Biomedical science specialism Watch

anix94
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I will be graduating this summer and still unsure of what I want to do next. I’ve a great interest in both haematology & transfusion science and immunology. I think I’d be interested most in working as a specialised biomedical scientist in NHS blood and transplant.

My question is, would a masters in either clinical immunology or haematology get me into a specialised biomedical scientist role? Or is there another route? I’ve searched for biomedical scientist specialist jobs for both immunology and jobs in NHSBT, and the requirements generally include a specialist qualification, so would this be a masters?
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RegisteredBMS
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Unfortunately you're quite far off track .

Firstly, I'm assuming you have an IBMS accredited degree. You need to seek a rare and elusive 'Trainee Biomedical Scientist' job in order to obtain HCPC registration. You cannot become a 'Specialist Biomedical Scientist' straight from the off, that requires in-job training. You have mistook what the 'Specialist' qualification is. It's the IBMS Specialist Diploma, something that can only be done whilst you're working as a Biomedical Scientist already.

You're welcome to do an MSc, but it isn't what you require to be a Specialist Biomedical Scientist. HCPC registration is what you need to concentrating on acquiring first.
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anix94
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Unfortunately you're quite far off track and it's quite late to realise.

Firstly, I'm assuming you have an IBMS accredited degree. You need to seek a rare and elusive 'Trainee Biomedical Scientist' job in order to obtain HCPC registration. You cannot become a 'Specialist Biomedical Scientist' straight from the off, that requires in-job training. You have mistook what the 'Specialist' qualification is. It's the IBMS Specialist Diploma, something that can only be done whilst you're working as a Biomedical Scientist already.

You're welcome to do an MSc, but it isn't what you require to be a Specialist Biomedical Scientist. HCPC registration is what you need to concentrating on acquiring first.
I’ve not been given the correct information by the careers advisor then lol. What jobs can a MSc in clinical immunology or in Haematology lead to then?
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by anix94)
I’ve not been given the correct information by the careers advisor then lol. What jobs can a MSc in clinical immunology or in Haematology lead to then?
This is unfortunately quite common. Careers advisors know generic information. I recently saw a Q&A on here from one who said that doing Pharmacology can lead to being a Biomedical Scientist or a Healthcare Scientist when that would be an unsuitable degree and secondly, they're the same job with a different title which the adviser seemed unaware of.

In regards to where them MSc's can lead you, pretty much any scientific job within that field except for being a Biomedical Scientist. If being a BMS is what you want to do then you need a Trainee post, which require NHS experience on the job spec, so you'd have to enter the NHS at entry-level as a Band 2 MLA.
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anix94
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
This is unfortunately quite common. Careers advisors know generic information. I recently saw a Q&A on here from one who said that doing Pharmacology can lead to being a Biomedical Scientist or a Healthcare Scientist when that would be an unsuitable degree and secondly, they're the same job with a different title which the adviser seemed unaware of.

In regards to where them MSc's can lead you, pretty much any scientific job within that field except for being a Biomedical Scientist. If being a BMS is what you want to do then you need a Trainee post, which require NHS experience on the job spec, so you'd have to enter the NHS at entry-level as a Band 2 MLA.
Would you know if there’s another way of becoming a clinical scientist other than through the NHS STP?

Thank you so much for the help btw!
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RegisteredBMS
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The STP is the only way, that's a different career to a Biomedical Scientist (people often confuse them).

A Clinical Scientist is more office based, interpreting results and discussing them with medics. Not all disciplines use them.
(Original post by anix94)
Would you know if there’s another way of becoming a clinical scientist other than through the NHS STP?

Thank you so much for the help btw!
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