how to embed quotes???? Watch

confruzzled
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I'm struggling how to embed quotes in english literature without using for example or "___ uses this quote." Can anybody help?
0
reply
Corps
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
I would say that the character/ narrator describes something as “quote”. Or you could try using it as just an extension to your point use the quotations as though they are your own words. It’s easiest to ‘seamlessly’ imbed quotations when they’re smaller too (they’re also easier to remember that way). For example, ‘the “quicksands” are used as a metaphor creating the image of a man being drowned and encumbered by an unaccepting society.’
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
confruzzled
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
Thank you that'll really help with My poems but I'm not sure how to embed them in plays for example in Inspector calls she says "I'm to blame and I'm desperately sorry." How would i embed that into a sentence?
0
reply
Corps
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
Haven’t read the text but I’d probably write that when the character says “quotation” and then say whatever your point is or you could try “(she’s) to blame and (she’s) desperately sorry” using squared brackets rather than ordinary ones though. I don’t like doing that much but it’s an option
(Original post by confruzzled)
Thank you that'll really help with My poems but I'm not sure how to embed them in plays for example in Inspector calls she says "I'm to blame and I'm desperately sorry." How would i embed that into a sentence?
Last edited by Corps; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by confruzzled)
Thank you that'll really help with My poems but I'm not sure how to embed them in plays for example in Inspector calls she says "I'm to blame and I'm desperately sorry." How would i embed that into a sentence?
Sheila admits that 'she's to blame and...desperately sorry'.
1
reply
confruzzled
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#6
Thank you that's really helpful
(Original post by Corps)
Haven’t read the text but I’d probably write that when the character says “quotation” and then say whatever your point is or you could try “(she’s) to blame and (she’s) desperately sorry” using squared brackets rather than ordinary ones though. I don’t like doing that much but it’s an option
0
reply
confruzzled
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#7
Thanks however isn't that bad to use since we're viewing the characters as representations and not actual real life characters? I often get confused.
(Original post by Tolgarda)
Sheila admits that 'she's to blame and...desperately sorry'.
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by confruzzled)
Thanks however isn't that bad to use since we're viewing the characters as representations and not actual real life characters? I often get confused.
Typically, the sentence would begin with a dependent clause along the lines of '[n]ear the end of the play, Sheila admits...', so you'd be able to maintain this perspective like that.

Also, characters can be viewed in whichever way you want them to be. Personally, I like to view these fictive figures as real people as it helps me understand the message of the playwright a little better. Viewing characters as actual people didn't hurt me. In fact, I would say that it might have helped me get full marks on the An Inspector Calls question. Who knows?
0
reply
confruzzled
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#9
Thanks for helping, I was constantly told by my teachers that I won't hit that top level band if I view the characters as real so this helped me know I don't need to focus on that.
(Original post by Tolgarda)
Typically, the sentence would begin with a dependent clause along the lines of '[n]ear the end of the play, Sheila admits...', so you'd be able to maintain this perspective like that.

Also, characters can be viewed in whichever way you want them to be. Personally, I like to view these fictive figures as real people as it helps me understand the message of the playwright a little better. Viewing characters as actual people didn't hurt me. In fact, I would say that it might have helped me get full marks on the An Inspector Calls question. Who knows?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • SOAS University of London
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 May '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Thu, 30 May '19
  • Cranfield University
    Cranfield Forensic MSc Programme Open Day Postgraduate
    Fri, 31 May '19

How did your AQA A-level Business Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (142)
21.16%
The paper was reasonable (327)
48.73%
Not feeling great about that exam... (126)
18.78%
It was TERRIBLE (76)
11.33%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise