Looking for thoughts on my available options for university Watch

zentico
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So, I posted about what I might need to do as a lot of universities want GCSE Maths B and HE course. Although, I started calling pretty much all of the universities I might want to go to and spoke with admissions teams, tutors, and advisors.

Some of the universities will take me just based on my work experience, and others still say that I should go and do a HE course with Maths modules and also do a Maths GCSE. I'm stuck between the choices of either going directly onto a course, going to do a Foundation course, or do the HE and GCSE.

My thoughts being, it would be cheaper to go straight onto the course. However, I understand that it might actually be useful or beneficial to go and do a Maths related course before I go onto a computer science degree. What should I do?

I'm a mature student of about 27 and I actually already work in the field that I would be getting a degree for, so I could do an open degree etc or something like that and my company actually offers a degree apprenticeship in software development, but it's not the same degree as a computer science degree which is what I really want.

Let me know what you think, I appreciate any input or thoughts on it. My mindset isn't so much on the loss of income I'd take, I think I just want to go back and experience the entire aspect of university not just the learning, and that's not about partying as I don't drink. But the aspect of being able to study so much and network and meet other like minded individuals and get a greater in depth understanding of computer science.
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adam271
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Like I said in the other post GCSE mathematics at grade B is only really an issue for the Russell Group universities.

Hull ask for C
Keele ask for C
Middlesex ask for C
Bath ask for C

I'm sure there are loads more so the GCSE at B isn't a huge thing. Quite a few universities don't even mention GCSEs.

That being said mathematics is a huge part of Comp/Sci so doing it would be beneficial.
If you do a foundation year then it will bring you up to speed by covering both GCSE and A-level Mathematics.

Another option like you said is to do an Access to HE course these are great but finding a computing access to HE course can be tough as they are thin on the ground. If you do find one though they often let you study one GCSE alongside the Access to HE course.


Going by what you said I think if your not too picky about your university I would recommend finding one that will just take a C grade in mathematics.
Then either find a suitable access to HE course or simply do a foundation year so you can learn all the mathematics you will need for the degree.


Edit:
I'm 27 as well and plan to go to university to do Comp/Sci as well

I plan to do an Access to HE programme September (in science as there are no computing ones near me) Alongside with P/T work as it means I can stay and home for a year and save up for university.
Then I will probably apply for a foundation year at a university in Comp/Sci.

So I'm doing Access course then Foundation year then Degree.
This pathway works for me as I can save up for the degree while studying my access course. Although it does mean I will be doing another year in education; which isn't really an issue for me.
Also it gives me time to self teach myself all the mathematics of GCSE & A-level that I never learned at school and that is expected in the degree.

Whatever your decision don't underestimate the amount of mathematics that is in a Comp/Sci degree.
Last edited by adam271; 3 weeks ago
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Grizwuld
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The admissions issue seems to be about maths competence. If your maths is GCSE B or better then go straight to the uni degree course. If not choose the path that gets you up to speed.

This: "But the aspect of being able to study so much and network and meet other like minded individuals and get a greater in depth understanding of computer science.", seems much the same decision process.

(Original post by zentico)
So, I posted about what I might need to do as a lot of universities want GCSE Maths B and HE course. Although, I started calling pretty much all of the universities I might want to go to and spoke with admissions teams, tutors, and advisors.

Some of the universities will take me just based on my work experience, and others still say that I should go and do a HE course with Maths modules and also do a Maths GCSE. I'm stuck between the choices of either going directly onto a course, going to do a Foundation course, or do the HE and GCSE.

My thoughts being, it would be cheaper to go straight onto the course. However, I understand that it might actually be useful or beneficial to go and do a Maths related course before I go onto a computer science degree. What should I do?

I'm a mature student of about 27 and I actually already work in the field that I would be getting a degree for, so I could do an open degree etc or something like that and my company actually offers a degree apprenticeship in software development, but it's not the same degree as a computer science degree which is what I really want.

Let me know what you think, I appreciate any input or thoughts on it. My mindset isn't so much on the loss of income I'd take, I think I just want to go back and experience the entire aspect of university not just the learning, and that's not about partying as I don't drink. But the aspect of being able to study so much and network and meet other like minded individuals and get a greater in depth understanding of computer science.
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returnmigrant
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Do the introduction course (Access or Foundation). Studying at a later age is hard work and you need to get all your study skills up to speed again, get the organisational stuff in place, and it will also help with your confidence, both personal and academic. This way, you will be best prepared for the degree course.

I did OU units before I applied to Uni aged 30. They were invaluable for all of the above.
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Grizwuld
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Well put, I concur.
(Original post by returnmigrant)
Do the introduction course (Access or Foundation). Studying at a later age is hard work and you need to get all your study skills up to speed again, get the organisational stuff in place, and it will also help with your confidence, both personal and academic. This way, you will be best prepared for the degree course.

I did OU units before I applied to Uni aged 30. They were invaluable for all of the above.
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