Exam stress Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
Since doing my GCSEs I've struggled with symptoms which seem to link to anxiety, but haven't been officially diagnosed. It seemed to be getting better, but in the last month its gotten a lot worse, which is making me extremely worried about exams. I've been to the doctors countless times regarding stomach pains, which they've said is probably stress induced. But I also think I'm emetophobic (fear of sick/being sick) which means every time I get this stomach pain, my instant reaction in my head is 'I'm going to be sick', which obviously doesn't help.
I was ill during my GCSEs, which resulted in appendicitis and had my appendix out two days after my last exam. And I don't want a similar situation again.
But I am so worried about my exams in a few weeks. Most of mine (I have 11 in total) are around 2 hours long and the thought of them makes me so worried about how I'll be, which just makes the situation worse and the cycle continues!
Does anyone have tips that helped with similar situations or anxiety in exams?
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RazzzBerries
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Hi

I've been in a similar situation with the 'stress' side of your issue. These tips are going to sounds CRINGEY, but they helped me, I promise!

Buy a stress ball
It keeps your mind distracted and releases the tension in your muscles.

When you feel like you're getting anxious again, use the 3-3-3 rule
The website I'm linking here explains it better and gives more tips, but it's basically telling you to stop thinking irrationally and focus on 3 things you see, while breathing in and out. It brings you back to the present moment.

Do it for yourself
Think of your stress as a hurdle. You have all the power to overcome it and if you fall, all you're going to do is dust yourself off and carry on. This is YOUR race, no one else's. Everyone you know will be proud of what you achieve, even if you think otherwise.

Best of luck. Please PM me if you want to talk x
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umbrellala
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Since doing my GCSEs I've struggled with symptoms which seem to link to anxiety, but haven't been officially diagnosed. It seemed to be getting better, but in the last month its gotten a lot worse, which is making me extremely worried about exams. I've been to the doctors countless times regarding stomach pains, which they've said is probably stress induced. But I also think I'm emetophobic (fear of sick/being sick) which means every time I get this stomach pain, my instant reaction in my head is 'I'm going to be sick', which obviously doesn't help.
I was ill during my GCSEs, which resulted in appendicitis and had my appendix out two days after my last exam. And I don't want a similar situation again.
But I am so worried about my exams in a few weeks. Most of mine (I have 11 in total) are around 2 hours long and the thought of them makes me so worried about how I'll be, which just makes the situation worse and the cycle continues!
Does anyone have tips that helped with similar situations or anxiety in exams?
I also struggle with anxiousness (I won't call it anxiety since I'm not officially diagnosed) around my exams. In the few weeks leading up to my exams I feel extremely nauseous in the mornings, my heart beats a little faster than usual, and I get the shakes. I've been through periods around my A-Levels when I'd be sick every single morning, sometimes having to leave lessons, because I was so nervous. It's not even that I'd be feeling nervous in my mind, my body just had a mind of its own. So I understand!

Whilst I can't give you any advice that will get rid of it completely, what I usually do is make sure I think about my exams as rationally as possible. At the end of the day, exams might be important but they aren't the end-all and be-all, there will always be alternative paths for everything I want to do and some bad exam results can't stop me. I might be disappointed for a while, but I'll just pick myself back up and carry on. For example, if I fail my exams at university this year I won't be able to go on my year abroad next year. It will be devastating if I don't get to go whilst all my friends get to go to where I've been dreaming of visiting, but there will be other options for me. It could be a blessing in disguise. My main tactic is to prepare as thoroughly as I can for each exam, which sounds obvious but having the peace of mind that you're trying your best does help. Manage your time well and try not to get panicked. Make sure you're putting aside time to relax and see friends. Sitting and scrolling through social media or watching intense TV programmes doesn't count as rest because your brain will still be working hard. Go outside, listen to some music, speak to your family. And as for the exam itself, take a few deep breaths before you start and take a toilet break if you get overwhelmed. The 2hrs will go by so quickly that you'll wonder where the time went. As someone who is now in their 5th year of taking official exams, you'll be fine! It's always nerve-wracking but thousands of people take exams every year and everyone is in the same boat. Your hard work will pay off and you'll do well
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