Questions about the LNAT

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mhm212
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#1
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#1
Hello!
I hope that I'm posting in the right forum, but I wanted to ask some questions about the LNAT.
As I'm a non-native English speaker, is it worth it starting to prepare from an earlier stage so that I can develop my vocabulary further for the exam?
There are many books aimed at preapring students for the exam, but are they actually useful?(I'd also really appreciate some reccomendations if so)
In general, how much time does it take for a student to prepare to take the exam, and do you think there is a grand difference between the time required by a native speaker and a non-native one?
I've also checked the official LNAT website-is it really true that keeping up with the news/current events and doing practise tests is enough to actually prepare?
I'm sorry for the lackluster of questions and I hope that it makes sense. Thanks in advance for any answers!
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Assembly
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#2
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#2
Hey Mhm212,

I would definitely suggest early preparation if you are a not a native English speaker. The LNAT requires a competent level of reading comprehension; a large part of this is understanding how and why certain words are in a particular order to derive the correct meaning in relation to the question. I say this because the LNAT often asks questions with very particular wording that applies to a very specific area of the passage; a lot of the answers will seem correct, but you must be able to spot the subtle differences in phrasing to correctly apply them to the passage.

What can you do to prepare? Read 'Letters to a Law Student' - I cannot reccomend this book enough. I read it after I sat the LNAT and it helped me realise all of the mistakes I made when I sat the test. I wish someone recommended it to me before I sat the test. The book has a dedicated chapter to LNAT; the chapter goes through LNAT question types, strategies to answer multiple choice questions and shows you exactly how to structure an essay in response to the essay question. It's written by a Cambridge University fellow and approved by Pearson (the exam regulator).

Hope this helps & best of luck!
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mhm212
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#3
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#3
I didn’t expect such a detailed reply at all, thank you so much!
Thankfully, I still have quite a lot of time before sitting the LNAT, so I’ll definitely keep in mind all of the things you mentioned, especially about the mistakes I made(thank you for pointing them out!)
Cheers!
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mhm212
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Assembly)
Hey Mhm212,

I would definitely suggest early preparation if you are a not a native English speaker. The LNAT requires a competent level of reading comprehension; a large part of this is understanding how and why certain words are in a particular order to derive the correct meaning in relation to the question. I say this because the LNAT often asks questions with very particular wording that applies to a very specific area of the passage; a lot of the answers will seem correct, but you must be able to spot the subtle differences in phrasing to correctly apply them to the passage.

What can you do to prepare? Read 'Letters to a Law Student' - I cannot reccomend this book enough. I read it after I sat the LNAT and it helped me realise all of the mistakes I made when I sat the test. I wish someone recommended it to me before I sat the test. The book has a dedicated chapter to LNAT; the chapter goes through LNAT question types, strategies to answer multiple choice questions and shows you exactly how to structure an essay in response to the essay question. It's written by a Cambridge University fellow and approved by Pearson (the exam regulator).

Hope this helps & best of luck!
Thank you so much for the detailed reply!
I’ve already seen a lot of positive reviews about “Letters to a law student”, but you’ve definitely convinced me to read it ASAP!
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returnmigrant
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#5
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#5
Each year there are always a few questions about moral arguments connected to current news issues. So, whilst you don't need to know the background on these cases (that isn't what they are asking for) , it might help you write the 'for' and 'against' point-of-views if you are aware of them.

Recent examples are (can't remember the exact wording of the questions) :

'Should personal cannabis use be made legal so that it can be regulated and taxed'
'Is it morally acceptable for those with a hereditary disease to have children'
'Should we consider a car driven recklessly as dangerous as a gun'
'Do those with a terminal illness have the right to choose to end their life when they want to'
'Should we restrict fertility treatment only to those who are childless'
'Which should be prioritised, funding for Arts or Sport'

If you regularly read the longer articles in a UK online newspaper like The Independent, you'll get used to the way they present arguments and the type of language used. It also helps to listen to the BBC World Service to get a feel for English as it is in everyday speech not just in an English text book.

I read LNAT essays and I don't get picky about spelling or the wrong use of a word, for Overseas applicants, I just look for sensible arguments for and against the issue posed in the question, ie. have you understood the question properly and can you show that there are two sides to this argument?
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tenacity
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#6
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#6
My preparation for the LNAT consisted of reading the LNAT website guidelines as well as those published by my choices, reading the LNAT section of Nick McBride's Letters to a Law Student, doing the two practice papers on the LNAT website, reading a couple of their model essays and writing a plan for one of my own. I got 31/42 and offers from UCL, LSE and KCL. Yes, I am smug about this.

You need to have a strong command of the English language not just for the essay but for the MCQ, where questions often ask you to distinguish between several similarly worded options. Improving your English is clearly your highest priority. You don't really need specialist knowledge about anything; in the MCQ you need to be very ****ing careful about choosing the most precise answer, and in the essay you need to demonstrate conviction, strong command of language, clear structure and the ability to draw distinctions between closely tied ideas or situations and preferably in as interesting a way as possible. Having specialist knowledge about the preservation of the Egyptian manatee will help with being interesting but the rest is what you should prioritise.

I would especially recommend reading the LNAT chapter of LTALS (several times) and doing timed MCQ practice papers.
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karolinaz96
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#7
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#7
Hi ! English isnt my first language either! I did my lnat exam while at college (living in the uk for about 8 years at that time). I did not prepare.. which is so stupid. I thought i knew enough .. i knew how to answer questions and had knowledge to write answers BUT i didnt have enough knowledge to write an essay format answer! The best advice is to TIME YOURSELF, then you know what to expect from the exam itself. Find some past questions and try answering it without preparation so you can find out what you need to work on. Good Luck
(Original post by mhm212)
Hello!
I hope that I'm posting in the right forum, but I wanted to ask some questions about the LNAT.
As I'm a non-native English speaker, is it worth it starting to prepare from an earlier stage so that I can develop my vocabulary further for the exam?
There are many books aimed at preapring students for the exam, but are they actually useful?(I'd also really appreciate some reccomendations if so)
In general, how much time does it take for a student to prepare to take the exam, and do you think there is a grand difference between the time required by a native speaker and a non-native one?
I've also checked the official LNAT website-is it really true that keeping up with the news/current events and doing practise tests is enough to actually prepare?
I'm sorry for the lackluster of questions and I hope that it makes sense. Thanks in advance for any answers!
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spiros2121
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#8
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#8
Hello there!
I sat the LNAT about 4 days ago (22/4) because Bristol asked me to. I had about 9 days to prepare for the LNAT I bough an amazon book and did about a total of 7 (maybe 8) full practice tests and wrote 20 (extra) essays. I devoted all of my time within these 9 days to the LNAT (I literally did not do anything else just study) and I came to the conclusion that the most important thing in the LNAT is constantly practicing. You cannot be taught how to think critically but if you understand the structure of test you will definitely do better at it. Reading articles does not help you so don't do it its literally pointless. Do a lot of practice tests and learn how to write a good essay because if you don't do well on the reading part the essay will definitely save you.
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Thelawguy
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#9
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#9
May I ask where are you from?
I mean it’s very hard to quickly improve your English level but I guess doing more practice papers would help
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spiros2121
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Thelawguy)
May I ask where are you from?
I mean it’s very hard to quickly improve your English level but I guess doing more practice papers would help
I'm from Greece I got a 7.5 overall on IELTS with 7 on writing. The LNAT tries to confuse you with complicated words that are pretty much "useless" most times (regarding the questions) you just have to be 100% focused however after 8-9 passages you will be bored but you gotta keep up. Practice tests are the key to the lnat and really try and focus on the essay part it can save you.
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username3731912
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#11
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#11
(Original post by spiros2121)
Hello there!
I sat the LNAT about 4 days ago (22/4) because Bristol asked me to. I had about 9 days to prepare for the LNAT I bough an amazon book and did about a total of 7 (maybe 8) full practice tests and wrote 20 (extra) essays. I devoted all of my time within these 9 days to the LNAT (I literally did not do anything else just study) and I came to the conclusion that the most important thing in the LNAT is constantly practicing. You cannot be taught how to think critically but if you understand the structure of test you will definitely do better at it. Reading articles does not help you so don't do it its literally pointless. Do a lot of practice tests and learn how to write a good essay because if you don't do well on the reading part the essay will definitely save you.
you did 20 essays? dang.
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Notoriety
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#12
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#12
(Original post by anonymous1231231)
you did 20 essays? dang.
Felt like you did just as many!
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spiros2121
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#13
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#13
(Original post by anonymous1231231)
you did 20 essays? dang.
(Original post by Notoriety)
Felt like you did just as many!
Well I had like 9 days so I did as many as I could. The first three that I wrote were very very bad. My teacher was disappointed but as I practiced at the end I managed to learn how to write a quite good - maybe very good - essay for the LNAT
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username3731912
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Notoriety)
Felt like you did just as many!
raahhh that one hurt
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