Have exam boards ever asked questions that r not in the spec?

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username2427341
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Hey, so I know the answer to the title is obvious. But in some of my subjects such as in psychology, in the topic schizophrenia, I've been taught stuff that are not mentioned in the spec, but my friend says we need to know them so I'm kinda confused. Should I learn the stuff that are not in the spec?
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username3492572
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no.

in class most people learn excess information but teachers do this to help make the concepts easier for students to understand...i would stick with the specification (also use the textbook approved by your exam board) and focus on what you really need to learn not excess info otherwise you will forget what is important

hope that helps
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by *Alisha*)
Hey, so I know the answer to the title is obvious. But in some of my subjects such as in psychology, in the topic schizophrenia, I've been taught stuff that are not mentioned in the spec, but my friend says we need to know them so I'm kinda confused. Should I learn the stuff that are not in the spec?
When you say it's not mentioned in the spec, could it be covered by something like "Students need to know examples of X"? Sometimes the spec is a bit vague, but teachers have an idea of what is needed.

Exam boards can't ask questions that are completely different to the specification, but they can ask you to apply your knowledge to new situations, especially at A-level. This may be relevant to the information.

If you're unsure, I wouldn't focus too much on this for the moment, and it might be worth asking your teacher about it when you're back at school.
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barror1
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I actually did get an off spec question in my (real and final)English Language exam last year. It taught me that you need to be able to adapt to as many questions as possible in case the worst comes to the worst.
Definitely learn the content :yes:
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username2427341
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(Original post by seconda1)
no.

in class most people learn excess information but teachers do this to help make the concepts easier for students to understand...i would stick with the specification (also use the textbook approved by your exam board) and focus on what you really need to learn not excess info otherwise you will forget what is important

hope that helps
Oh ok thanks, was about to learn all the other symptoms of schizophrenia but we only need to know delusions, hallucinations, avolition and speech poverty
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
When you say it's not mentioned in the spec, could it be covered by something like "Students need to know examples of X"? Sometimes the spec is a bit vague, but teachers have an idea of what is needed.

Exam boards can't ask questions that are completely different to the specification, but they can ask you to apply your knowledge to new situations, especially at A-level. This may be relevant to the information.

If you're unsure, I wouldn't focus too much on this for the moment, and it might be worth asking your teacher about it when you're back at school.
Yes, in the spec they've given examples of what I need to know.
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(Original post by barror1)
I actually did get an off spec question in my (real and final)English Language exam last year. It taught me that you need to be able to adapt to as many questions as possible in case the worst comes to the worst.
Definitely learn the content :yes:
Was it for the AQA board? And was it like a big part of the exam?
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barror1
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(Original post by *Alisha*)
Was it for the AQA board?
Yup! It was on political correctness for section 2 of paper 2, the final questions!
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username3983032
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In my psychology experience, the specs are ambiguous enough to allow non- spec content on the exam. Edexcel psych is ridiculous, they also require you to talk about non-spec things to get all the marks e.g. supporting studies! It’s a joke, have fun!
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(Original post by DrWilson173441)
In my psychology experience, the specs are ambiguous enough to allow non- spec content on the exam. Edexcel psych is ridiculous, they also require you to talk about non-spec things to get all the marks e.g. supporting studies! It’s a joke, have fun!
Do you not have to learn studies? Luckyyy
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Oh no we do, they just expect us to learn big studies and a few extras. Then the markschemes turn round a f*** you over. On my AS exam they asked an 8 mark question about Cadoret and Stewart, I was like WTF, I came out and told my teachers and they weren’t suprise. So I looked in my booklets and there was a space litterally and inch in height dedicated to the study. I couldn’t believe it!
(Original post by *Alisha*)
Do you not have to learn studies? Luckyyy
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(Original post by DrWilson173441)
Oh no we do, they just expect us to learn big studies and a few extras. Then the markschemes turn round a f*** you over. On my AS exam they asked an 8 mark question about Cadoret and Stewart, I was like WTF, I came out and told my teachers and they weren’t suprise. So I looked in my booklets and there was a space litterally and inch in height dedicated to the study. I couldn’t believe it!
Peakk, my exam board (AQA) would just ask ''outline and evaluate a research into..." but wouldn't specify which study. Make sure you learn the big studies.
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