Can I live on my own in a flat usually rented to non-students? Watch

el.182
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Sorry if that title seems like a silly question, but I'm planning to move out of uni halls into a 1 bedroom cottage a little closer to where I work. I'm aware HMOs are in place for flats with a lot of students, but as I would be on my own, and would have family as a guarantor, would anything be different compared to what would happen if a non-student were to move in? D'you reckon I'd have to pay extra deposit?

I've had very short phone calls to letting agents in the past to 2 bedroom properties only advertising to professional couples. I've found that listings that don't mention a proximity to universities, or instead mentioning good school links, tend to be less welcoming of students. However as it's a 1 bedroom I highly doubt they'd be looking to rent out to a family(???)

Thanks for reading!
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by el.182)
Sorry if that title seems like a silly question, but I'm planning to move out of uni halls into a 1 bedroom cottage a little closer to where I work. I'm aware HMOs are in place for flats with a lot of students, but as I would be on my own, and would have family as a guarantor, would anything be different compared to what would happen if a non-student were to move in? D'you reckon I'd have to pay extra deposit?

I've had very short phone calls to letting agents in the past to 2 bedroom properties only advertising to professional couples. I've found that listings that don't mention a proximity to universities, or instead mentioning good school links, tend to be less welcoming of students. However as it's a 1 bedroom I highly doubt they'd be looking to rent out to a family(???)

Thanks for reading!
As a landlord myself, I have strict rules as to who I let to. If you can pay the rent it would seem silly not to let you in as a tenant. As you correctly surmise - the only stumbling block will be the fact that you need a guarantor. You need to warn the family that the letting agents will scrutinise their bank statements with a very fine tooth comb
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el.182
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Living in halls before, they had requested a guarantor form, and prepare a statement sent to future landlords detailing the rent payments and whether or not the potential tenant was on time, so I'm hoping this would look good! Would you be wary of a student, or maybe increase rent/deposit?
(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
As a landlord myself, I have strict rules as to who I let to. If you can pay the rent it would seem silly not to let you in as a tenant. As you correctly surmise - the only stumbling block will be the fact that you need a guarantor. You need to warn the family that the letting agents will scrutinise their bank statements with a very fine tooth comb
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by el.182)
Living in halls before, they had requested a guarantor form, and prepare a statement sent to future landlords detailing the rent payments and whether or not the potential tenant was on time, so I'm hoping this would look good! Would you be wary of a student, or maybe increase rent/deposit?
I actually prefer students as tenants. They are more manageable. If they do wrong I can complain to their university . I never ever ever rent to people on benefits. I had an absolute disaster a few years ago. I was being kind as they had lost their baby to a cot death. They wrecked my house. Cost me over 20k to put it right and then it turned out they had killed the child. Had a second child removed.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by el.182)
Sorry if that title seems like a silly question, but I'm planning to move out of uni halls into a 1 bedroom cottage a little closer to where I work. I'm aware HMOs are in place for flats with a lot of students, but as I would be on my own, and would have family as a guarantor, would anything be different compared to what would happen if a non-student were to move in? D'you reckon I'd have to pay extra deposit?

I've had very short phone calls to letting agents in the past to 2 bedroom properties only advertising to professional couples. I've found that listings that don't mention a proximity to universities, or instead mentioning good school links, tend to be less welcoming of students. However as it's a 1 bedroom I highly doubt they'd be looking to rent out to a family(???)

Thanks for reading!
I rented a 'non-student' 1 bed flat during my first degree. I was lucky that the couple who owned the flat were very understanding and were happy to accept a parent as my guarantor; they met my parents when I viewed the flat, so were satisfied that we were decent types. They never advertised their properties as potential student lets, but assessed each potential tenant on a case by case basis. I didn't have to pay any extra fees or deposit iirc.
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doodle_333
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As you can see from the replies, it only takes one bad experience to put a landlord off. So there are plenty who will refuse to let to students. It doesn't necessarily mean they want families, they just want professionals they see as more reliable And trustworthy. Some of that is about finances, they have a guarantor but don't want the work of chasing for rent, they don't want the place trashed, they also don't want someone who might not realise you have to do X Y or Z in the house and accidentally lead to damage etc. They also will want to let for more than 9 months. That's not to say you won't find something, just why some will say no.
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katf
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Some will do. Both me and my partner are students, albeit also working and we rent a cottage. We can afford the rent so it's fine.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by doodle_333)
They also will want to let for more than 9 months.
That's good point actually, I forgot to mention that. When I signed my tenancy agreement, I was paying monthly indefinitely, so there were no breaks in payments over the summer holidays each year for example. My landlord was also more relaxed about it when she was assured that I wouldn't be moving each year (as students commonly do), as she wanted someone stable and long-term.
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