Law graduate / undergraduate Watch

This discussion is closed.
Leia studies
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
N.A
Last edited by Leia studies; 4 weeks ago
0
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Yeah,
0
Solicon
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
The GDL takes a year and is not hard to get onto.
0
harrysbar
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
The easiest thing is to phone Admissions at the uni you have Firmed and ask if you could switch your application to Law. They may allow it if they still have vacancies in Law and if you meet the usual entry requirements for Law.
1
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
I don’t know anything about changing courses unfortunately.

Probably the safest bet would be to take a gap year and reapply, if your current university doesn’t allow you to transfer (which there is a decent chance of happening).
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
J-SP is the law recruitment wizard. The UG law wizards are the much more interesting lot ...

What are your predicted grades, where do you have psychology offers from? Do you think you'd be a competitive applicant for KCL/LSE and Cambridge for law?
0
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
Brum and QMUL might let you switch over -- not sure why you're happy with these lot for psych but need LSE for law?

You don't need law work experience for academic law admissions. Only a minority use LNAT (the tippy tops ones invariably). Plenty of decent schools will be in Clearing, and are/were in Extra.
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by Notoriety)
J-SP is the law recruitment wizard. The UG law wizards are the much more interesting lot ...

What are your predicted grades, where do you have psychology offers from? Do you think you'd be a competitive applicant for KCL/LSE and Cambridge for law?
That’s a matter of opinion....
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by J-SP)
That’s a matter of opinion....
I happen to recall your saying you enjoyed us, in that one moment of weakness/generosity.
0
harrysbar
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
It's confusing about why you're looking into 5 completely new unis now, when in post 2 you were talking about asking your Firm choice uni to switch courses and were told that this is definitely worth a try?

Is it that you really want to change subject and Uni? I must say that you weren't very aspirational with your first 5 unis for someone who is predicted A*A*A*. You could use the UCAS search tool to find unis that are still advertising vacancies in Law but if you really have changed your sights from Birmingham/QMUL to Cambridge/LSE it probably would be better to take a gap year and start a completely fresh application in September.
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
There is no right or wrong answer here.

Most people who do a law degree don’t end up in the legal professions - mainly because they don’t want to do it, followed by many not getting into it so having to choose a different career path.

There are a fair number of non law grads who get into law. Many firms recruit around 50% non law grads into their intakes.

But again, there will be mainly non law grads who aim for a legal career and never achieve it.

Your degree is not going to be the deciding factor here.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
Camryn0903
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
What kind of law do you want to go into?
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
I think you are getting a little ahead of yourself and getting into a bit of a last minute panic, going by your threads.

Many don’t get into law (whether a law grad or non law grad) because they don’t have the right motivation or skill set. You ultimately don’t learn that motivation or most of the necessary skills via a degree.

You won’t be at a disadvantage with a gap year, although it depends what you do with it. If you end up not doing anything for the year, then it will disadvantage you. If you do something that helps develop you as a person, then it could help.

Lots of people think they want to be barristers. Then they realise what the job is, the hours you have to work, the typical self employment model, and for many barristers the low pay you will get. Most barristers will have to pay for their own postgrad study investing significant money into the GDL/LPC. Many talk about helping people, but half the time barristers are helping people the wrong side of the law - would be you be happy to “help” those people and fight on their side?

Becoming a barrister is a very tough career choice to make just due to the small number of vacancies - there’s only about 1300-1400 people who are called to the Bar each year. If you really are clear this is the right path for you, and you are willing to put the work in, you need to focus on building the relevant skill set up rather than worrying about your degree. It’s going to be a long slog for the next 6-7 years of your life, not something determined by your degree subject.
I
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 weeks ago
#14
Yeah you’re rushing this. Maybe the gap year would give you sometime to really reflect on this.

Law degree BPTC = 4 years minimum
Non law degree GDL BPTC = 5 years minimum

Then you have to add pupillage to the above.

But that doesn’t account for many in the profession who do a LLM between those points, nor those who secure pupillage 1-3 years after completing the BPTC. Application cycles are on a annual cycle, and many who don’t secure pupillage will be reapply the following year, the year after that etc in the pursuit of their dream.

It sounds like you have a strong moral objective here. To put it brutally, that generally leads to poor pay and so it will be a less competitive route for you, but it’s going to be a hard slog of a career for you if you want to be selective on the work you do. Go and read up on how the cuts the legal aid have impacted Barristers, and then work out if that sounds like something you’d be willing to deal with.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
Last edited by Gothic Kitten; 3 weeks ago
0
harrysbar
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
Your thread is indeed confusing, veering as it does between Psychology or Law, Gap year or not, one of your current 5 unis or a complete change into 5 different unis.

Overall, you just sound massively confused and I think you need to focus on one question at a time, which needs to start with Psychology or Law? You have said, "I don't really want to do Psychology" and "I really want to do Law with a passion" but yet you are still questioning, "which is better, psychology or Law?"

If you know that you would prefer to be studying Law, you're not risking that much in declining your current offers to do Psychology. The only question is whether you would be better off seeing if you could transfer into Law at Birmingham (for example) before you decline them, or whether you would prefer to see if there is something "better" than Birmingham in Extra. That is why I would suggest doing some phoning around next week.

The Year Off route is a whole other ball game and the only way that realistically you are likely to get into the top top unis like Cambridge or LSE. Judging by the indecisiveness of your posts, however, I think it could be a good idea to try to get something sorted out for 2019 anyway (in Law) so that you have that option in the bag. If you subsequently decide to opt for a Gap Year, you will have had more time to reseach how you could strengthen your application in that year and could withdraw from UCAS at any time with no bad feelings and reapply as a fresh applicant in the next cycle.
Last edited by harrysbar; 4 weeks ago
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 weeks ago
#16
No it’s not just because of lack of experience. It’s because there is only about 1400 jobs each year. Many people with lots of experience will still not get pupillage.

Moral objective - you keep talking about wanting to help people. I said nothing about lies - not sure where you got that from.

The average criminal barrister earns £27,500 a year. That average is not first year barristers, that is everyone. That means you won’t be earning a lot of money in your career.

You can earn a lot of money as a barrister (especially if you choose commercial) but in the vast many cases, that means losing your moral objective. You’ve already stated you’d want to refuse work that didn’t align to your morals, so already you are limiting your client base and your ability to earn. Working as a commercial barrister is much more competitive - you’ll need to be a spectacular candidate in all manners if that’s what you’re aiming for (not sure it is though).

If you don’t want to do law at Birmingham, I am not sure why you want to do Psychology there either. There’s no point wasting people’s time asking if you can move course if you have no desire to study law at Birmingham.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
Last edited by Gothic Kitten; 3 weeks ago
0
harrysbar
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
I think for people who are 100% committed to Law as a career it is easier to do a Law degree than a non Law degree followed by the GDL since the latter have missed out on immersing themselves in Law for 3 years and getting better access to law related extracurriculars. In addition to this, the GDL is a steep learning curb and very intense.

You have now said that you don't want to try to switch to Law at Birmingham or QMUL so that option is off the table - now we are getting somewhere. In that case, you may as well decline the offers for Psychology that you currently holding, which would leave you free to respond quickly to any good unis that do still have vacancies in Law. I would try to get an offer from the best one you can (in Extra or in Clearing) and if that doesn't work out to your satisfaction, it would become clear that a Year Out is the logical thing to do. It still only *wastes* one year and is a lot cheaper than paying the GDL fees.

With excellent acheived grades and the opportunity to do LNAT and get relevant legal work experience, you would then be in a fantastic position to apply to the top unis that you really want to aim for.
1
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
You don’t need legal work experience to get into a law course.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
harrysbar
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by J-SP)
You don’t need legal work experience to get into a law course.
No but it demonstrates interest and if you were taking a Year Out anyway, why wouldn't you try and do something at least vaguely related, even if it's only doing some volunteering with the Citizens Advice Bureau
0
J-SP
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 weeks ago
#20
Lots of people want to work in the legal profession and are not motivated by helping people.

So you want to become a barrister - would you be happy representing a child killer in court? Or would you be happy representing a massive oil company/cigarette company whose products are causing damage to millions of people? Or would you be happy representing a large international company in court who has made loads of its employees redundant?

That’s what I mean by moral objective.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • London Metropolitan University
    Postgraduate Mini Open Evening - Holloway Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 May '19
  • Brunel University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 22 May '19
  • University of Roehampton
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 22 May '19

How did your AQA A-level Psychology Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (201)
22.14%
The paper was reasonable (387)
42.62%
Not feeling great about that exam... (173)
19.05%
It was TERRIBLE (147)
16.19%

Watched Threads

View All