What requirements there are to become a biologist? Watch

WoTiFix
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I am only 15 and i still need to do my GCSES but I am very interested in biology and I want to take it further but I want to know what I need to do and have to become a biologist. For ex how many gcses and what gcses subjects I need to pass and what a levels I should take so I can take biology in university for a degree.
This might sound too much for me but I am very confused.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by WoTiFix)
I am only 15 and i still need to do my GCSES but I am very interested in biology and I want to take it further but I want to know what I need to do and have to become a biologist. For ex how many gcses and what gcses subjects I need to pass and what a levels I should take so I can take biology in university for a degree.
This might sound too much for me but I am very confused.
You should aim to get the best gcse science grades and maths and english. You'll need biology a level, and another science like physics or chemistry would be a good idea if not then some universities would take biology with something like psychology, sociology or geography.
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RegisteredBMS
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You should have a little read around about what you actually want to do. Biologist is quite a vague term.
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That'sGreat
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I don't think you know what a 'biologist' is
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WoTiFix
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LOL ik I didn't mention a specific biologist job but I am talking about marine biologist or generally biologists that work around animals
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WoTiFix
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Yh i am talking about biologists that generally work around animals can be marine or zoologist
(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
You should have a little read around about what you actually want to do. Biologist is quite a vague term.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by WoTiFix)
I am only 15 and i still need to do my GCSES but I am very interested in biology and I want to take it further but I want to know what I need to do and have to become a biologist. For ex how many gcses and what gcses subjects I need to pass and what a levels I should take so I can take biology in university for a degree.
This might sound too much for me but I am very confused.
the requirement is to be clinically insane.

and to have a PhD and nothing less.

(i did a biology degree)
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RegisteredBMS
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Nothing funny about it, the route to different jobs in the broad field of biology vary massively and without that information people can't help.
(Original post by WoTiFix)
LOL ik I didn't mention a specific biologist job but I am talking about marine biologist or generally biologists that work around animals
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rubyft123
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I'm gonna go out on a limb here but I think you're probably going to need biology lmao
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BlueIndigoViolet
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Biology, Further Biology and Futher Additional Biology
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Lutra_
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Most universities will want Biology and at least one other science subject at A Level. People often choose Chemistry because it helps with understanding how biology works at the molecular level, but I would think that Maths or something related to Computer Science could be really useful too. Biology graduates need to have a solid understanding of statistics, and workplaces increasingly need people who understand how to code.

They'll also want a third A level, which can often be in anything (Check the requirements of the universities you're interested in). You'd be surprised by the range of subjects that could complement your science knowledge, so go for something you enjoy! You could go for another science, or perhaps Geography, Psychology, Philosophy, a modern language, Politics, Journalism, or even Photography.

I personally did Biology, Chemistry, Spanish and General Studies at A Level, and Maths at AS Level. Then I did a degree in Biology with Spanish at university, I worked in a scientific research lab for a couple of years, and I'm going to start a PhD relating to plant science soon.

You probably want to make sure you do a GCSE in any subject you want to do at A level, since it means you already have some knowledge about the subject.

(Original post by WoTiFix)
LOL ik I didn't mention a specific biologist job but I am talking about marine biologist or generally biologists that work around animals
You should probably do some research into what Biology-related jobs are actually available, and what those jobs actually involve. It's totally fine to not know for sure what you want to do at 15 (I honestly had NO clue, my choices were made by what I felt would keep my options the most open and what I enjoyed) but researching your options now will make things less stressful for future you.

Jobs that work with charismatic animals are few and far between, and they don't pay particularly well. Most marine biologists will work with plankton or fisheries or something, rather than spending their days scuba diving with dolphins. I don't say this to be a downer, but to ensure you don't blindly chase a job that might not live up to your expectations.

Generally speaking if you want to go into scientific research you need to do GCSEs and A Levels at school, do an undergraduate university degree in your subject, maybe do a masters, then do a PhD (which is another 3-4 year degree, but this time working on a research project finding out new information rather than attending lectures and writing essays).
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A Rolling Stone
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excellent post. 9.7 out of 10... the 0.3 was for downplaying the fact that you 100% NEED a PhD to have any realistic chance of a well paid career in the field the OP is interested in.
(Original post by Lutra_)
Most universities will want Biology and at least one other science subject at A Level. People often choose Chemistry because it helps with understanding how biology works at the molecular level, but I would think that Maths or something related to Computer Science could be really useful too. Biology graduates need to have a solid understanding of statistics, and workplaces increasingly need people who understand how to code.

They'll also want a third A level, which can often be in anything (Check the requirements of the universities you're interested in). You'd be surprised by the range of subjects that could complement your science knowledge, so go for something you enjoy! You could go for another science, or perhaps Geography, Psychology, Philosophy, a modern language, Politics, Journalism, or even Photography.

I personally did Biology, Chemistry, Spanish and General Studies at A Level, and Maths at AS Level. Then I did a degree in Biology with Spanish at university, I worked in a scientific research lab for a couple of years, and I'm going to start a PhD relating to plant science soon.

You probably want to make sure you do a GCSE in any subject you want to do at A level, since it means you already have some knowledge about the subject.



You should probably do some research into what Biology-related jobs are actually available, and what those jobs actually involve. It's totally fine to not know for sure what you want to do at 15 (I honestly had NO clue, my choices were made by what I felt would keep my options the most open and what I enjoyed) but researching your options now will make things less stressful for future you.

Jobs that work with charismatic animals are few and far between, and they don't pay particularly well. Most marine biologists will work with plankton or fisheries or something, rather than spending their days scuba diving with dolphins. I don't say this to be a downer, but to ensure you don't blindly chase a job that might not live up to your expectations.

Generally speaking if you want to go into scientific research you need to do GCSEs and A Levels at school, do an undergraduate university degree in your subject, maybe do a masters, then do a PhD (which is another 3-4 year degree, but this time working on a research project finding out new information rather than attending lectures and writing essays).
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WoTiFix
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I rlly don't want to do maths for alevels I am not good at it and I feel like I can't take bio bz of this reason but do I have to choose maths? can you give me some other subject I can do
(Original post by Lutra_)
Most universities will want Biology and at least one other science subject at A Level. People often choose Chemistry because it helps with understanding how biology works at the molecular level, but I would think that Maths or something related to Computer Science could be really useful too. Biology graduates need to have a solid understanding of statistics, and workplaces increasingly need people who understand how to code.

They'll also want a third A level, which can often be in anything (Check the requirements of the universities you're interested in). You'd be surprised by the range of subjects that could complement your science knowledge, so go for something you enjoy! You could go for another science, or perhaps Geography, Psychology, Philosophy, a modern language, Politics, Journalism, or even Photography.

I personally did Biology, Chemistry, Spanish and General Studies at A Level, and Maths at AS Level. Then I did a degree in Biology with Spanish at university, I worked in a scientific research lab for a couple of years, and I'm going to start a PhD relating to plant science soon.

You probably want to make sure you do a GCSE in any subject you want to do at A level, since it means you already have some knowledge about the subject.



You should probably do some research into what Biology-related jobs are actually available, and what those jobs actually involve. It's totally fine to not know for sure what you want to do at 15 (I honestly had NO clue, my choices were made by what I felt would keep my options the most open and what I enjoyed) but researching your options now will make things less stressful for future you.

Jobs that work with charismatic animals are few and far between, and they don't pay particularly well. Most marine biologists will work with plankton or fisheries or something, rather than spending their days scuba diving with dolphins. I don't say this to be a downer, but to ensure you don't blindly chase a job that might not live up to your expectations.

Generally speaking if you want to go into scientific research you need to do GCSEs and A Levels at school, do an undergraduate university degree in your subject, maybe do a masters, then do a PhD (which is another 3-4 year degree, but this time working on a research project finding out new information rather than attending lectures and writing essays).
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RegisteredBMS
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Why don't you instead look at the requirements of the courses that you want to do, they're well publicised on their website. The entry requirements for the vast array of courses within the field of Biology will vary significantly.
(Original post by WoTiFix)
I rlly don't want to do maths for alevels I am not good at it and I feel like I can't take bio bz of this reason but do I have to choose maths? can you give me some other subject I can do
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Lutra_
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(Original post by WoTiFix)
I rlly don't want to do maths for alevels I am not good at it and I feel like I can't take bio bz of this reason but do I have to choose maths? can you give me some other subject I can do
You don't have to do maths at A Level.

You will need to get to a stage where you're comfortable with basic maths and statistics if you want to work in a Biology-related field, but there's no rush. Plenty of Biology students don't do A level Maths.

As I said, generally universities want three A levels:

  • Biology
  • Another science subject or maths
  • The last subject can usually be whatever you like.

That said, it's really important to check the requirements of the universities you're interested in. They all have different ideas of which subjects are "sciences" (E.g. Sheffield's Biology department thinks Geology is a Science, while P.E isn't. Manchester's Biology department thinks P.E is a science, while Geology isn't. Durham's Biology department doesn't think either Geology or P.E are sciences.), and there's a chance some universities might have requirements for what you take as your third A level too.
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WoTiFix
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Also one more thing sorry I replied late. But do you have to do A levels or you can do other things like BTEC and stuff
(Original post by Lutra_)
You don't have to do maths at A Level.

You will need to get to a stage where you're comfortable with basic maths and statistics if you want to work in a Biology-related field, but there's no rush. Plenty of Biology students don't do A level Maths.

As I said, generally universities want three A levels:

  • Biology
  • Another science subject or maths
  • The last subject can usually be whatever you like.

That said, it's really important to check the requirements of the universities you're interested in. They all have different ideas of which subjects are "sciences" (E.g. Sheffield's Biology department thinks Geology is a Science, while P.E isn't. Manchester's Biology department thinks P.E is a science, while Geology isn't. Durham's Biology department doesn't think either Geology or P.E are sciences.), and there's a chance some universities might have requirements for what you take as your third A level too.
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Scotney
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What sort of job do you want.
(Original post by WoTiFix)
Also one more thing sorry I replied late. But do you have to do A levels or you can do other things like BTEC and stuff
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WoTiFix
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Working with animals or research
(Original post by Scotney)
What sort of job do you want.
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Scotney
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You really need a levels to be zoologist or research biologist. Certainly do not have to have maths as people have already said. But you could do other jobs that work with animals eg vet nurse, dog groomer that do not require A levels.
(Original post by WoTiFix)
Working with animals or research
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Scotney
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Have a look at Anglia Ruskins Animal Sciences web page as it outlines some Btecs that you might like which lead to a degree. Reading Animal Science also looks interesting.
(Original post by WoTiFix)
Working with animals or research
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