Permanent Exclusion - Effects on Future Watch

Djp13372
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I was recently permanently excluded from my school. Googling it hasn’t really helped so I’ve come here to ask. How will this affect my future (eg. Further education, job applications)?
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Compost
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Which school year are you in?
Any ideas when and where you are going to attend school next?
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Merridan
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You (or your parents) might find this useful:

https://www.gov.uk/school-discipline...ons/exclusions

You will probably be sent to some school for excluded kids
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Djp13372
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I’m in Year 10. The FAP meeting is in May, and there are 2 schools I could be sent to.
(Original post by Compost)
Which school year are you in?
Any ideas when and where you are going to attend school next?
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Djp13372
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Yeah we went to that school, they said their school wasn’t really good for me, so I’m doing online Tute education at the moment.
(Original post by Merridan)
You (or your parents) might find this useful:

https://www.gov.uk/school-discipline...ons/exclusions

You will probably be sent to some school for excluded kids
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Compost
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A lot of things come into play - when you're excluded (the nearer to GCSEs the worse it is). how long it is before you get back into full time education, where you land up, how much your reputation follows you, your attitude - and a healthy dose of luck.

II can think of one kid who joined my school in Year 9 after exclusion. He was lucky that the reasons didn't follow him. He just got his head down, put some work in, kept a low profile but made a few friends (sport helped with that) and got great GCSEs (all As and A*s) and it probably won't have any impact on his future life (apart from teaching him a lesson). I can think of another who joined us in February of Year 11, everyone knew why and he reacted badly to that, did nothing to help himself on the inevitable mismatch of what he'd studied and the courses we taught, he did way worse than his previous school had expected for GCSE and crashed and burnt from there.

A fair bit of it will be in your hands. It's hard to join a new school in Year 10, particularly if you have something to live down, but putting on a 'hard man' front to protect yourself is almost certainly a bad idea. Even if you can settle in without any social aggro, there are likely to be differences in courses so you may have to switch a couple of subjects and catch up on stuff you've missed in others. Teachers are busy enough without having to provide catch up lessons so be polite about asking but don't ignore it until the last minute - the summer holidays would be an ideal time to read that set book the rest of them have already read (or at least watch the film) or learn about the History you've missed.

Good luck.
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sophia5892
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(Original post by Djp13372)
I was recently permanently excluded from my school. Googling it hasn’t really helped so I’ve come here to ask. How will this affect my future (eg. Further education, job applications)?
Thanks
For further education you'll probably get a reference from your school - provided you don't get into trouble at your new school, I can't see that having gone there after an exclusion would matter too much. Teachers generally have your best interests at heart - they're not likely to mention the exclusion (if they're even allowed to) and sabotage your application if you've shown you can be a good student. (It might be a little different if you're in year 11 transferring schools now, as they wouldn't have long to get to know you... but I'm presuming you're younger and have time to make a good impression!)


For job applications you'll likely be asked to list your school(s) and qualifications, so unless you... mess up your GCSEs, have a gap in education, or end up attending a school where the school name makes it obvious it's for excluded pupils/pupils who've had issues in mainstream education (e.g. a PRU), then future employers shouldn't know.

If it's just a case of moving from local high school A to local high school B with no gap, there could be any number of reasons you've moved: bullying, childcare issues, easier travel, friendship groups etc. I doubt an employer would query it.

And once you're applying for jobs after further education, any references will come from your college/sixth form, so no reason for your referee to know you'd been excluded in high school.


I'd say the hardest part is making that good impression in your new school. Although teachers shouldn't hold it against you and should be trying to help you settle in, it can be difficult to not be subconsciously biased/prejudiced. When you know you're getting a student who's been a "problem" elsewhere, it can be worrying for teachers and they might be more likely to come down quite hard on you at first - that whole cliche of if you let the little things slide, then students will think they can get away with more Plus I've taught secondary - it can be scary

Whatever you do, don't let it get to you - if you think they're being unfair or targeting you when actually there were 6 of you doing whatever.... don't argue, suck it up, and if it's becoming a problem talk to your form tutor or the pastoral support team. For the vast majority of teachers, once they realise that you don't intend to be a problem in their classroom, they'll be fine with you. And arguing at the beginning will only reinforce any negative stereotype they have of you and increase sanctions. Better to take the verbal warning (or whatever the first stage of their behaviour policy is... but usually it's something that gets wiped at the end of the lesson), than argue and end up with a detention. Easier said than done, I know!

Good luck
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