Should all unis provide free tampons? Watch

Poll: Should all unis provide free tampons?
Yes (97)
58.79%
No (68)
41.21%
candokoala
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Daisy Wakefield, a UWE student, has spent £100 of her student loan on tampons for fellow students to tackle the "urgent issue" of period poverty at the uni.

She said she was forced to take action as she was "tired" of the university "not addressing the crisis".

It is Daisy's opinion that "all universities need to provide support and actually invest money to finally put an end to period poverty."

Some universities - including Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Exeter - already provide sanitary products for students who are in need.

UWE said: "Period poverty is a global issue and we're pleased UWE Bristol students are passionately advocating for change.

"The university does not currently supply free sanitary products on campus, though we would be pleased to meet with students to understand if there is an emerging need for this."

Secondary schools will be providing free sanitary products from September. Should unis follow suit?

BBC article here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-47919533
Last edited by candokoala; 1 week ago
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Andrew97
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No.
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the bear
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if so then male students should be provided with shaving equipment as well.
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z-hog
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The so-called education system is turning people into things.
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z-hog
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(Original post by the bear)
if so then male students should be provided with shaving equipment as well.
Condoms even!
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the bear
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#endshavingpovertynow
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z-hog
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UWE said: "Period poverty is a global issue and we're pleased UWE Bristol students are passionately advocating for change.
Cue violins and robe-wearing procession of bodies singing Hallelujah. Today we're going to save the world and everybody in it whether they want it or not.
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jameswhughes
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How do you cope at university (or in life for that matter) if you can't manage to buy a box of tampons for £3 at Tesco?

If you need this level of supervision you should be back in primary school. :lol:
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Molseh
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I'm a bloke, but the fact that women have to pay for these anywhere is a travesty.
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EmCharles
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No, the government should deal with period poverty. It's a humanitarian issue.
That said, it would be nice if they offered help to those who may need it. You can reuse a shaving blade, you don't have to have sex, but you can't stop the dark forces that be a period.
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harrysbar
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I think that sanitary products should be excempt from VAT, but it seems a bit gimmicky to suggest that unis should provide them for free to everyone - after all, not everyone suffers from "period poverty" and a fair number of students at UWE and other unis will be from richer than average families. Schools often provide them for free for pupils in financial hardship (as they should), but that's different.

I'm a bit cynical but suspect that Daisy is studying Law, Politics or something like that and wanted to do something that yes, was in a good cause but also would help her fledgling career. What a great thing to have on her CV
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Reue
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No, why should other students have to subsidise it? All that will happen is universities will increase their fees or reduce spending elsewhere to fund it.
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Trotsky's Iceaxe
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I've never understood why people object to free sanitary products but never to free toilet roll.

Those self-sufficient libertarians who value personal responsibility should be carrying around their own toilet paper rather than expecting it to be provided for free on campus.
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Joinedup
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What about apprentices or women in minimum wage jobs?

How much extra mollycoddling should we be giving uni students compared to vulnerable groups in the rest of society?
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ThomH97
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If £1 a month for sanitary products is the difference between just about getting by at university and starving to death because you haven't been able to buy that £1 extra of food that was just about keeping you alive, I think there are bigger issues to look at.

Those in need do need more financial help (by definition), but why limit help to such a tiny amount of money that will be the difference between attending and not attending university to virtually nobody?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Trotsky's Iceaxe)
I've never understood why people object to free sanitary products but never to free toilet roll.

Those self-sufficient libertarians who value personal responsibility should be carrying around their own toilet paper rather than expecting it to be provided for free on campus.
Because it's a fair point that if women expect all sanitary products to be free for everyone, why shouldn't men expect the same for shaving equipment? And they wouldn't really be free anyway, since we would all end up paying for them one way or another. I think it's more sensible just to have free supplies for those in any kind of financial hardship
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DarthRoar
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No. If the government/university supplies tampons then why not toilet paper, and then why not other necessities like soap and shampoo too? After all, we don't want soap poverty! And then why not have them supply other necessary items like clothing and food. And housing. Oh, and while we're at it, why not seize the means of production and form the wonderful communist dystopia?

What makes tampons so special? If we're providing that, then why not everything else above?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by ThomH97)
If £1 a month for sanitary products is the difference between just about getting by at university and starving to death because you haven't been able to buy that £1 extra of food that was just about keeping you alive, I think there are bigger issues to look at.

Those in need do need more financial help (by definition), but why limit help to such a tiny amount of money that will be the difference between attending and not attending university to virtually nobody?
Couldn't really make sense of your point but sanitary products for women cost more than £1 a month fyi
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Trotsky's Iceaxe
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Because it's a fair point that if women expect all sanitary products to be free for everyone, why shouldn't men expect the same for shaving equipment? And they wouldn't really be free anyway, since we would all end up paying for them one way or another. I think it's more sensible just to have free supplies for those in any kind of financial hardship
You think sanitary products and shaving products are comparable?

I suggest you talk to women about periods. You have so much to learn.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Trotsky's Iceaxe)
You think sanitary products and shaving products are comparable?

I suggest you talk to women about periods. You have so much to learn.
I am a woman
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