Career choices with A level Maths Watch

NeonGlue
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Currently predicted 9s for Chemistry, Physics and Maths and for A level, I'll be doing Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Further Maths. I've been doing some research (looking on payscale) into the career paths I could choose and chemical engineering (or just engineering in general) looks like the best option for me. Still wondering if there are any other paths I could take. I feel like I'm missing the bigger picture. Any advice?
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thestudent33
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(Original post by NeonGlue)
Currently predicted 9s for Chemistry, Physics and Maths and for A level, I'll be doing Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Further Maths. I've been doing some research (looking on payscale) into the career paths I could choose and chemical engineering (or just engineering in general) looks like the best option for me. Still wondering if there are any other paths I could take. I feel like I'm missing the bigger picture. Any advice?
Engineering is an excellent career path but there's also loads more careers you could do with those A-levels as they're all facilitating subjects
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NeonGlue
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(Original post by thestudent33)
there's also loads more careers you could do with those A-levels as they're all facilitating subjects
Can you name a few example of other careers. And also, if I was to change one of my A level options, which one would it be?
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thestudent33
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(Original post by NeonGlue)
Can you name a few example of other careers. And also, if I was to change one of my A level options, which one would it be?
See this thread for a brief idea: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4644862

In terms of options I think they're fine as long as you enjoy them
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Themysticalegg
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Honestly A-level Maths is one of the best subjects you could do.
Degree Apprenticeships with any of the below, so you do a degree whilst working for the firm full time.
Finance and Investment banking with an Economics/Actuarial Science degree --> Outrageous salary but very hard to get into and requires lots of work experience and in this case it helps to have a degree from one of the top universities such as LSE, Imperial, Oxbridge.
Top 4 accounting firm consulting -> KPMG, Deloitte, PwC, E&Y.
Civil Service Fast Stream: People may think this is a strange choice however you get a good work life balance in comparison to the above. So good pay/hour ratio. Also very good job security.
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NeonGlue
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(Original post by thestudent33)
In terms of options I think they're fine as long as you enjoy them
After reading this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5780092 I'm feeling unsure.
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Sinnoh
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Really your A-level choices are unlikely to set your career paths in stone. Not even the degree you do - Brian May went from doing physics to being the guitarist for Queen. Angela Merkel has a PhD in chemistry.

A lot of STEM graduates go into IT or finance, stuff like that. Just because you do a degree in chemical engineering, it doesn't mean you have to then be a chemical engineer. You don't have to be a research scientist if you take physics. You could take economics and come out broke. It's up to you, not your degree.

So when you apply to uni, pick a course you'd genuinely be interested in studying for 3-4 years.
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by NeonGlue)
After reading this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5780092 I'm feeling unsure.
Don't be scared of that I don't exactly go to a top of the range university and my friends worked hard to get industrial placements and have a job guaranteed at multinational engineering companies. As long as you're willing to work hard you will get out of the experience what you put into it.
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Really your A-level choices are unlikely to set your career paths in stone. Not even the degree you do - Brian May went from doing physics to being the guitarist for Queen. Angela Merkel has a PhD in chemistry.

A lot of STEM graduates go into IT or finance, stuff like that. Just because you do a degree in chemical engineering, it doesn't mean you have to then be a chemical engineer. You don't have to be a research scientist if you take physics. You could take economics and come out broke. It's up to you, not your degree.

So when you apply to uni, pick a course you'd genuinely be interested in studying for 3-4 years.
To add to this Maths and STEM is one of the most flexible subjects you can do basically and in general with STEM you can do anything you can yoink the jobs in any sector due to how well respected the subjects are. For example most of the business jobs I applied for the recommended was STEM subject or Business. Also another example is when I got interviewed for a Project Controls Engineer job with a business degree (it was one of the recommended degrees) I'm pretty sure this man interviewed me just to bully me for not doing engineering for an hour. (He was also 2 hours late)
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 1 week ago
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Princepieman
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Really your A-level choices are unlikely to set your career paths in stone. Not even the degree you do - Brian May went from doing physics to being the guitarist for Queen. Angela Merkel has a PhD in chemistry.

A lot of STEM graduates go into IT or finance, stuff like that. Just because you do a degree in chemical engineering, it doesn't mean you have to then be a chemical engineer. You don't have to be a research scientist if you take physics. You could take economics and come out broke. It's up to you, not your degree.

So when you apply to uni, pick a course you'd genuinely be interested in studying for 3-4 years.
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