Hooke's Law Dilemma Watch

AshKetchum1206
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As everyone knows that He stated, "The extension is directly proportional to the force applied [on the spring]".

However, I encountered a question given by my teacher showing a x-force, y-extension graph and has several coordinates labelled.
This is confusing me though, because the question asks "At which point on this graph does the extension stop being proportional to the force?"

Moreover, after (5,5), the line started to curve, going almost parabolic.

Thus, if the ext dp to N, how is it realistically possible for it to bend?

I am so stuck so can someone please guide me.

Thanks in advance!
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Anonymouspsych
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(Original post by AshKetchum1206)
As everyone knows that He stated, "The extension is directly proportional to the force applied [on the spring]".

However, I encountered a question given by my teacher showing a x-force, y-extension graph and has several coordinates labelled.
This is confusing me though, because the question asks "At which point on this graph does the extension stop being proportional to the force?"

Moreover, after (5,5), the line started to curve, going almost parabolic.

Thus, if the ext dp to N, how is it realistically possible for it to bend?

I am so stuck so can someone please guide me.

Thanks in advance!
Hooke's Law is only obeyed until a point on the graph called the limit of proportionality. Beyond this point, the extension of the specimen is no longer directly proportional to the applied force and the graph becomes curved.

So in the context of your question, it sounds like the limit of proportionality would have coordinates somewhere close to (5,5) so beyond this point the extension is not proportional to the force.
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AshKetchum1206
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Oh! Thanks for the support!
(Original post by Anonymouspsych)
Hooke's Law is only obeyed until a point on the graph called the limit of proportionality. Beyond this point, the extension of the specimen is no longer directly proportional to the applied force and the graph becomes curved.

So in the context of your question, it sounds like the limit of proportionality would have coordinates somewhere close to (5,5) so beyond this point the extension is not proportional to the force.
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