Edexcel GCSE English literature (1ET0) - Paper 2 - 23 May, 2019 Watch

Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Paper reference: 1ET0 02
Paper title: Paper 2: 19th-century Novel and Poetry since 1789
Duration: 2h 15mins
Maximum mark available: 80 (50% of GCSE)
Date of paper: Thursday, 23 May, 2019 (a.m.)
Paper 1 discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5878394

Useful resources and information concerning this paper

Grade boundaries for the paper (out of 80 marks):
Spoiler:
Show

2017
Grade 9 - 67 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 61 marks
Grade 7 - 55 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 47 marks
Grade 5 - 40 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 33 marks ('standard' pass)

2018
Grade 9 - 62 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 56 marks
Grade 7 - 51 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 44 marks
Grade 5 - 38 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 32 marks ('standard' pass)


Past papers, mark schemes and examiners' reports:


Key subject terminology:

While solely identifying these features of any text during your exegesis in the exam is worth barely any marks, the 'top grade' students should be identifying all of these correctly.

Some literary devices (a.k.a. linguistic devices) that constitute 'language' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Word classes (i.e. nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs - this is as much as you have to know, but any more knowledge of word classes or grammar itself doesn't go astray, just remember that almost all of the credit is gained from the analysis, not just the sophistication of the subject terminology)
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • Juxtaposition
  • Litotes/meiosis
  • Anaphora
  • Epistrophe
  • Polysyndeton or asyndeton
  • Imagery
  • Hyperbole
  • Alliteration
  • Strong/powerful/emotive language
  • Tricolon
  • Repitions right next to each other (e.g. Bang, bang, bang, bang!)


Some points that constitute 'form' (AO2):

Spoiler:
Show

For the 19th-century novel (Section A):
Characters
Themes
Genre (e.g. gothic)
Setting
Other forms within (e.g. a letter)

For poetry (Section B):
  • Iambic pentameter
  • Iambic tetrameter
  • Rhyme scheme (e.g. AABB)
  • Rhyming couplets
  • Blank verse
  • Enjambment
  • Fixed forms (e.g. sonnet, ballad)


Some structural features that constitute 'structure' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Punctuation (e.g. exclamation mark, commas, dashes)
  • Repetitions used throughout
  • Shifts in focus
  • External actions of characters
  • Internal thoughts of characters
  • Shifts in pace
  • Sentence type (e.g. declarative, exclamative, compound, complex, etc.)
  • Motifs


Guide through the paper
General:

  • While AO4 is not assessed here, it is important for your technical accuracy to be at a high standard.
  • There are four essays in this paper, none of which should be missed out.
  • The examination paper will be in the form of a thick booklet, so you should probably just mark which questions you will be doing early on so you do not get confused (or even worse, struggle and exhaust yourself answering the question you weren't trained for!).
  • Use the essay structures that you find the best.
  • You may find planning useful.
  • When you are in the exam, tick the right box that corresponds to the question you are answering. Yes, the examiner can find it themselves if it does go wrong, but you don't want to irritate them before they've even seen the first sentence!
  • Examiners always mark positively when it comes to essays. They're probably teachers too and understand the pressure that you're facing.

Section A (19th-century prose), part a (20 marks):
  • Analyse how the language, form and structure used by the author to create meanings and expressions relate to the question (AO2).
  • Always quote as evidence to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the extract is in front of you.
  • Only focus on the extract given.
  • Context is NOT REQUIRED.

Section A (19th-century pose), part b (20 marks):
  • Discuss your critical opinion (AO1) on how different events or characters in the play are related to the topic of the questions (either a theme, character, aspect of the plot or the setting, which will relate to the excerpt in part a).
  • Try and use pertinent quotes from the rest of the play as this is a question that asks for a global analysis.
  • Try and include a pithy conclusion.
  • DO NOT discuss language, form or structure at all.
  • Try to avoid using quotes from the excerpt at all costs.
  • Although context (AO3) is not assessed, the sociohistorical influences on the novel can still be used to support AO1. It should be noted that isolated context or context that doesn't seem relevant to the critical opinion will gain no credit here though.

Section B, Part I (poetry since 1789 - 20 marks):
  • This is a comparative essay, so you should aim to compare the language, form and structure (AO2) of the chosen poem and the poem you wish to compare it with. Analysis of one poem only is classed as a rubric infringement, and your marks will be capped regardless of your analysis's quality.
  • Always quote as evidence from the chosen poem to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the poem is in front of you. Don't worry about quotes from the poem that you wish to compare it with. The examiners accept around three or four as reasonable.
  • Remember to include CONTEXT (AO3) that is relevant to the point being made.

Section B, Part II (unseen poetry - 20 marks)
  • This is another comparative essay, and the same principles that applied in the previous question apply here as well. Just pure AO2 analysis is required here.
  • Always quote as evidence from both. You have no excuse as the poems are in front of you.

(If any of you want help, I scored 76/80 on this paper last year. I am free to help, so just DM me!)

May the odds be ever in your favour for all taking the exam!
Last edited by Tolgarda; 4 days ago
3
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#2
Evil Homer I have created a new thread that can be added to the GCSE-thread exams list.
0
reply
kawabi
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
how many paragraphs should i aim for for all these 20 mark questions
(Original post by Tolgarda)
Paper reference: 1ET0 02
Paper title: Paper 2: 19th-century Novel and Poetry since 1789
Duration: 2h 15m
Maximum mark available: 80 (50% of GCSE)
Date of paper: Thursday, 23 May, 2019 (a.m.)
Paper 1 discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5878394

Useful resources and information concerning this paper

Grade boundaries for the paper (out of 80 marks):
Spoiler:
Show

2017
Grade 9 - 67 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 61 marks
Grade 7 - 55 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 47 marks
Grade 5 - 40 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 33 marks ('standard' pass)

2018
Grade 9 - 62 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 56 marks
Grade 7 - 51 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 44 marks
Grade 5 - 38 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 32 marks ('standard' pass)


Past papers, mark schemes and examiners' reports:


Key subject terminology:

While solely identifying these features of any text during your exegesis in the exam is worth barely any marks, the 'top grade' students should be identifying all of these correctly.

Some literary devices (a.k.a. linguistic devices) that constitute 'language' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Word classes (i.e. nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs - this is as much as you have to know, but any more knowledge of word classes or grammar itself doesn't go astray, just remember that almost all of the credit is gained from the analysis, not just the sophistication of the subject terminology)
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • Juxtaposition
  • Litotes/meiosis
  • Anaphora
  • Epistrophe
  • Polysyndeton or asyndeton
  • Imagery
  • Hyperbole
  • Alliteration
  • Strong/powerful/emotive language
  • Tricolon
  • Repitions right next to each other (e.g. Bang, bang, bang, bang!)


Some points that constitute 'form' (AO2):

Spoiler:
Show

For the 19th-century novel (Section A):
Characters
Themes
Genre (e.g. gothic)
Setting
Other forms within (e.g. a letter)

For poetry (Section B):
  • Iambic pentameter
  • Iambic tetrameter
  • Rhyme scheme (e.g. AABB)
  • Rhyming couplets
  • Blank verse
  • Enjambment
  • Fixed forms (e.g. sonnet, ballad)


Some structural features that constitute 'structure' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Punctuation (e.g. exclamation mark, commas, dashes)
  • Repetitions used throughout
  • Shifts in focus
  • External actions of characters
  • Internal thoughts of characters
  • Shifts in pace
  • Sentence type (e.g. declarative, exclamative, compound, complex, etc.)
  • Motifs


Guide through the paper
General:

  • While AO4 is not assessed here, it is important for your technical accuracy to be at a high standard.
  • There are four essays in this paper, none of which should be missed out.
  • The examination paper will be in the form of a thick booklet, so you should probably just mark which questions you will be doing early on so you do not get confused (or even worse, struggle and exhaust yourself answering the question you weren't trained for!).
  • Use the essay structures that you find the best.
  • You may find planning useful.
  • When you are in the exam, tick the right box that corresponds to the question you are answering. Yes, the examiner can find it themselves if it does go wrong, but you don't want to irritate them before they've even seen the first sentence!
  • Examiners always mark positively when it comes to essays. They're probably teachers too and understand the pressure that you're facing.

Section A (19th-century prose), part a (20 marks):
  • Analyse how the language, form and structure used by the author to create meanings and expressions relate to the question (AO2).
  • Always quote as evidence to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the extract is in front of you.
  • Only focus on the extract given.
  • Context is NOT REQUIRED.

Section A (19th-century pose), part b (20 marks):
  • Discuss your critical opinion (AO1) on how different events or characters in the play are related to the topic of the questions (either a theme, character, aspect of the plot or the setting, which will relate to the excerpt in part a).
  • Try and use pertinent quotes from the rest of the play as this is a question that asks for a global analysis.
  • Try and include a pithy conclusion.
  • DO NOT discuss language, form or structure at all.
  • Try to avoid using quotes from the excerpt at all costs.
  • Although context (AO3) is not assessed, the sociohistorical influences on the novel can still be used to support AO1. It should be noted that isolated context or context that doesn't seem relevant to the critical opinion will gain no credit here though.

Section B, Part I (poetry since 1789 - 20 marks):
  • This is a comparative essay, so you should aim to compare the language, form and structure (AO2) of the chosen poem and the poem you wish to compare it with. Analysis of one poem only is classed as a rubric infringement, and your marks will be capped regardless of your analysis's quality.
  • Always quote as evidence from the chosen poem to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the poem is in front of you. Don't worry about quotes from the poem that you wish to compare it with. The examiners accept around three or four as reasonable.
  • Remember to include CONTEXT (AO3) that is relevant to the point being made.

Section B, Part II (unseen poetry - 20 marks)
  • This is another comparative essay, and the same principles that applied in the previous question apply here as well. Just pure AO2 analysis is required here.
  • Always quote as evidence from both. You have no excuse as the poems are in front of you.

(If any of you want help, I scored 76/80 on this paper last year. I am free to help, so just DM me!)

May the odds be ever in your favour for all taking the exam!
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by kawabi)
how many paragraphs should i aim for for all these 20 mark questions
Three for each. Any more and you're probably wasting your time.
0
reply
kawabi
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
How can characters, themes and setting constitute to 'form' AO2
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by kawabi)
How can characters, themes and setting constitute to 'form' AO2
The form is basically what the text is. In a text, you want to know what type of text it is (e.g. play), its genre (e.g. romance), what sort of characters you're going to be putting in, your settings and your themes. You do not have to listen to this advice if you think that it is wrong.
Last edited by Tolgarda; 3 weeks ago
0
reply
Notprepared
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
What are the prediction
(Original post by Tolgarda)
Paper reference: 1ET0 02
Paper title: Paper 2: 19th-century Novel and Poetry since 1789
Duration: 2h 15m
Maximum mark available: 80 (50% of GCSE)
Date of paper: Thursday, 23 May, 2019 (a.m.)
Paper 1 discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5878394

Useful resources and information concerning this paper

Grade boundaries for the paper (out of 80 marks):
Spoiler:
Show

2017
Grade 9 - 67 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 61 marks
Grade 7 - 55 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 47 marks
Grade 5 - 40 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 33 marks ('standard' pass)

2018
Grade 9 - 62 marks (top grade)
Grade 8 - 56 marks
Grade 7 - 51 marks (legacy 'A' grade)
Grade 6 - 44 marks
Grade 5 - 38 marks ('strong' pass)
Grade 4 - 32 marks ('standard' pass)


Past papers, mark schemes and examiners' reports:


Key subject terminology:

While solely identifying these features of any text during your exegesis in the exam is worth barely any marks, the 'top grade' students should be identifying all of these correctly.

Some literary devices (a.k.a. linguistic devices) that constitute 'language' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Word classes (i.e. nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs - this is as much as you have to know, but any more knowledge of word classes or grammar itself doesn't go astray, just remember that almost all of the credit is gained from the analysis, not just the sophistication of the subject terminology)
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • Juxtaposition
  • Litotes/meiosis
  • Anaphora
  • Epistrophe
  • Polysyndeton or asyndeton
  • Imagery
  • Hyperbole
  • Alliteration
  • Strong/powerful/emotive language
  • Tricolon
  • Repitions right next to each other (e.g. Bang, bang, bang, bang!)


Some points that constitute 'form' (AO2):

Spoiler:
Show

For the 19th-century novel (Section A):
Characters
Themes
Genre (e.g. gothic)
Setting
Other forms within (e.g. a letter)

For poetry (Section B):
  • Iambic pentameter
  • Iambic tetrameter
  • Rhyme scheme (e.g. AABB)
  • Rhyming couplets
  • Blank verse
  • Enjambment
  • Fixed forms (e.g. sonnet, ballad)


Some structural features that constitute 'structure' (AO2):
Spoiler:
Show

  • Punctuation (e.g. exclamation mark, commas, dashes)
  • Repetitions used throughout
  • Shifts in focus
  • External actions of characters
  • Internal thoughts of characters
  • Shifts in pace
  • Sentence type (e.g. declarative, exclamative, compound, complex, etc.)
  • Motifs


Guide through the paper
General:

  • While AO4 is not assessed here, it is important for your technical accuracy to be at a high standard.
  • There are four essays in this paper, none of which should be missed out.
  • The examination paper will be in the form of a thick booklet, so you should probably just mark which questions you will be doing early on so you do not get confused (or even worse, struggle and exhaust yourself answering the question you weren't trained for!).
  • Use the essay structures that you find the best.
  • You may find planning useful.
  • When you are in the exam, tick the right box that corresponds to the question you are answering. Yes, the examiner can find it themselves if it does go wrong, but you don't want to irritate them before they've even seen the first sentence!
  • Examiners always mark positively when it comes to essays. They're probably teachers too and understand the pressure that you're facing.

Section A (19th-century prose), part a (20 marks):
  • Analyse how the language, form and structure used by the author to create meanings and expressions relate to the question (AO2).
  • Always quote as evidence to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the extract is in front of you.
  • Only focus on the extract given.
  • Context is NOT REQUIRED.

Section A (19th-century pose), part b (20 marks):
  • Discuss your critical opinion (AO1) on how different events or characters in the play are related to the topic of the questions (either a theme, character, aspect of the plot or the setting, which will relate to the excerpt in part a).
  • Try and use pertinent quotes from the rest of the play as this is a question that asks for a global analysis.
  • Try and include a pithy conclusion.
  • DO NOT discuss language, form or structure at all.
  • Try to avoid using quotes from the excerpt at all costs.
  • Although context (AO3) is not assessed, the sociohistorical influences on the novel can still be used to support AO1. It should be noted that isolated context or context that doesn't seem relevant to the critical opinion will gain no credit here though.

Section B, Part I (poetry since 1789 - 20 marks):
  • This is a comparative essay, so you should aim to compare the language, form and structure (AO2) of the chosen poem and the poem you wish to compare it with. Analysis of one poem only is classed as a rubric infringement, and your marks will be capped regardless of your analysis's quality.
  • Always quote as evidence from the chosen poem to support your opinion. You have no excuse as the poem is in front of you. Don't worry about quotes from the poem that you wish to compare it with. The examiners accept around three or four as reasonable.
  • Remember to include CONTEXT (AO3) that is relevant to the point being made.

Section B, Part II (unseen poetry - 20 marks)
  • This is another comparative essay, and the same principles that applied in the previous question apply here as well. Just pure AO2 analysis is required here.
  • Always quote as evidence from both. You have no excuse as the poems are in front of you.

(If any of you want help, I scored 76/80 on this paper last year. I am free to help, so just DM me!)

May the odds be ever in your favour for all taking the exam!
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by Notprepared)
What are the prediction
F*cking anything LOL.
0
reply
qb2507
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
Hi,
Firstly, thanks for putting this together; it's going to help a lot with my revision.
In the poetry exam, the question asks you to compare the poems based on a steer (e.g. anger, romance). Should I compare the ideas of the poem related to the steer or the language/structure/form of the poems?
1
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by qb2507)
Hi,
Firstly, thanks for putting this together; it's going to help a lot with my revision.
In the poetry exam, the question asks you to compare the poems based on a steer (e.g. anger, romance). Should I compare the ideas of the poem related to the steer or the language/structure/form of the poems?
The latter. You should be comparing how the language, structure and form all relate to the steer. If any of the ideas pertain to the steer as well, discuss them, but it must be predicated on AO2 analysis.
0
reply
katiedoighty2003
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 week ago
#11
exam is thursday obviously - ive just had my paper 1 so im having a relaxing night free of revision. is this ok?
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by katiedoighty2003)
exam is thursday obviously - ive just had my paper 1 so im having a relaxing night free of revision. is this ok?
More than okay! In fact, it's what I did lol!
0
reply
katiedoighty2003
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
i know its too early but any predictions? I do A Christmas Carol and Conflict
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#14
(Original post by katiedoighty2003)
i know its too early but any predictions? I do A Christmas Carol and Conflict
Predictions are a fool's errand, in my opinion. Don't worry about it.
Last edited by Tolgarda; 1 week ago
0
reply
Notprepared
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 week ago
#15
Same what r the prediction though?
(Original post by katiedoighty2003)
i know its too early but any predictions? I do A Christmas Carol and Conflict
0
reply
Krishna1601
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 days ago
#16
how do you revise for poetry do you memorise actual poems?
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#17
(Original post by Krishna1601)
how do you revise for poetry do you memorise actual poems?
You don't have to memorise any poems fully.
0
reply
Krishna1601
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 days ago
#18
so how do i revise for poetry
(Original post by Tolgarda)
You don't have to memorise any poems fully.
0
reply
Notprepared
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 days ago
#19
Guy the grade boundaries going up
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#20
(Original post by Krishna1601)
so how do i revise for poetry
Important and comparable quotes should be memorised, along with contextual information. You can interpret the poems on the spot to fit the question (which is what I did), which is a technique that will help you for unseen poetry.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Arts University Bournemouth
    Art and Design Foundation Diploma Further education
    Sat, 25 May '19
  • SOAS University of London
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 May '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Thu, 30 May '19

How did your AQA GCSE Physics Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (401)
30.66%
The paper was reasonable (513)
39.22%
Not feeling great about that exam... (225)
17.2%
It was TERRIBLE (169)
12.92%

Watched Threads

View All