying the bills. These are often larger, international companies. They may want you to work for them for 3 or 4 years after you graduate as compensation. Beats paying the tuition yourself i'd think. I know McDonalds (for one) pays tution for their employees - at least they do in the US. I've seen the adverts. Best of luck!!
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