'I'll quit before my job kills me' - Teachers Watch

StrawberryDreams
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-47936211

Four out of ten teachers are planning to quit the education sector in the next five years, says the National Education Union, and they're blaming excessive workloads and accountability for the problem.

The government has said that that reducing teacher workload is a big part of the new recruitment and retention strategy, but is it too little, too late? Recruitment targets for new teachers have been missed for five years in a row now, and 26% of new teachers have a negative outlook on the role and do not expect to stay in education for longer than five years.

What do you think about the latest findings? Do you think this just cements what we already know, or do you think it means something needs to be done quicker?
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limetang
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(Original post by StrawberryDreams)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-47936211

Four out of ten teachers are planning to quit the education sector in the next five years, says the National Education Union, and they're blaming excessive workloads and accountability for the problem.

The government has said that that reducing teacher workload is a big part of the new recruitment and retention strategy, but is it too little, too late? Recruitment targets for new teachers have been missed for five years in a row now, and 26% of new teachers have a negative outlook on the role and do not expect to stay in education for longer than five years.

What do you think about the latest findings? Do you think this just cements what we already know, or do you think it means something needs to be done quicker?
I think a fundamental problem is that it's not viewed as a serious job, either by government or by society at large. As an example of this, pay progression is minuscule compared to most graduate jobs (especially for STEM graduates).

A classroom teacher (who hasn't taken on any additional TLR's etc.) with 10 years experience will be on around £40k a year. While obviously not common, I know of some people in their first job out of university who are making that much. Fiddling around with pay rises isn't going to change the fundamental fact that the pay just doesn't match the importance of the job.
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