studyingpeach
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Hi everyone - I do AQA German, but I feel like the technique for the speaking exam is essentially the same across languages.
I have my actual exam on 1 May but tomorrow our teacher is giving us an individual test on our chosen theme for the General Conversation section. I've been trying to learn my speaking questions for the past few days - I just gave myself a test and I remember absolutely nothing! Does anyone have any tips on how to get the answers in your head? Usually I just wing the speaking tests and get decent marks (in my mock I got 53/60) but I really don't want to risk it for my actual exam.
Sorry I rambled so much - as you can see I'm a nervous wreck hahaa
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inoubliable
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A lot of people in my school had the same issue. In german, we were allowed to learn answers for GC, so it wasn't spontaneous. thankfully, i have a very good memory and was able to learn around 24 really heavy questions. however, most of the people in my class couldn't. i got 52/60

so they went for a different technique. as opposed to learning the whole thing word for word, learn triggers and bulletpoints for certain things. so you'd write the question, for example,

hast du einen besten Freund?

and then under it write bulletpoints, things that you can easily remember, e.g.

> Ja; Samuel
> vier Jahre
> uber alles reden
> letzte Woche; ins Kino
etc.

this will give a hint of spontaneity in your answers. funnily enough, though, i performed much better in my french - 58/60 and that was completely spontaneous. here's my advice for completely spontaneous, if that's something that sounds better? (ignore that is says french, im just copying n pasting it, still same points stand)

> Learn structures you can adapt to any question. You should learn about 20 of these complex structures, which you can slot in to really impress the examiner. You don't need to use them all, but it would be very good to have many to adapt, only for your GC and photocard though. For example, pour ______, il faut que je fasse.....
> Think in French. This sound stupid, but when asked a question and you think in French as opposed to in English, it allows you to say only what you are capable of. Your mind, when thinking of English, has a general tendency to over complicate things, and you just don't know how to say things like that in French.
> Idioms. Learn a good few idioms, one or two per major topic. e.g. Il pleut comme vauches qui pissent, faire un tabac, avoir du pot. These help you sound native, apparently
> Idk if this will help you, but with me, I asked my teacher if I could chew gum in the exam. This helped relax my jaws and helped my pronunciation for words and helped me feel more at ease in general
> Lean sophisticated vocab. Literally go online and search words, 1 or two, for each major topic that will make the examiner go Whoa
> Practice with friends
> Learn time-consuming techniques. These will buy you some time to formulate a response. For example, what an interesting question! or I have never thought about that, hmm (obviously in French).
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studyingpeach
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Thank you so much! This is absolutely amazing and I'll definitely be using these techniques. Since you seem to be amazing at German, do you have any tips for the other exams (especially listening)? It would really help me out!
(Original post by inoubliable)
A lot of people in my school had the same issue. In german, we were allowed to learn answers for GC, so it wasn't spontaneous. thankfully, i have a very good memory and was able to learn around 24 really heavy questions. however, most of the people in my class couldn't. i got 52/60

so they went for a different technique. as opposed to learning the whole thing word for word, learn triggers and bulletpoints for certain things. so you'd write the question, for example,

hast du einen besten Freund?

and then under it write bulletpoints, things that you can easily remember, e.g.

> Ja; Samuel
> vier Jahre
> uber alles reden
> letzte Woche; ins Kino
etc.

this will give a hint of spontaneity in your answers. funnily enough, though, i performed much better in my french - 58/60 and that was completely spontaneous. here's my advice for completely spontaneous, if that's something that sounds better? (ignore that is says french, im just copying n pasting it, still same points stand)

> Learn structures you can adapt to any question. You should learn about 20 of these complex structures, which you can slot in to really impress the examiner. You don't need to use them all, but it would be very good to have many to adapt, only for your GC and photocard though. For example, pour ______, il faut que je fasse.....
> Think in French. This sound stupid, but when asked a question and you think in French as opposed to in English, it allows you to say only what you are capable of. Your mind, when thinking of English, has a general tendency to over complicate things, and you just don't know how to say things like that in French.
> Idioms. Learn a good few idioms, one or two per major topic. e.g. Il pleut comme vauches qui pissent, faire un tabac, avoir du pot. These help you sound native, apparently
> Idk if this will help you, but with me, I asked my teacher if I could chew gum in the exam. This helped relax my jaws and helped my pronunciation for words and helped me feel more at ease in general
> Lean sophisticated vocab. Literally go online and search words, 1 or two, for each major topic that will make the examiner go Whoa
> Practice with friends
> Learn time-consuming techniques. These will buy you some time to formulate a response. For example, what an interesting question! or I have never thought about that, hmm (obviously in French).
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inoubliable
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(Original post by studyingpeach)
Thank you so much! This is absolutely amazing and I'll definitely be using these techniques. Since you seem to be amazing at German, do you have any tips for the other exams (especially listening)? It would really help me out!
i had to disappoint, but i honestly just yolo'ed the rest lool

for listening, definitely revise vocab on memrise. that will help with your vocab recognition.
reading and listening papers you can prepare for both at the same time - they're both receptive skills and very tangled together.

as for writing, i flopped that. don't overcomplicate things. add wow structures and your past, present and future, but don't overcomplicate it. it will cause you to lose more marks than gain.
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studyingpeach
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(Original post by inoubliable)
i had to disappoint, but i honestly just yolo'ed the rest lool

for listening, definitely revise vocab on memrise. that will help with your vocab recognition.
reading and listening papers you can prepare for both at the same time - they're both receptive skills and very tangled together.

as for writing, i flopped that. don't overcomplicate things. add wow structures and your past, present and future, but don't overcomplicate it. it will cause you to lose more marks than gain.
Thank you for the tips haha
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