Postgraduate Uni courses Watch

thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
Im currently in my last year of A levels and am just thinking ahead for my studies beyond my degree. I am aiming to pursue a masters course in my chosen degree and am curious as to how the application process works for post-graduate courses? For top tier universities, what do they generally look at when choosing candidates (is it good A level grades? GCSEs? Which uni you went to or what course you did)? Does it really matter if you dont have good grades at A level or GCSE but still get predicted a first or high 2:1? Will not having some of these reduce your chances of getting an offer for a post-grad course?
Last edited by thoxque; 1 week ago
0
reply
MatureScientist
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
You’re thinking too far ahead of yourself! Many undergrads don’t even know what they going to do after they graduate, and that’s when they’re in the final year!
Seriously though, if you go along to a postgraduate day, yep been there myself as I wanted to get further information about an MSc in GIS and remote sensing, and I got the clarity, which I’ve put in a box file so I can concentrate on my present course. And it’s also about your chosen subject too. Postgrad course change very frequently so if you have a a particular Masters or PhD mind now it may change in four or five years time, so it’s worth keeping an open mind. Certainly it pays well to look ahead and have plans but don’t set something in stone. Keep your options open, there maybe a subject that you hadn’t even thought about that you get to study in your first degree that surprises you!
(Original post by thoxque)
Im currently in my last year of A levels and am just thinking ahead for my studies beyond my degree. I am aiming to pursue a masters course in my chosen degree and am curious as to how the application process works for post-graduate courses? For top tier universities, what do they generally look at when choosing candidates (is it good A level grades? GCSEs? Which uni you went to or what course you did)? Does it really matter if you dont have good grades at A level or GCSE but still get predicted a first or high 2:1? Will not having some of these reduce your chances of getting an offer for a post-grad course??
0
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
I know the subject in general what i want to study and I know that I will be more/less interested in different things within it as I study it more, but what I do know is that I want to do a post-grad course after so I can gain more qualifications and be have more job prospects after. But what im really unsure of Is how the application process works. What are unis looking for? Is it just good grades in their chosen graduate course (as uni qualifications are higher than a levels/gcses or will top unis straight up reject people with bad/insufficient grade requirements) as in A level applications are ruthless with meeting the grades for the course.
(Original post by MatureScientist)
You’re thinking too far ahead of yourself! Many undergrads don’t even know what they going to do after they graduate, and that’s when they’re in the final year!
Seriously though, if you go along to a postgraduate day, yep been there myself as I wanted to get further information about an MSc in GIS and remote sensing, and I got the clarity, which I’ve put in a box file so I can concentrate on my present course. And it’s also about your chosen subject too. Postgrad course change very frequently so if you have a a particular Masters or PhD mind now it may change in four or five years time, so it’s worth keeping an open mind. Certainly it pays well to look ahead and have plans but don’t set something in stone. Keep your options open, there maybe a subject that you hadn’t even thought about that you get to study in your first degree that surprises you!
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
A-level grades and GCSEs are ignored. They base it on the quality of your personal statement and the quality of your academic references and university results. University prestige doesn't matter too much. I've seen people go from CCU (Canterbury Christ Church) to UCL. What type of subject would you do?

I'm honestly doing my MA for fun not for job prospects.
1
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
I want to study Economics for the time being and in my later 2nd and 3rd year where i get optional courses will decide what i am more/less interested in, but my dilemma is, I didnt get an offer from the top university I applied to. I am debating whether its worth taking a gap year out and reapplying to get into the better uni (for exactly the same course) or to just crack on and get started on my degree and forgetting about it? I dont mind taking a year out to do that but I just dont know if it would be worth it, in terms of will it just be overlooked by the time i get round to applying for a post-grad course at better unis down the line?
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
A-level grades and GCSEs are ignored. They base it on the quality of your personal statement and the quality of your academic references and university results. University prestige doesn't matter too much. I've seen people go from CCU (Canterbury Christ Church) to UCL. What type of subject would you do?

I'm honestly doing my MA for fun not for job prospects.
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by thoxque)
I want to study Economics for the time being and in my later 2nd and 3rd year where i get optional courses will decide what i am more/less interested in, but my dilemma is, I didnt get an offer from the top university I applied to. I am debating whether its worth taking a gap year out and reapplying to get into the better uni (for exactly the same course) or to just crack on and get started on my degree and forgetting about it? I dont mind taking a year out to do that but I just dont know if it would be worth it, in terms of will it just be overlooked by the time i get round to applying for a post-grad course at better unis down the line?
It depends what the top university is and what the backup university is. For Economics honestly it's likely to be a case of Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial/UCL then Exeter/King's etc. then everything else. After that work experience most likely matters more on the employment front. You could even crack on to this university do the first year then apply for the better university. This way you'll have further proof you're capable of doing well at the better university. In terms of entry into Masters level generally it's unlikely the first university will hinder you much (depending on which one it is) as long as you get a good university score. When I know the universities I can say more. I am a Business Management student and am somewhat aware of Economics.
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 1 week ago
0
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
My backup uni is Surrey, i know its decent, but its just not where I originally wanted to go and I dont know whether or not its worth reapplying next year to the one i wanted to initially firm.
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
It depends what the top university is and what the backup university is. For Economics honestly it's likely to be a case of Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial/UCL then Exeter/King's etc. then everything else. After that work experience most likely matters more on the employment front. You could even crack on to this university do the first year then apply for the better university. This way you'll have further proof you're capable of doing well at the better university. In terms of entry into Masters level generally it's unlikely the first university will hinder you much (depending on which one it is) as long as you get a good university score. When I know the universities I can say more. I am a Business Management student and am somewhat aware of Economics.
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by thoxque)
My backup uni is Surrey, i know its decent, but its just not where I originally wanted to go and I dont know whether or not its worth reapplying next year to the one i wanted to initially firm.
Surrey is good enough for Masters you'll get in anywhere with a good personal statement and references and a good score. (Most ask for a 2,1) For the special cases of LSE, Oxbridge you will also need to take a GMAT or similar aptitude test as well and have over a 1st class however you will still be fine with Surrey as long as you do well on PS, references, GMAT. CV's are also looked at. Whose your firm if you don't mind me asking? (If not don't worry!)
Again as I said before you can always do a year at Surrey do well, then request a transfer to a favoured institution. Gap year is ok but if it's not LSE/Oxbridge level the jump wouldn't be too major especially if we're taking into account that you want to do a masters. The thing is at the end of the day you're going to be at the institution for 3 years so do bear that in mind with your decision. If you absolutely hate Surrey then... gap year/transfer is the choice.
1
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#9
How would you get 'over' a first class lol.
My top choice was Kings Econ. Its a really good course and I wanted to study in london, less so that i was opposed to going to Surrey.
For a transfer, do you just reapply through UCAS with your A level grades and grades in your first year? Also what if you dont meet the grades for that course? Wouldnt it just be better to resit the a levels for a year instead of going through a year of uni and transferring? (probably quite hectic).
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
Surrey is good enough for Masters you'll get in anywhere with a good personal statement and references and a good score. (Most ask for a 2,1) For the special cases of LSE, Oxbridge you will also need to take a GMAT or similar aptitude test as well and have over a 1st class however you will still be fine with Surrey as long as you do well on PS, references, GMAT. CV's are also looked at. Whose your firm if you don't mind me asking? (If not don't worry!)
Again as I said before you can always do a year at Surrey do well, then request a transfer to a favoured institution. Gap year is ok but if it's not LSE/Oxbridge level the jump wouldn't be too major especially if we're taking into account that you want to do a masters. The thing is at the end of the day you're going to be at the institution for 3 years so do bear that in mind with your decision. If you absolutely hate Surrey then... gap year/transfer is the choice.
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by thoxque)
How would you get 'over' a first class lol.
My top choice was Kings Econ. Its a really good course and I wanted to study in london, less so that i was opposed to going to Surrey.
For a transfer, do you just reapply through UCAS with your A level grades and grades in your first year? Also what if you dont meet the grades for that course? Wouldnt it just be better to resit the a levels for a year instead of going through a year of uni and transferring? (probably quite hectic).
Oh as in quite a few percent over 70% sorry not just a borderline 1st, my bad.
Please look at the below thread for guidance. (I've never done a transfer before sorry!)
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=1781424

If you are willing to resit A-levels that is definitely an option and quite a few of my friends did that. Have you completed your A-levels yet? If not and you do better than predicted you can always go into UCAS adjustment and apply for better universities, please see below.
https://www.ucas.com/ucas/undergradu...etter-expected
0
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#11
No, still have a month to go, currently in existential crisis mode right now!
If your still in contact with said friends, did they ever mention what it was like for them? I know its tough doing them by yourself instead of going to uni, but did they mention if it was even worthwhile? Or did it just seem like the best route at the time, are they better off now?
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
Oh as in quite a few percent over 70% sorry not just a borderline 1st, my bad.
Please look at the below thread for guidance. (I've never done a transfer before sorry!)
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=1781424

If you are willing to resit A-levels that is definitely an option and quite a few of my friends did that. Have you completed your A-levels yet? If not and you do better than predicted you can always go into UCAS adjustment and apply for better universities, please see below.
https://www.ucas.com/ucas/undergradu...etter-expected
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by thoxque)
No, still have a month to go, currently in existential crisis mode right now!
If your still in contact with said friends, did they ever mention what it was like for them? I know its tough doing them by yourself instead of going to uni, but did they mention if it was even worthwhile? Or did it just seem like the best route at the time, are they better off now?
I live with one of said friends, he kind of regrets not choosing a higher university because he was unsure he was capable of being accepted elsewhere. However, he's really happy now due to the opportunities he got (Which he might not of elsewhere) and has received an offer from an engineering giant and he's been given one of the hardest dissertation topics at the University on his course due mainly to his high score (80%+) and made friends with his supervisor who is an MBE and has about ten titles to his name. (He got AAA and came to Swansea) The only issue was loneliness has most of his friends went to university. He is definitely better off at Swansea than where he would of been for sure! If you are patient enough it's definitely worth retaking your A-levels. Although if I was in the situation I'd just go into Surrey. (However, my uni is lower than Surrey for Business so am biased!)
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 1 week ago
0
reply
Joleee
  • Forum Helper
Badges: 18
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
hi fyi i moved your thread to the Postgraduate applications forum
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 week ago
#14
(Original post by thoxque)
Im currently in my last year of A levels and am just thinking ahead for my studies beyond my degree. I am aiming to pursue a masters course in my chosen degree and am curious as to how the application process works for post-graduate courses? For top tier universities, what do they generally look at when choosing candidates (is it good A level grades? GCSEs? Which uni you went to or what course you did)? Does it really matter if you dont have good grades at A level or GCSE but still get predicted a first or high 2:1? Will not having some of these reduce your chances of getting an offer for a post-grad course?
Normally directly apply straight to each Uni (with an associated fee), it dpends if its a taught or research based course.
-Taught courses generally pretty easy to get into, 2.1 or 1st (uni dependant, in a relevant degree)
-Research courses, can be moderate to very competitive, high academic achievement 1st overall, strong disso grade, excellent references ambitious... (also you generally need to apply for funding as well, which can be hard)
0
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#15
so if you were applying to a taught course with a 2.1 or a 1st in a very relevant course (at a good but not top uni) would you find it hard to get an offer for a top uni grad-course? ( like LSE/imperial/warwick)?
(Original post by mnot)
Normally directly apply straight to each Uni (with an associated fee), it dpends if its a taught or research based course.
-Taught courses generally pretty easy to get into, 2.1 or 1st (uni dependant, in a relevant degree)
-Research courses, can be moderate to very competitive, high academic achievement 1st overall, strong disso grade, excellent references ambitious... (also you generally need to apply for funding as well, which can be hard)
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 week ago
#16
(Original post by mnot)
Normally directly apply straight to each Uni (with an associated fee), it dpends if its a taught or research based course.
-Taught courses generally pretty easy to get into, 2.1 or 1st (uni dependant, in a relevant degree)
-Research courses, can be moderate to very competitive, high academic achievement 1st overall, strong disso grade, excellent references ambitious... (also you generally need to apply for funding as well, which can be hard)
To add to this the government only offers £10,280 for Masters and PHD £25,000. I am doing a distance learning course and I still need to add my own money from my job to pay for the fees of £12,000. You would definitely need even a scholarship or own funding of some description to help. For example, taught courses are extremely expensive at LSE, Oxbridge and Imperial. £42,000 at Oxford for MSc in Financial Economics.
0
reply
thoxque
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#17
Wow, that is a lot. Surely its a good investment though? Cant be worth that much if you dont get much out of it!
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
To add to this the government only offers £10,280 for Masters and PHD £25,000. I am doing a distance learning course and I still need to add my own money from my job to pay for the fees of £12,000. You would definitely need even a scholarship or own funding of some description to help. For example, taught courses are extremely expensive at LSE, Oxbridge and Imperial. £42,000 at Oxford for MSc in Financial Economics.
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 week ago
#18
(Original post by thoxque)
so if you were applying to a taught course with a 2.1 or a 1st in a very relevant course (at a good but not top uni) would you find it hard to get an offer for a top uni grad-course? ( like LSE/imperial/warwick)?
1st Class for LSE and Imperial both at £28,000+ and 2,1 for Warwick £22,000. Surrey is fine the most important part is getting the right grade then ps, references etc. Your main threat is definitely fees, rather than University...
0
reply
Themysticalegg
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 week ago
#19
(Original post by thoxque)
Wow, that is a lot. Surely its a good investment though? Cant be worth that much if you dont get much out of it!
Business Schools have always been notoriously expensive as they are a massive money maker due to the fees international students are willing to pay for them. In terms of a good investment it depends on what you want to do and whether the job requires a MSc/PhD. However, I will always emphasis the power of work experience in getting a well paid job if that's the main goal you're going for from further study at Masters level. If you have the financial power to afford these courses then by all means go for it! If I am getting an MBA my employer can pay for it tbh!
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 1 week ago
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 week ago
#20
(Original post by thoxque)
so if you were applying to a taught course with a 2.1 or a 1st in a very relevant course (at a good but not top uni) would you find it hard to get an offer for a top uni grad-course? ( like LSE/imperial/warwick)?
LSE/Imperial probably will want a first.
-Also applying early is important, Post-grad works first come first served to a certain degree.

-Im doing an MSc atm i applied 12/13 months before the course start date and either got asked for a 2.1 or unconditional offer at: UCL,Warwick,Nottingham,Southampt on... and i was on track for a 1st so i came away from the process thinking post-grad application stuff was much easier than undergrad.
-from chatting to other other post-grads, if you are on track for a 1st @ undergrad its generally very easy.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • University of East Anglia
    Could you inspire the next generation? Find out more about becoming a Primary teacher with UEA… Postgraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care; Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Business and Law; Science and Engineering Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (552)
37.81%
No - but I will (115)
7.88%
No - I don't want to (102)
6.99%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (691)
47.33%

Watched Threads

View All