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Woofsaidthedog
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Can someone please explain to me the answer to this question.

Describe how the hydrogen atoms in a methane molecule are bonded to the carbon atom?

One electron from hydrogen and one from carbon form a shared pair. (okay so its covalently bonded..)
that are attracted to the nuclei of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by electrostatic attraction (but isn't it covalently bonded so there should be intermolecular forces?)
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Pigster
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(Original post by Woofsaidthedog)
Can someone please explain to me the answer to this question.

Describe how the hydrogen atoms in a methane molecule are bonded to the carbon atom?

One electron from hydrogen and one from carbon form a shared pair. (okay so its covalently bonded..)
that are attracted to the nuclei of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by electrostatic attraction (but isn't it covalently bonded so there should be intermolecular forces?)
The covalent bond is the intramolecular force holding the atoms to each other.

There are intermolecular forces holding the methane molecules to each other (these are variously named London forces, dispersion forces, instantaneous dipole induced dipole forces or a type of van de Waals force).
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Woofsaidthedog
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I don't understand the electrostatic attraction part. Isn't that for ionic bonds.
(Original post by Pigster)
The covalent bond is the intramolecular force holding the atoms to each other.

There are intermolecular forces holding the methane molecules to each other (these are variously named London forces, dispersion forces, instantaneous dipole induced dipole forces or a type of van de Waals force).
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Pigster
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The nuclei both have a +ve charge, they both attract the shared pair of e- since they have a -ve charge.
(Original post by Woofsaidthedog)
I don't understand the electrostatic attraction part. Isn't that for ionic bonds.
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