Difference between undergrad & postgrad? Watch

vanessa.queen
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may sound silly, but I'm clueless
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
may sound silly, but I'm clueless
Same and I'm enrolling on one. I guess more independent research, less spoon feeding and more work!
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gjd800
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higher pass thresholds, more reading, more writing, higher quality of independent work expected, higher quality of argumentation expected. Usually the module choice will be slightly different (in our place it's more based on the reasearch of whomever is leading the module, which is really cool).
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by gjd800)
higher pass thresholds, more reading, more writing, higher quality of independent work expected, higher quality of argumentation expected. Usually the module choice will be slightly different (in our place it's more based on the reasearch of whomever is leading the module, which is really cool).
That is really cool, getting the biggest expert on the field! My favourite part of my postgrad will be the dissertation I can finally talk about Wales and it excites me so much for some reason. (Never had the chance to do one for my undergrad, I was given a final year project instead. )
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gjd800
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
That is really cool! My favourite part is the dissertation I can finally talk about Wales and it excites me so much for some reason. (Never had the chance to do one for my undergrad, I was given a final year project instead. )
I was excited for the dissertation, too—I knew what it would be before I even started the course, so when it came to writing it, I was done super fast.
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by gjd800)
I was excited for the dissertation, too -- I knew what it would be before I even started the course, so when it came to writing it, I was done super fast.
Same I have a very good idea about my passion and have multiple titles in my head. The only issue is since I'm working on my masters part time I will have to sit on the idea for 2 years but will prepare for it so I can also write it very quickly!
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
may sound silly, but I'm clueless
I don't know if this is what you're asking but I was confused about this!

Undergraduate = bachelors degrees, e.g., BAs or BScs

Postgraduate = the course you do after you've graduated from university, e.g, MAs, MSc, PhD etc.

Normally you would need an undergrad degree in order to do a postgrad - some courses you enter at undergrad level, but are longer and you'll come out with a master's degree. However generally the first three years are the undergrad component and the masters is added on as the final year if this makes sense.
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vanessa.queen
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Yes thank you! So you can do a masters when applying to uni after sixth form, right?
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searching123job
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
Yes thank you! So you can do a masters when applying to uni after sixth form, right?
No

But if you are talking of applying for like an MSci, then yes, which is basically a 4 year integrated masters course
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
Yes thank you! So you can do a masters when applying to uni after sixth form, right?
If my understanding is correct you're talking about a integrated masters where you apply for example for a course such as MEng Aerospace Engineering where you're automatically enrolled for the Bachelors and Masters course at the ucas stage? Not many courses do this as far as I'm aware but it depends heavily on the course, I know for Eng it's common.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
Yes thank you! So you can do a masters when applying to uni after sixth form, right?
You can't apply to do a masters directly - you will need an undergraduate degree first UNLESS it's a (usually) four year course e.g., a Bachelors degree + Masters.

What course are you thinking of applying to? They should let you know what the entry requirements are
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vanessa.queen
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I'm planning on doing computer science and there is the bsc and msci, I plan on doing msci although is there much of a difference between bsc and msci apart from the extra year?
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
I'm planning on doing computer science and there is the bsc and msci, I plan on doing msci although is there much of a difference between bsc and msci apart from the extra year?
Ahhhhh CS (I'm not of that background), Blue_Cow sorry to bother you would you know what the main differences are? I assume at MSc you can specialise more into exactly what you want to study such as Artificial Intelligence or machine learning. My assumption would be the MSc goes more into detail than the BSc with more emphasis on independent research. However, it depends what type of career you want, you may not even need the MSc? Also bear in mind if you take an integrated course it means you're at the same university for 4 years, and some people like to change for their Masters. So you could enrol for a BSc somewhere and then if you still want to study for an MSc apply in the final year of your Bachelors' studies. (Hope that made sense)
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
I'm planning on doing computer science and there is the bsc and msci, I plan on doing msci although is there much of a difference between bsc and msci apart from the extra year?
(Original post by Themysticalegg)
Ahhhhh CS (I'm not of that background), Blue_Cow sorry to bother you would you know what the main differences are? I assume at MSc you can specialise more into exactly what you want to study such as Artificial Intelligence or machine learning. My assumption would be the MSc goes more into detail than the BSc with more emphasis on independent research. However, it depends what type of career you want, you may not even need the MSc? Also bear in mind if you take an integrated course it means you're at the same university for 4 years, and some people like to change for their Masters. So you could enrol for a BSc somewhere and then if you still want to study for an MSc apply in the final year of your Bachelors' studies. (Hope that made sense)
It's no bother :rofl: Thanks for the tag, PRSOM as usual

Vanessa, it depends on the uni. Some will have a slight variation during the honours years (check the course webpage, or consult the university directly). But for the most part, it is just that extra year for Masters level research/programming project.

Apply for the MSci if you're interested. Much easier to drop down to the BSc once you're at uni if you want to change your mind.
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vanessa.queen
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ok thanks, I'm thinking of going into software engineering and so some courses are specialised in that field so I may go down the route of a bachelor and then a master somewhere else although when applying for a masters degree what do they look at? A levels or uni grades? idk the uni exam system soz
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Themysticalegg
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(Original post by vanessa.queen)
ok thanks, I'm thinking of going into software engineering and so some courses are specialised in that field so I may go down the route of a bachelor and then a master somewhere else although when applying for a masters degree what do they look at? A levels or uni grades? idk the uni exam system soz
They look at your university grades, generally universities ask for 60% or over (2,1) some of the top ones like Imperial will ask for over 70% (1st class) They will not look at your A-level grades, however your A-level grades will be a key part of what University you will end up at for your Bachelors. They will focus on what your academic references such as lecturers/tutors say about you and your personal statement at the Masters stage. (There really is no need to worry about this at this stage.)

Thanks! Blue_Cow
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vanessa.queen
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Thank you all so much x appreciate the help!
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